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    I have an undergraduate degree already (read my venomous posts concerning my much hated degree) from a university. I have realised that my problems that were originally routed in choosing that degree stemmed from my a-levels; I had chosen my a-levels in an attempt to mould with my peers and my family members.
    This time, I want to choose a-levels that are more akin to my tastes at this present time. Hopefully, when i finish, I can progress onto a masters. I know this sounds crazy, but I have no proof of my academic merit. My degree marks are universally poor and my original a-levels marks are just mediocre.

    I was thinking about sitting them as an external candidate.
    I also want to boost my academic qualifications to distract employers’ focus from my degree.
    Any thoughts?
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    Go for it.

    That said, it really depends on the subjects you're thinking of taking. For subjects like maths, it's enough to simply enter yourself for the exams as an independent candidate. You can ask your secondary school if they accept independent candidates, but if they don't, you'll need to search for a school or centre that will let you sit the exams. The advantage of being able to simply enter yourself for the exams is that you can get the A Level done and over with in just 1 year as opposed to 2.

    But for any subjects which have a coursework or practical element such as English or the sciences, you'll need to enrol in your local college for the full 2 year course. If you're lucky, you might be able to find an independent centre which will let you do fast-track A Levels, but always make sure to find out if they actually enter you for the exams, or if they are simply a tuition service.
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    (Original post by Quivai)
    Go for it.

    That said, it really depends on the subjects you're thinking of taking. For subjects like maths, it's enough to simply enter yourself for the exams as an independent candidate. You can ask your secondary school if they accept independent candidates, but if they don't, you'll need to search for a school or centre that will let you sit the exams. The advantage of being able to simply enter yourself for the exams is that you can get the A Level done and over with in just 1 year as opposed to 2.

    But for any subjects which have a coursework or practical element such as English or the sciences, you'll need to enrol in your local college for the full 2 year course. If you're lucky, you might be able to find an independent centre which will let you do fast-track A Levels, but always make sure to find out if they actually enter you for the exams, or if they are simply a tuition service.
    I think I might have to enrol!

    Thank you. What are you doing?
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    I'm also doing my A Levels in my mid-20s. When I did my GCSEs around 8 years ago, I only managed to scrape together 4 C grades, and since a lot of places want a minimum of 5 GCSEs grade C or above, I was not allowed to continue on to A Levels. After that, I pretty much dropped out of the education system altogether.

    Fast forward to now, where I'm older and wiser, I want to try and catch up on the education I missed out on, so I got it into my head last September that I will teach myself Maths and Further Maths all in one year. The internet is chock-full of educational resources for maths, so I thought "Why the hell not?". Unfortunately, I didn't take it seriously enough until January, so I've had to downgrade to just Maths and AS Further Maths due to time constraints. I'll be sitting the exams at my local secondary school this May and June.

    Next year, I'll be attending an independent centre where I can do fast-track English and the science subjects as well as the A2 Further Maths I missed out on doing this year.
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    (Original post by Quivai)
    I'm also doing my A Levels in my mid-20s. When I did my GCSEs around 8 years ago, I only managed to scrape together 4 C grades, and since a lot of places want a minimum of 5 GCSEs grade C or above, I was not allowed to continue on to A Levels. After that, I pretty much dropped out of the education system altogether.

    Fast forward to now, where I'm older and wiser, I want to try and catch up on the education I missed out on, so I got it into my head last September that I will teach myself Maths and Further Maths all in one year. The internet is chock-full of educational resources for maths, so I thought "Why the hell not?". Unfortunately, I didn't take it seriously enough until January, so I've had to downgrade to just Maths and AS Further Maths due to time constraints. I'll be sitting the exams at my local secondary school this May and June.

    Next year, I'll be attending an independent centre where I can do fast-track English and the science subjects as well as the A2 Further Maths I missed out on doing this year.
    At an independent center? How is that going for you ? What are your grades like so far? Sorry to ask you all these questions.
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    The four Cs I got in GCSE were in English, Maths, and Double Science. My other GCSEs are Ds and Es. Those are my only formal qualifications so I have no other grades to speak of.

    I'm currently not attending any classes whatsoever. The only thing I've done is enter myself for the Maths and Further Maths A Level exams at my secondary school. As such, I'm responsible for my own maths education, and since I don't want to waste money on a tutor, I've been teaching myself entirely off the internet. It's one of the downsides to this approach, and I've run into several issues going down this route.

    The first issue was one of motivation. There is no one breathing down my neck to get anything done, there are no classes to attend and passively absorb knowledge from, and there are no deadlines to meet except for the exam dates, which seem quite far and distant. So it's extremely easy to procrastinate and fall behind schedule. It was for that reason that I had to downgrade to AS Further Maths. Luckily, I managed to get my act together in January and have been studying relatively on schedule since.

