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    Hi i'm 21, I graduated in the summer with a 2:2 in Sport & Exercise Physiology, I understand that most uni's need at least a 2:1 grading and i feel unfortunate as i got 57.9% so not too far away! so my options for uni's are certainly limited!! Anyway my dilemma is I want to apply to medical schools for either the 14/15 or 15/16 academic year and basically I want to study local. I live in Wigan so anywhere North West would be fine and the medical schools I have looked at seem too far away! Nottingham, St Georges etc

    Advice/opinions anyone?

    Thanks
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    Way too late for the 14/15 entry and unless you have a fair amount of experience already you're bordering on too late for 15/16 entry.

    If you're serious about this you're going to need to be flexible with location, even in clinical years few schools have you in just the one place.

    Start with reading the Medicine Wiki on this site and check out medschoolonline.
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    There's no option available for you in North West. Only Nottingham, St Georges and Plymonth are available to you.
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    (Original post by Dannybro1)
    Hi i'm 21, I graduated in the summer with a 2:2 in Sport & Exercise Physiology, I understand that most uni's need at least a 2:1 grading and i feel unfortunate as i got 57.9% so not too far away! so my options for uni's are certainly limited!! Anyway my dilemma is I want to apply to medical schools for either the 14/15 or 15/16 academic year and basically I want to study local. I live in Wigan so anywhere North West would be fine and the medical schools I have looked at seem too far away! Nottingham, St Georges etc

    Advice/opinions anyone?

    Thanks

    You have to really think carefully about applying to a course that is academically rigours such as medicine if you didn't do too well in your previous degree. It's going to be a real struggle if you found a BSc degree tough to cope with.
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    (Original post by Dannybro1)
    Hi i'm 21, I graduated in the summer with a 2:2 in Sport & Exercise Physiology, I understand that most uni's need at least a 2:1 grading and i feel unfortunate as i got 57.9% so not too far away! so my options for uni's are certainly limited!! Anyway my dilemma is I want to apply to medical schools for either the 14/15 or 15/16 academic year and basically I want to study local. I live in Wigan so anywhere North West would be fine and the medical schools I have looked at seem too far away! Nottingham, St Georges etc

    Advice/opinions anyone?

    Thanks
    I think you should have researched this a bit more before you posted. The short answer for you is that you only have 2 options with a 2:2, and those are Nottingham or St Georges. You don't meet the academic requirements for any other GEP course.

    Not only that, but even if you did, GEP is extremely competitive and it's not as simple as just getting a North West school, you've got to accept that if you really want it you may have to move.

    Peninsula also accept a 2:2 onto their 5 year course, but that will cost you 1000s of pounds and again isn't where you want to live.

    At the expense of sound harsh, i also have to echo what was said above, if you got 58% in a Sport and Exercise degree, what makes you think you could hack the academic rigours of a medical degree? Where's your evidence of being academically capable? Do you have good A levels at least?

    You need to look at it from an admissions workers viewpoint, what makes you a better candidate than the 4 other guys vying for your spot with 2:1s/Firsts and a ton of work experience?
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    I don't think it's up to people to judge if someone will be able to meet the rigours of medicine or not. Especially given that medicine isn't that challenging academically, it's just the volume that gets people and that can be easily sorted out with good organisation. There's a reason why medical schools aren't asking for the strenuous grades and traditionally have never done so. If admission tutors ask for 2:2 that's all they want and you're not at any disadvantage than people with 2:1/ 1st.

    So I'd suggest OP discounts those points.
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    (Original post by 419)
    I don't think it's up to people to judge if someone will be able to meet the rigours of medicine or not. Especially given that medicine isn't that challenging academically, it's just the volume that gets people and that can be easily sorted out with good organisation. There's a reason why medical schools aren't asking for the strenuous grades and traditionally have never did so. If admission tutors ask for 2:2 that's all they want and you're not at any disadvantage than people with 2:1/ 1st.

    So I'd suggest OP discounts those points.
    This, though there are a few schools which rate your classification these are but a handful. For the vast majority a 2.1 or 2.2 is just a check box. For those that accept a 2.2 degree, the GAMSAT is what everyone is ranked on.
    I do think you should be able to reflect on why you got a 2.2 and your ability to pursue medicine at graduate level though. But I wouldn't let the classification itself deter you from applying.
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    (Original post by Zorg)
    This, though there are a few schools which rate your classification these are but a handful. For the vast majority a 2.1 or 2.2 is just a check box. For those that accept a 2.2 degree, the GAMSAT is what everyone is ranked on.
    I do think you should be able to reflect on why you got a 2.2 and your ability to pursue medicine at graduate level though. But I wouldn't let the classification itself deter you from applying.
    Well the fact that it limits OP to 3 potential options (only 2 really), and neither of them are in the north-west as he said he wanted, i think it's safe to say he probably should be deterred.

