B645 - First Aid in Teaching Bill 2014

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Jarred
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B645 - First Aid in Teaching Bill 2014, HM TSR Government
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First Aid in Teaching Act

An Act to ensure all teachers are trained in first aid in the event of harm/injury in the classroom.

Preamble
Currenty, basic first aid training is not a requirement for teachers and assistants across the UK. Accidents are common in the classroom, including cuts, burns, seizures and anaphylaxis. Historically the role of the "school nurse" filled this gap, however, to save time and ensure that there is always someone available, the government feels it would be sensible to ensure first aid is a requirement for all teachers to begin work. This may include additional training for teachers at special educational schools.

BE IT ENACTED by the Queen’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

WORDING
1. Definition
OFSTED refers to the office for standards in education, children's services and skills.

The HSE refers to the Health and Safety Executive

The QCA refers to the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority.

LEAs refer to local education authorities.

This bill applies to state, public, grammar schools and academies.

WORDING
2. Training
Before the academic year begins for September 2014/2015, all trained teachers, assistant teachers and auxiliary staff must be trained to an adequate level in first aid. This does not apply to teaching staff outside the classroom. First aid training must obey all OFSTED requirements on first aid training, in line with child carer first aid training. All training will be run by LEAs in conjunction with charitable organisations specified in the guidelines. This will be the HSE or QCA, or provided by the Red Cross, St John Ambulance or St Andrew Ambulance. Any staff members who are found to be teaching without said qualification, as of September 2014, will be suspended for 1 year.

3. Cost
Costs will be substantially lowered as they will be LEA in house training sessions. Cost for one person similar first aid training in child carers equates to approximately £103. Teaching staff in the UK breaks down as follows;
England= 800,000
Scotland = 60,000
Wales = 26,000
Northern Ireland = 19,000.

Therefore to train every teacher individually we expend maximum £92 million, however this will be substantially lower.

WORDING
4. Retraining
This bill will also ensure first aid refreshers classes will be incorporated into teacher training days.

SHORT TITLE, COMMENCEMENT AND EXTENT

5. Short title
(1) This act may be cited as the First Aid in Teaching Bill 2014.

6. Commencement and extent
(1) This Act shall come into force on the first day of July 2015, to apply in the academic year 2015/2016.
(2) This Act extends to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
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chrisawhitmore
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Pretty neat idea. Aye from me.
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Qwertish
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I like the principle. A few things, however:

  • You need to sort out the formatting. It's horrific.
  • By 'public school' in section one, do you mean 'state school' or do you actually mean 'public school', and, if so, what is your definition of 'public school' (HMC, Clarendon schools...)?
  • The part titles are all 'Wording'; I'm guessing that needs to be changed.
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Cryptographic
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I suport this in general, however maybe a gradual fade in (to ease costs and not overload supply):
e.g. By
September 2014 each school must have 1 in 4 teachers trained.
September 2015 each school must have 2 in 4 teachers trained.
September 2016 each school must have 3 in 4 teachers trained.
September 2017 each school must have 4 in 4 teachers trained

Also a massive contradiction:

'Before the academic year begins for September 2014/2015, all trained teachers, assistant teachers and auxiliary staff must be trained to an adequate level in first aid.

This Act shall come into force on the first day of July 2015, to apply in the academic year 2015/2016.'


Please rectify in the next reading.

P.S. Thank you for the clear costing and long may it continue.
P.P.S. Please add citations for your data.

Add these into the Second Reading and it is an aye from me.
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barnetlad
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Aye from me. For younger children a teacher providing first aid may be less scary than having to leave the classroom to see the school nurse.
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ThisIsn'tSpam
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Aye, this will be a welcome addition to the curriculum.
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Obiejess
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Aye

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PhysicsKid
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Aye- key modernisation!
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That Bearded Man
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(Original post by Cryptographic)
I suport this in general, however maybe a gradual fade in (to ease costs and not overload supply):
e.g. By
September 2014 each school must have 1 in 4 teachers trained.
September 2015 each school must have 2 in 4 teachers trained.
September 2016 each school must have 3 in 4 teachers trained.
September 2017 each school must have 4 in 4 teachers trained

Also a massive contradiction:

'Before the academic year begins for September 2014/2015, all trained teachers, assistant teachers and auxiliary staff must be trained to an adequate level in first aid.

This Act shall come into force on the first day of July 2015, to apply in the academic year 2015/2016.'


