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Why would vagotomy inhibit gastric emptying? I thought the point of the ENS was that it was independent of the CNS?
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(Original post by jsmith6131)
Why would vagotomy inhibit gastric emptying? I thought the point of the ENS was that it was independent of the CNS?
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Parasympathetic innervation is what drives gastrointestinal motility. The vagus nerve provides this parasympathetic supply to the stomach.
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(Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
Parasympathetic innervation is what drives gastrointestinal motility. The vagus nerve provides this parasympathetic supply to the stomach.
I thought the ENS did? what then is the function of the ENS?
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(Original post by jsmith6131)
I thought the ENS did? what then is the function of the ENS?
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The ENS is a bit weird as a physiological concept. The ANS co-ordinates with it, but it also has the ability to function independently. Gastric motility is has all sorts of neural and hormonal influences. The ENS is sort of a local control centre - it processes info from the GI tract, and acts on the GI tract. However, it's not the sole effector of GI activity. The parasympathetic nervous system has a significant contribution to this, too, via the vagus nerve (which has innervation from the pharynx all the way down to the proximal 2/3rds of the transverse colon). They both contribute to motility.
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(Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
The ENS is a bit weird as a physiological concept. The ANS co-ordinates with it, but it also has the ability to function independently. Gastric motility is has all sorts of neural and hormonal influences. The ENS is sort of a local control centre - it processes info from the GI tract, and acts on the GI tract. However, it's not the sole effector of GI activity. The parasympathetic nervous system has a significant contribution to this, too, via the vagus nerve (which has innervation from the pharynx all the way down to the proximal 2/3rds of the transverse colon). They both contribute to motility.
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