    Sometimes on this forum we have optimism for the sake of optimism. Unless OP is willing to move away to London or Nottingham, has good enough biology, chemistry, physics knowledge and the work ethic required to get a good GAMSAT score, and is willing to go out and get the required work experience, he doesn't have a chance.

    Maybe the OP has 3As in the sciences at A level, is already hitting the books for GAMSAT, and has a ton of work experience under his belt giving him insight into the job. However judging by the post, that seems unlikely.

    To be clear, i wasn't saying don't apply, i was saying think about it and research what it involves properly first, because it's going to take some work and the chances are slim.

    EDIT: Actually, forget "good", he needs a great GAMSAT score, as at Notts at least, people with 2:2s need to get 5 more points than people with 2:1s apparently. So the classification is relevant in that respect.
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    (Original post by 419)
    Especially given that medicine isn't that challenging academically, it's just the volume that gets people and that can be easily sorted out with good organisation.
    I agree, but whilst it isn't alway the most intellectually difficult material to understand, it requires a good deal of hard work and commitment to get through it all. The workload of medicine is no joke. That's what i meant by academic rigours.

    Getting a 2:1 in most degrees to be frank, doesn't require genius level intellect, and requires a moderate amount of hard work. I know plenty of people from a variety of unis that got 2:1s, myself included, and it's not that hard a thing to do. The fact OP got a 2:2 implies to me they probably didn't work as hard as they should have, and that would be an issue in Medicine.

    I realise i'm coming across as a bit of a **** here, but someone needs to be blunt about these sort of things.
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    I basically wanted to mirror what others have said in terms of competitiveness. As someone with an expected first class UG and excellent A-levels in related in subjects as well as relevant experience I looked in to it and was completely put off by how difficult it looks (the GAMSATs in particular are terrifying). I didn't have to do a tremendous amount of research to see that universities are (understandably) looking for students that excel.

    I believe the reason some unis are open to those with a 2:2 is only to give those with significant and relevant post graduating experience the opportunity to apply. As you are only 21 I would suggest if medicine is your passion then you will need to focus on achieving this before applying.
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    (Original post by hoonosewot)
    I agree, but whilst it isn't alway the most intellectually difficult material to understand, it requires a good deal of hard work and commitment to get through it all. The workload of medicine is no joke. That's what i meant by academic rigours.

    Getting a 2:1 in most degrees to be frank, doesn't require genius level intellect, and requires a moderate amount of hard work. I know plenty of people from a variety of unis that got 2:1s, myself included, and it's not that hard a thing to do. The fact OP got a 2:2 implies to me they probably didn't work as hard as they should have, and that would be an issue in Medicine.

    I realise i'm coming across as a bit of a **** here, but someone needs to be blunt about these sort of things.
    Quite right. His degree is hardly rigorous either. If it was a 2:2 in Maths, Physics or Chemistry (from a good university), I should lend him a little more credence. As it stands, I doubt his application would be competitive at any medical school.
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    (Original post by Caedus)
    Quite right. His degree is hardly rigorous either. If it was a 2:2 in Maths, Physics or Chemistry (from a good university), I should lend him a little more credence. As it stands, I doubt his application would be competitive at any medical school.
    Well i wouldn't go that far, he could make a competitive application, it would just be very difficult.

    Also, the quality of the university attended isn't taken into account by med schools, they just look at whether you've got a suitable classification. A common mistake graduate applicants make is to think that an Oxbridge degree will get them further in the process than one from London South Bank. Not true though (rightly or wrongly).
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    (Original post by Dannybro1)
    Hi i'm 21, I graduated in the summer with a 2:2 in Sport & Exercise Physiology, I understand that most uni's need at least a 2:1 grading and i feel unfortunate as i got 57.9% so not too far away! so my options for uni's are certainly limited!! Anyway my dilemma is I want to apply to medical schools for either the 14/15 or 15/16 academic year and basically I want to study local. I live in Wigan so anywhere North West would be fine and the medical schools I have looked at seem too far away! Nottingham, St Georges etc

    Advice/opinions anyone?

    Thanks
    With medicine, especially GEM.. You don't want to be applying with just a 2.2

    You're best bet would be to do masters, if you really want to do med then unfortuantely it's something you'll have to do to increase your chances.