    The second issue is one of no teachers. My goal with doing A Levels is not to pass the exams, but to learn maths for the sake of learning and mastering it to the extent that A* grades naturally follow. However, the Edexcel specification is more focused on making sure you can do the maths rather than understanding it -- especially in calculus -- so I've found it extremely frustrating at times. With no teachers to have explain concepts and proofs to me, I have to turn to the internet and try and figure everything out myself.

    The next academic year, after my maths is done and over with, I'll be attending an independent centre where they provide tuition for fast-track A Levels as well as entering you for the exams. I have no choice in this matter since English and the sciences have a graded coursework and practical component which must be submitted to the exam board through a registered centre.
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    (Original post by Kasa)

    I also want to boost my academic qualifications to distract employers’ focus from my degree.
    Any thoughts?
    You can do this by writing a strong covering letter when applying for jobs. Most people have a very different understanding of the world and themselves when choosing what to study and employers will recognise this from their own experience.

    A large bulk of my education is in the performing arts but I've never worked in that field from my own choice. You don't have to be a square peg trying to fit into a round hole because finding work doesn't just come down to academic qualifications....employers look at you as a person and what hours you are available to work and your enthusiasm and previous work experience and interest in the job role and company and having a good attitude and being approachable.
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    (Original post by Kasa)
    I have an undergraduate degree already (read my venomous posts concerning my much hated degree) from a university. I have realised that my problems that were originally routed in choosing that degree stemmed from my a-levels; I had chosen my a-levels in an attempt to mould with my peers and my family members.
    This time, I want to choose a-levels that are more akin to my tastes at this present time. Hopefully, when i finish, I can progress onto a masters. I know this sounds crazy, but I have no proof of my academic merit. My degree marks are universally poor and my original a-levels marks are just mediocre.

    I was thinking about sitting them as an external candidate.
    I also want to boost my academic qualifications to distract employers’ focus from my degree.
    Any thoughts?
    What degree did you get and what overall classification?
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    (Original post by Kasa)
    I have an undergraduate degree already (read my venomous posts concerning my much hated degree)

    I was thinking about sitting them as an external candidate.
    I also want to boost my academic qualifications to distract employers’ focus from my degree.
    Any thoughts?
    If you want people to read posts about your degree give links.

    Some sixth form colleges will let you fast track a subject in a year.
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    What degree did you get and what overall classification?
    2:2 barely.
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    (Original post by Kasa)
    2:2 barely.
    What in?
    And what you want to do at PG?
    You can do an MSc with a 2.2...
    A levels will cost you A LOT.
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    (Original post by Quivai)
    The four Cs I got in GCSE were in English, Maths, and Double Science. My other GCSEs are Ds and Es. Those are my only formal qualifications so I have no other grades to speak of.

    I'm currently not attending any classes whatsoever. The only thing I've done is enter myself for the Maths and Further Maths A Level exams at my secondary school. As such, I'm responsible for my own maths education, and since I don't want to waste money on a tutor, I've been teaching myself entirely off the internet. It's one of the downsides to this approach, and I've run into several issues going down this route.

    The first issue was one of motivation. There is no one breathing down my neck to get anything done, there are no classes to attend and passively absorb knowledge from, and there are no deadlines to meet except for the exam dates, which seem quite far and distant. So it's extremely easy to procrastinate and fall behind schedule. It was for that reason that I had to downgrade to AS Further Maths. Luckily, I managed to get my act together in January and have been studying relatively on schedule since.

    The second issue is one of no teachers. My goal with doing A Levels is not to pass the exams, but to learn maths for the sake of learning and mastering it to the extent that A* grades naturally follow. However, the Edexcel specification is more focused on making sure you can do the maths rather than understanding it -- especially in calculus -- so I've found it extremely frustrating at times. With no teachers to have explain concepts and proofs to me, I have to turn to the internet and try and figure everything out myself.

    The next academic year, after my maths is done and over with, I'll be attending an independent centre where they provide tuition for fast-track A Levels as well as entering you for the exams. I have no choice in this matter since English and the sciences have a graded coursework and practical component which must be submitted to the exam board through a registered centre.
    Sounds awesome. Did you really have to motivate yourself then? How much were your fees?

    What in?
    Psychology and Economics.

    And what you want to do at PG?
    Preferably something like creative writing or something that gets me employed.

    You can do an MSc with a 2.2...
    Not anyone of the good ones.

    A levels will cost you A LOT.
    Not necessarily, I am paying for the exams only.
 
 
 
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