Please rectify in the next reading.

P.S. Thank you for the clear costing and long may it continue.
P.P.S. Please add citations for your data.

Add these into the Second Reading and it is an aye from me.
Good idea regarding staggering it, will send to second reading.

And yes haha - completely overlooked the dates at the end!
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El Salvador
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Thank you Mr Speaker.

Aye.
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Lipvig
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Good idea in principle, and I'm actually surprised teachers don't already need it.
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username1373182
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Aye.
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maddo
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Aye. Good idea, simple enough, surprised that it isn't already in place.
(Original post by Cryptographic)
By September 2014 each school must have 1 in 4 teachers trained.
September 2015 each school must have 2 in 4 teachers trained.
September 2016 each school must have 3 in 4 teachers trained.
September 2017 each school must have 4 in 4 teachers trained
This staggered effect also works better for the aforementioned reasons.
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Mazzini
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(Original post by Cryptographic)
I suport this in general, however maybe a gradual fade in (to ease costs and not overload supply):
e.g. By
September 2014 each school must have 1 in 4 teachers trained.
September 2015 each school must have 2 in 4 teachers trained.
September 2016 each school must have 3 in 4 teachers trained.
September 2017 each school must have 4 in 4 teachers trained

Also a massive contradiction:

'Before the academic year begins for September 2014/2015, all trained teachers, assistant teachers and auxiliary staff must be trained to an adequate level in first aid.

This Act shall come into force on the first day of July 2015, to apply in the academic year 2015/2016.'


Please rectify in the next reading.

P.S. Thank you for the clear costing and long may it continue.
P.P.S. Please add citations for your data.

Add these into the Second Reading and it is an aye from me.
I agree with what you have said - but perhaps to add to the gradual training thing, it could be 1 in 4 in every department of the school. Otherwise the school might train teachers by department and if an accident did happen, for example, in a French lesson, there might not be any trained teachers in the French/modern languages dept. :dontknow:

Sorry, a bit convoluted and long-winded :o:
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bun
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Add in the stuff Cryptographic has already mentioned, and it's probably aye from me.

Just wondering though, are you sure it's entirely necessary?
Schools have to have at least 1 first aider per 50-100 people in the school.
The likelihood is that it will be considerably more than this. Sports teachers will likely have a first aid qualification, similarly many of the science staff (biology in particular it seems) and finally, in all the schools I've done some work in, they have first aid courses for the staff on INSET (or other) days already.
Not always an official course etc, but run by a qualified first aider, and covering the very basic life saving scenarios.

Whilst it would be great for all teachers to know first aid, I'm not sure this bill is entirely necessary - most already have the basic knowledge / an official First Aid or Emergency aid qualification, and focring all the teachers to give up more time seems slightly unnecessary and a bit of a waste of money.

Having 'teaching first aid' sessions in schools for pupils, where teachers could also drop by if they wish... that seems a far better idea to me
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SciFiRory
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aye
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That Bearded Man
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(Original post by bun)
Add in the stuff Cryptographic has already mentioned, and it's probably aye from me.

Just wondering though, are you sure it's entirely necessary?
Schools have to have at least 1 first aider per 50-100 people in the school.
The likelihood is that it will be considerably more than this. Sports teachers will likely have a first aid qualification, similarly many of the science staff (biology in particular it seems) and finally, in all the schools I've done some work in, they have first aid courses for the staff on INSET (or other) days already.
Not always an official course etc, but run by a qualified first aider, and covering the very basic life saving scenarios.

Whilst it would be great for all teachers to know first aid, I'm not sure this bill is entirely necessary - most already have the basic knowledge / an official First Aid or Emergency aid qualification, and focring all the teachers to give up more time seems slightly unnecessary and a bit of a waste of money.

Having 'teaching first aid' sessions in schools for pupils, where teachers could also drop by if they wish... that seems a far better idea to me
This actually comes from a personal experience where a student had a seizure in a classroom and neither the teacher, nor the teacher in the adjoining classrooms knew what to do. Only a classmate in an adjacent room did. So, had that class mate not been there and it was something more serious it could have been dangerous.

Training people in first aid in general is surely also a good investment.
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Birchington
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This seems fair enough. I think the majority of all public-facing key workers should hold a basic level of competence in first aid.
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nikkoch
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Definitely aye
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wizardtop
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I agree that teachers need to learn the basics in first aid.So its a Aye from me.
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