What paragraph technique(s) should you use to get an A* for GCSE English Literature

Watch
JAIYEKO
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
- I know about PEE being a C grade response, and if you include things like Writer's Intentions and Reader Interpretation, you will a high B grade.

-What should you include for an A*
0
reply
username1258398
Badges: 19
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
My school always taught us PEA (Point-Evidence-Analysis), and that's always gotten me A*s (well with some fiddling, like "PEAEA" - strange I know). The analysis just needs to be really developed and imaginative. Try and give multiple, alternative interpretations to your quotes, instead of just one idea. Also, once you've analysed your first quotation in the paragraph, try and drop in another short - maybe one-word - quote to back up your ideas.

And always link back to your introduction at the end of each paragraph!

EDIT:
Also, try to have a reflective, exploratory tone. Use phrases like "perhaps this suggests" or "this could reflect". Don't come across as too entrenched in your own ideas and closed off to others.
0
reply
JAIYEKO
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#3
(Original post by StrangeBanana)
My school always taught us PEA (Point-Evidence-Analysis), and that's always gotten me A*s (well with some fiddling, like "PEAEA" - strange I know). The analysis just needs to be really developed and imaginative. Try and give multiple, alternative interpretations to your quotes, instead of just one idea. Also, once you've analysed your first quotation in the paragraph, try and drop in another short - maybe one-word - quote to back up your ideas.

And always link back to your introduction at the end of each paragraph!

EDIT:
Also, try to have a reflective, exploratory tone. Use phrases like "perhaps this suggests" or "this could reflect". Don't come across as too entrenched in your own ideas and closed off to others.
Thank you very much, what do you mean linking back paragraph to introduction. Thanks
0
reply
username1258398
Badges: 19
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by JAIYEKO)
Thank you very much, what do you mean linking back paragraph to introduction. Thanks
No problem. I mean each of your paragraphs has to clearly be grounded in your intro. So you can have loads of ideas for each paragraph, but at the end of each one try and draw it all back into one or two ideas; these ideas should be the ones you talk about in your introduction.

Let's say the question is "How is Curley presented in Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men?", for example. Your introduction would describe how Curley is presented, so it would be something like:
"The character of Curley in John Steinbeck's novella, 'Of Mice and Men', is presented as a fierce, pugnacious man, valuing his wife only as a trophy, and always striving to assert dominance over the other ranch-workers."

Then your first paragraph would come, and then at its end you should try and sum up your analysis in that paragraph, re-wording one or some of the ideas in your introduction. For example, your last line might be:
"Thus, we see that Curley is desperate to assert superiority over his fellow men, and that perhaps it is this which is the driving force behind his constant pugnacity."

So at the end of that paragraph we link back to Curley's eagerness to dominate others, and his combative nature, two characteristics we base our introduction on. Then, in further paragraphs we could talk about how his desperate wish to rule over others is also reflected in his relationship with his wife (and in that we link back to his seeing his wife as a trophy, which we mention in the intro), et cetera.

I hope I explained that well enough!
0
reply
JAIYEKO
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#5
(Original post by StrangeBanana)
No problem. I mean each of your paragraphs has to clearly be grounded in your intro. So you can have loads of ideas for each paragraph, but at the end of each one try and draw it all back into one or two ideas; these ideas should be the ones you talk about in your introduction.

Let's say the question is "How is Curley presented in Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men?", for example. Your introduction would describe how Curley is presented, so it would be something like:
"The character of Curley in John Steinbeck's novella, 'Of Mice and Men', is presented as a fierce, pugnacious man, valuing his wife only as a trophy, and always striving to assert dominance over the other ranch-workers."

Then your first paragraph would come, and then at its end you should try and sum up your analysis in that paragraph, re-wording one or some of the ideas in your introduction. For example, your last line might be:
"Thus, we see that Curley is desperate to assert superiority over his fellow men, and that perhaps it is this which is the driving force behind his constant pugnacity."

So at the end of that paragraph we link back to Curley's eagerness to dominate others, and his combative nature, two characteristics we base our introduction on. Then, in further paragraphs we could talk about how his desperate wish to rule over others is also reflected in his relationship with his wife (and in that we link back to his seeing his wife as a trophy, which we mention in the intro), et cetera.

I hope I explained that well enough!
yes, thank you again ! I'm implying you're a English literature a-level student
0
reply
username1258398
Badges: 19
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report 7 years ago
#6
(Original post by JAIYEKO)
yes, thank you again ! I'm implying you're a English a-level student
Nope, I'm taking the GCSE exam in May, but I'm lucky enough to have a very good English teacher!
0
reply
JAIYEKO
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#7
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#7
(Original post by StrangeBanana)
Nope, I'm taking the GCSE exam in May, but I'm lucky enough to have a very good English teacher!
Oh right "What grades are you hoping for
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Would you give consent for uni's to contact your parent/trusted person in a mental health crisis?

Yes - my parent/carer (110)
33.95%
Yes - a trusted person (89)
27.47%
No (85)
26.23%
I'm not sure (40)
12.35%

Watched Threads

View All