Extending WiFi to a detached garage?

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tomclarky
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Anyone with a decent knowledge of networking know the easiest and preferably cheapest way to extend my home WiFi network out to another building roughly 100 feet from my house? At the moment as soon as i step into my back garden the signal becomes very weak.

Running an ethernet cable across the garden is obviously the most reliable way of doing it but it seems like a bit of an effort and i'd have to pay some else to do it. I'm aware you can get wireless repeaters/range extenders to plug in around the house but i'm not sure these would be able to send the signal far enough outside.

Cheers.
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VexedM8
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By wireless repeaters, I'm not sure if you mean powerline adapters? These plug into the walls, one would go in the garage with an ethernet cable to the device and the other connected to your router via ethernet cable.
Pretty sure it uses the mains to send and receive signals. I'd recommend looking on Amazon and reading speeds and ranges in the description.

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mfaxford
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(Original post by VexedM8)
By wireless repeaters, I'm not sure if you mean powerline adapters? These plug into the walls, one would go in the garage with an ethernet cable to the device and the other connected to your router via ethernet cable.
Pretty sure it uses the mains to send and receive signals. I'd recommend looking on Amazon and reading speeds and ranges in the description.
You can get wireless repeaters which will pickup the signal from your wifi router and rebroadcast it (although you may find you don't get such a high speed if you're going via the repeater). This would need to be placed in a suitable place to be able to get a signal to the garage.

Powerline adapters may also work although may not be ideal due to the length of mains cable going to the garage. Personally I'm not that keen on them either. They've been demonstrated to not be particularly secure (probably about as secure as a wifi point with WEP) and potentially not legal as they cause more interference than they're allowed to (not that it's stopped them being sold / given away).
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Iqbal007
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(Original post by tomclarky)
Anyone with a decent knowledge of networking know the easiest and preferably cheapest way to extend my home WiFi network out to another building roughly 100 feet from my house? At the moment as soon as i step into my back garden the signal becomes very weak.

Running an ethernet cable across the garden is obviously the most reliable way of doing it but it seems like a bit of an effort and i'd have to pay some else to do it. I'm aware you can get wireless repeaters/range extenders to plug in around the house but i'm not sure these would be able to send the signal far enough outside.

Cheers.
Set up another router the side of the house closest to the outbuilding with antennas pointing towards there?
Or if the outbuilding uses the same power lines from the house, use powerline adapters and set up a router via that.
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tomclarky
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(Original post by Iqbal007)
Set up another router the side of the house closest to the outbuilding with antennas pointing towards there?
Or if the outbuilding uses the same power lines from the house, use powerline adapters and set up a router via that.

(Original post by VexedM8)
By wireless repeaters, I'm not sure if you mean powerline adapters? These plug into the walls, one would go in the garage with an ethernet cable to the device and the other connected to your router via ethernet cable.
Pretty sure it uses the mains to send and receive signals. I'd recommend looking on Amazon and reading speeds and ranges in the description.
Powerline adapters seem like a good idea. Any idea if it matters that the mains power in the garage has it's own fuse box? I've looked it up but the answers seem mixed.
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Iqbal007
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(Original post by tomclarky)
Powerline adapters seem like a good idea. Any idea if it matters that the mains power in the garage has it's own fuse box? I've looked it up but the answers seem mixed.
I wouldn't be too sure..........as long as the system is connected from the house it should work I believe, though performance will be done to the wiring.
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mfaxford
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(Original post by tomclarky)
Powerline adapters seem like a good idea. Any idea if it matters that the mains power in the garage has it's own fuse box? I've looked it up but the answers seem mixed.

(Original post by Iqbal007)
I wouldn't be too sure..........as long as the system is connected from the house it should work I believe, though performance will be done to the wiring.
That may depend on the fusebox but it probably won't cause a problem. The long run of cable to the garage may cause some issues and could make the connection less secure (There are various examples of people connecting to a neighbours PLT network because they end up transmitting the signal and the longer wires will act as an antenna making that easier).

Personally I'd look at using a wifi repeater first.
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ihavemooedtoday
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It's also possible to use a high gain directional antenna. Either a commercial one or DIY (there are many designs available online). People have used very high gain antennas to extend range of consumer routers to ~1 mile (across a pond).

One very important thing to know when choosing an antenna is what the gain actually means -
Antennas are passive devices, so by the law of conservation of energy, they cannot increase total power output from the router.

All antennas can do is to shape the radiation pattern, to radiate more energy in some directions than others. The gain of an antenna is the ratio of power in the strongest direction to power that would be radiated by a hypothetical antenna that radiates equally in all directions (no real world antennas behave like that, so it's purely hypothetical).

A high gain antenna just means it's more directional (narrower beam). Higher gain is not always better - it depends on the coverage required. Very high gain antennas require very precise aiming, because the beam is so narrow.

100 ft doesn't sound very far, though, assuming there are no metal walls between them. May be easier to just buy a higher powered router if you just happen to have a weak router.

Powerline ethernet only works when both sides are on the same circuit. If it has its own fusebox it most likely won't work.
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Clip
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You could be on a hiding if the garage has its own mains. Might be ok, depending on how the mains has been run. If it is an armoured that has been taken off a JB after the meter but before the consumer unit in the house - and then run into its own consumer unit in the garage - it will probably be ok - but not very good. If it's a separate phase (you can tell by it having a separate service fuse) it definitely won't work.

Powerline adaptors are a bodge at best. Either try a really good AP, or run a cable.
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tomclarky
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Cheers for the answers guys. Gonna give powerline adapters a go.
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