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    Discuss!
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    If it's something that's causing psychological harm or distress then yeah i guess. But it really depends on the problem. If someone has been a victim and has burns or scars on their face then yes definitely, but not if someone wants a mole on their cheek removed.

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    Massively depends, if someone has been in a horrific car crash or something then I think we should absolutely throw every max-fac we have at it. If someone wants a **** enlargement as they'd like a bigger ****, point them towards BUPA.

    If someone is suffering Psych illness and two psychs think cosmetic surgery will go a logn way to ending it then yes.
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    I think people here are confusing the reconstructive and the purely cosmetic.

    Given the cost of psychiatric care where cosmetic surgery can reduce the burden of disease elsewhere in the system I have no issue with it.
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    I am pretty sure everyone has something they would like to change on their body, it would be a floodgate situation and the NHS would end up with 15 million operations to perform. It's unsustainable and unless someone has a valid reason it's something to go private for.
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    (Original post by SSS_JJJ)
    Discuss!
    You lazy ****! why can't you give your opinion first?
    You couldn't be bothered to do research on this that's why you asked here :mad:
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    (Original post by AnushkasHero)
    You lazy ****! why can't you give your opinion first?
    You couldn't be bothered to do research on this that's why you asked here :mad:

    Seems like you cant grasp the concept of TSR, its for people to help each other not abuse each other. How do you know I have done no research? In fact how do you even know I need to do research? I'm just asking, to see the generalized view that medics and non medics carry of this..I'M not even a medic yet! I was just asking to compare views medics and health professionals would have, over non-health professionals. So maybe you should carry your stinking attitude somewhere else
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    If a lady came up to you, aged 21..(say you guys are GP's)(you lucky baskets!), and she said her small breasts were driving her to depression, anxiety and a serious lack of confidence! Would you guys refer her for surgery? ...remember there is nothing wrong with her health other than the depression she claims..she has not yet been clinically diagnosed with depression.
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    (Original post by SSS_JJJ)
    If a lady came up to you, aged 21..(say you guys are GP's)(you lucky baskets!), and she said her small breasts were driving her to depression, anxiety and a serious lack of confidence! Would you guys refer her for surgery? ...remember there is nothing wrong with her health other than the depression she claims..she has not yet been clinically diagnosed with depression.
    No I would not. The main issue here is her mental health (i.e. the depression and anxiety) so I would probably try and convince her to under go some CBT. Most likely she would refuse and not be very compliant, nevertheless I would leave that option open for her. In addition to this I would try to explain that even with the surgery, it would not solve this underlying problem of depression ect, it would just manifest in a different form in another part of her life. Again, she would disagree with this so the most likely outcome would be that she remain adamant about the surgery and she'll see another doctor. I would resist the urge to slap her across the face with my medical degree at this point.

    Depending on how persistent she is, she would find some old wash-up GP who would refer her to a specialist and when she meets this specialist, he/she would hopefully realise the real issue and reject the proposal for surgery.

    Ultimately, she would need to need to get it done privately because I'm sure that these private specialist would not worry too much about the mental health issues given that she pay them good money.
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    (Original post by AnushkasHero)
    No I would not. The main issue here is her mental health (i.e. the depression and anxiety) so I would probably try and convince her to under go some CBT. Most likely she would refuse and not be very compliant, nevertheless I would leave that option open for her. In addition to this I would try to explain that even with the surgery, it would not solve this underlying problem of depression ect, it would just manifest in a different form in another part of her life. Again, she would disagree with this so the most likely outcome would be that she remain adamant about the surgery and she'll see another doctor. I would resist the urge to slap her across the face with my medical degree at this point.

    Depending on how persistent she is, she would find some old wash-up GP who would refer her to a specialist and when she meets this specialist, he/she would hopefully realise the real issue and reject the proposal for surgery.

    Ultimately, she would need to need to get it done privately because I'm sure that these private specialist would not worry too much about the mental health issues given that she pay them good money.

    Thanks for that.
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    (Original post by SSS_JJJ)
    Thanks for that.
    nah, its cool dawg. I'm alway happy to help lol
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    Also, the issue of why people feel they need cosmetic surgery to be attractive should be addressed.
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    In general, no. While people are on waiting lists for operations to improve their quality of life (hip replacements etc), I can`t see why someone should get a nose or boob job for purely cosmetic reasons.
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    No! And that **** josie Cunningham needs to be killed.
    I will personally reward anyone who does the deed.
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    (Original post by SSS_JJJ)
    If a lady came up to you, aged 21..(say you guys are GP's)(you lucky baskets!), and she said her small breasts were driving her to depression, anxiety and a serious lack of confidence! Would you guys refer her for surgery? ...remember there is nothing wrong with her health other than the depression she claims..she has not yet been clinically diagnosed with depression.
    No as that's just her insecurities coming into play. I'd recommend a push-up bra if she's really desperate.
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    (Original post by cookiesandcream2)
    No! And that **** josie Cunningham needs to be killed.
    I will personally reward anyone who does the deed.

    haha, Yeh now she is an escort to pay the NHS back...she has a skin cancer scare and now realizes she shouldn't have wasted nhs money (she still wants a reduction the NHS though).
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    Assuming we're talking about Harley Street type cosmetic surgery as opposed to reconstructive plastic surgery, I think it's wrong to try to profit from people's (usually women's) insecurities and I have no respect for the surgeons involved in that line of work. I think they're sellouts and I think most of the patients would benefit more from improving their self-esteem instead.

    I could go on...but you get the point
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    (Original post by kwar16)
    If somebody feels depressed and down about their appearance so is therefore causing them great distress and psychological issues then it should be but only for cases where it is serious.
    It would be very difficult to judge though.
    Depression is a psychiatric issue, not a surgical one.
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    (Original post by SSS_JJJ)
    If a lady came up to you, aged 21..(say you guys are GP's)(you lucky baskets!), and she said her small breasts were driving her to depression, anxiety and a serious lack of confidence! Would you guys refer her for surgery? ...remember there is nothing wrong with her health other than the depression she claims..she has not yet been clinically diagnosed with depression.
    No, if after trying other treatments a psychiatrist concluded that was necessary and would help reduce the overall cost then yes.

    (Original post by Democracy)
    Assuming we're talking about Harley Street type cosmetic surgery as opposed to reconstructive plastic surgery, I think it's wrong to try to profit from people's (usually women's) insecurities and I have no respect for the surgeons involved in that line of work. I think they're sellouts and I think most of the patients would benefit more from improving their self-esteem instead.

    I could go on...but you get the point
    I think it's a bit harsh to say they're sellouts, suggests they ever believed in the ideal of using their skills for good to begin with, which I'm sure many didn't and just claimed they did in the way many lawyers will happily lay it on thick about doing justice for unis when in reality they want to be head of insolvency or something at some huge City firm.
 
 
 
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