Noname24
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Hi there,

I'm currently studying Geography for my third and final year at the University of Nottingham; I graduate in June. I am contemplating undertaking a law conversion course but I have a few questions that need answering.

My overall ambition is to practice law in the USA, however, I'm a little mystified as to the process I must forgo in achieving this.
- I presume I must complete a GDL, then either an LPC or BPTC?
- Do I then seek to complete an LLM?
- Are there certain universities better suited in accomplishing this end goal?
- I understand there are different laws in different states, so what must be done to transfer to different states should I wish to do so?

I've done vague searches on Google but the forums seem to be the most informative. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

I thank you in advance.
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jelly1000
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(Original post by Noname24)
Hi there,

I'm currently studying Geography for my third and final year at the University of Nottingham; I graduate in June. I am contemplating undertaking a law conversion course but I have a few questions that need answering.

My overall ambition is to practice law in the USA, however, I'm a little mystified as to the process I must forgo in achieving this.
- I presume I must complete a GDL, then either an LPC or BPTC?
- Do I then seek to complete an LLM?
- Are there certain universities better suited in accomplishing this end goal?
- I understand there are different laws in different states, so what must be done to transfer to different states should I wish to do so?

I've done vague searches on Google but the forums seem to be the most informative. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

I thank you in advance.
Assuming you aren't a US passport holder:

If you really want to practice law in the US your best bet is to go and do graduate law school in the US. It won't solve the issue of getting a visa & job which is very tricky for foreigners as America likes to put its own people first in jobs, however it will solve the issue that options for someone with a foreign law degree are limited.

5 US states will consider applications for those foreign educated to sit their bar exams - they are New York, California, Alabama, New Hampshire and Virginia. The latter four expect all foreign educated citizens to undertake the LLM in America.. New York will grant exceptions, it says for those who've done 3 years of law study so I don't know if the GTP + LPC or BPTC will count.

A further 23 states will allow foreign educated people to work there after they have studied & worked in one of the five previously mentioned states. Not sure which ones.

Then a final 23 won't allow foreign educated people to practise law at all.

http://www.laurencesimons.com/intern...-united-states
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Noname24
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No, I am not a US passport holder.

The first option seems a little more risky; the idea of studying US law with no promise of a visa or job (and like you said its very tricky) could leave me with no foundations at home (England). Whereas the idea of completing a GDL and LPC in the UK, and then trying for an LLM in America, for me, seems more sensible.

The 5 US states you mentioned that will consider applications are the ones i'm interested in, particularly New York, California and later beautiful New Hampshire.

I will check out this website now, that's provided a good overall foresight - thank you!
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jelly1000
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(Original post by Noname24)
No, I am not a US passport holder.

The first option seems a little more risky; the idea of studying US law with no promise of a visa or job (and like you said its very tricky) could leave me with no foundations at home (England). Whereas the idea of completing a GDL and LPC in the UK, and then trying for an LLM in America, for me, seems more sensible.

The 5 US states you mentioned that will consider applications are the ones i'm interested in, particularly New York, California and later beautiful New Hampshire.

I will check out this website now, that's provided a good overall foresight - thank you!
That is true, as long as your aware that your options are limited that way then thats fine. You still have to do the LLM & bar exam in America with no guarentee of a job anyway thats probally two big enough risks. And just to make clear you have to sit an exam in each state- so if you go to New York you sit the New York bar, then if you want to move to New Hampshire then thats another bar exam you have to sit.
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Doc.Daneeka
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Best bet would be to work for a firm with offices in the US and to then suck the right D to get yourself sent over there. That was essentially the advice given to anyone planning on practising law in Hong Kong and it seems they are roughly similar in terms of competition and distaste for foreigners.
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