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    Hello, I'm revising for my F211 exam next month but I don't understand the process of tissue fluid formation. I *think* I might have figured it out but I'm not entirely sure, so if I write the process below of how I think it is formed, I would be very grateful if someone here could mark it and see whether or not it's right/if I've missed anything out. Thank you!

    1) at the arterial end of the capillary, blood hydrostatic pressure is high due to the contraction of the muscle in the left ventricle wall. This causes tissue fluid and dissolved substances to flow out of the capillary through the gaps in the wall.
    2) large plasma proteins cannot fit through the gaps. This lowers the water potential in the blood in the capillary compared with the water potential outside of the capillary.
    3) at the venous end of the capillary, blood hydrostatic pressure is low. The water potential is low due to the presence of the large plasma proteins.
    4) fluid and dissolved substances return to the capillary down a water potential gradient, allowing them to re enter the blood and return to cells
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    (Original post by RichardPG)
    Hello, I'm revising for my F211 exam next month but I don't understand the process of tissue fluid formation. I *think* I might have figured it out but I'm not entirely sure, so if I write the process below of how I think it is formed, I would be very grateful if someone here could mark it and see whether or not it's right/if I've missed anything out. Thank you!

    1) at the arterial end of the capillary, blood hydrostatic pressure is high due to the contraction of the muscle in the left ventricle wall. This causes tissue fluid and dissolved substances to flow out of the capillary through the gaps in the wall.
    2) large plasma proteins cannot fit through the gaps. This lowers the water potential in the blood in the capillary compared with the water potential outside of the capillary.
    3) at the venous end of the capillary, blood hydrostatic pressure is low. The water potential is low due to the presence of the large plasma proteins.
    4) fluid and dissolved substances return to the capillary down a water potential gradient, allowing them to re enter the blood and return to cells
    This is correct. One thing I would add is that excess tissue fluid is drained by the lymphatic system (although I'm not sure of this comes under your course, if not just leave it)
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    (Original post by Asklepios)
    This is correct. One thing I would add is that excess tissue fluid is drained by the lymphatic system (although I'm not sure of this comes under your course, if not just leave it)
    Thank you!
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    (Original post by RichardPG)
    Hello, I'm revising for my F211 exam next month but I don't understand the process of tissue fluid formation. I *think* I might have figured it out but I'm not entirely sure, so if I write the process below of how I think it is formed, I would be very grateful if someone here could mark it and see whether or not it's right/if I've missed anything out. Thank you!

    1) at the arterial end of the capillary, blood hydrostatic pressure is high due to the contraction of the muscle in the left ventricle wall. This causes tissue fluid and dissolved substances to flow out of the capillary through the gaps in the wall.
    2) large plasma proteins cannot fit through the gaps. This lowers the water potential in the blood in the capillary compared with the water potential outside of the capillary.
    3) at the venous end of the capillary, blood hydrostatic pressure is low. The water potential is low due to the presence of the large plasma proteins.
    4) fluid and dissolved substances return to the capillary down a water potential gradient, allowing them to re enter the blood and return to cells
    eugh I hate tissue fluid... but yes that is right!
    but yeah, just like Asklepios said, the excess fluid enters the lymph vessels, which them turns the fluid into lymph, and taken to the main lymph vessels in the thorax where it is then returned to the blood. (all you need to know)
    I'm taking the same exam in a months time too... feeling nervous aha!
 
 
 
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