    Notts & St George's both require the GAMSAT which definately needs an extensive revision period because it's really hard, and you don't want to pay a lot of money and not get you're desired result. I think you should do a masters, maybe if you do it at the uni you graduated from it'll be cheaper? even free?

    You need to sort out some work exp and top up your degree

    Hope this helps
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    I would say forget medicine and focus on something else, that's just my two cents.
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    (Original post by hoonosewot)
    Well i wouldn't go that far, he could make a competitive application, it would just be very difficult.

    Also, the quality of the university attended isn't taken into account by med schools, they just look at classification. A common mistake graduate applicants make is to think that.
    I cannot say that I am convinced. As medicine is a rather competitive course—both at undergrad and post grad—I believe a lot of emphasis would be placed on whether the candidate has demonstrated the ability required to undertake such a demanding degree. Good A-Levels, I suppose, may make up for any short short coming, however.
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    (Original post by Caedus)
    I cannot say that I am convinced. As medicine is a rather competitive course—both at undergrad and post grad—I believe a lot of emphasis would be placed on whether the candidate has demonstrated the ability required to undertake such a demanding degree. Good A-Levels, I suppose, may make up for any short short coming, however.
    Trust me, i e-mailed them all when i was applying, not a single one differentiates, they all have pretty rigid admissions procedures that assign points based on classification. Maybe it could unconsciously sway someone between 2 close candidates, but not to any major degree.

    The problem is that it's impossible for them to cut off at what point a uni is "good" or "bad", and then within universities you have some courses which are top in their field, and some which are total rubbish. It's just unworkable for them to try and differentiate.

    And as you said, asking for certain A-levels will differentiate to some degree, and in a more objective way. Though only about half of the GEP courses have any A-level requirements. Many just want a 2:1 and that's it in terms of academia.
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    ITT: People talking out of their arses about a subject they don't know about.

    Belittle his degree all you want. FYI many graduates from Kingston, Brunel etc. you know, the sort of ex-poly universities that TSR looks down upon are studying medicine.
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    (Original post by hoonosewot)
    I agree, but whilst it isn't alway the most intellectually difficult material to understand, it requires a good deal of hard work and commitment to get through it all. The workload of medicine is no joke. That's what i meant by academic rigours.

    Getting a 2:1 in most degrees to be frank, doesn't require genius level intellect, and requires a moderate amount of hard work. I know plenty of people from a variety of unis that got 2:1s, myself included, and it's not that hard a thing to do. The fact OP got a 2:2 implies to me they probably didn't work as hard as they should have, and that would be an issue in Medicine.

    I realise i'm coming across as a bit of a **** here, but someone needs to be blunt about these sort of things.
    I don't disagree with any of what you've said. But it isn't your position to judge. Maybe the OP lacked the motivation to do well in their degree. And I'm not trying to imply the OP will find it easy or being optimistic and overly positive about this. Many people that have got 2:2 in their previous degrees have gone on to do medicine and some are practising now so it's not like OP is unique and going through path many people haven't.

    His options are limited or non-existence if he doesn't want to out to NW but he can still do it.
    (Original post by SHOO)
    With medicine, especially GEM.. You don't want to be applying with just a 2.2

    You're best bet would be to do masters, if you really want to do med then unfortuantely it's something you'll have to do to increase your chances.

    Notts & St George's both require the GAMSAT which definately needs an extensive revision period because it's really hard, and you don't want to pay a lot of money and not get you're desired result. I think you should do a masters, maybe if you do it at the uni you graduated from it'll be cheaper? even free?

    You need to sort out some work exp and top up your degree

    Hope this helps
    Do not do a master solely to 'improve' your chance of getting into medicine school as a graduate. The only uni that it'll give you an advantage with is Kings (iirc).

    It offers no advantage whatsoever. If they don't ask for it, you don't need it.
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    Even with a 2:2 you will be going up against people who have 2:1s even 1sts in medicinal chemistry etc.

    Unless there was a specific reason you got a 2:2, ie was lazy or revised wrong stuff then I suggest you dont do medicine.
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    (Original post by 419)
    ITT: People talking out of their arses about a subject they don't know about.

    Belittle his degree all you want. FYI many graduates from Kingston, Brunel etc. you know, the sort of ex-poly universities that TSR looks down upon are studying medicine.
    Hope you're not including me in that, I'm an ex-poly grad myself, i know it's no disadvantage. Having a 2:2 is.
 
 
 
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