AQA AS Civil Rights question help?

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tomfailinghelp
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'The growth of radicalism among African-Americans was important in helping them gain their civil rights during the 1960s.’
Explain why you agree or disagree with this view.'

This is the question; obviously it looks like a fairly easy one, but I've got a problem. The mark scheme doesn't include any stuff on the MFDP, The riots of 1964-1968 etc., all it suggests is stuff about how the NOI, and BP empowered blacks. But I don't really understand how that contributed to gaining civil rights? The Kerner Commission makes sense I guess, I can see how that would, but although I understand the importance of black pride, I don't really see how it translates into giving them civil rights because there wasn't any legislation in between the radicalisation of SNCC and CORE and the death of MLK that would suggest that they really achieved anything.

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Oddities
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Hiya!
I'm not on AQA for history, I'm on OCR, however I'm doing Civil Rights for A2. So you can take what you want from this...

~For the NOI and the BP (as well as figures like Malcolm X, and MLK)- you could suggest something along the lines that they empowered AA's by giving them a sense of community and want, rather than being seen as the scapegoat (think Jim Crow laws/ lynching). It gave their life some meaning (?)
~ It can be seen that the groups and leaders contributed to gaining civil rights because they made others aware of the discriminatory situation that they were in - however, this alienated some, but radicalised others.
~ Don't just focus on legislation - focus on social attitudes. A piece of legislation can be enacted, but it will only be enforced if social attitudes allow it. Likewise, social attitudes can lead to eventual change in legislation.
~ For achieving things - you have the CRA 1964 - which gave AA women the vote, but there was still grandfather clauses & literacy tests.
~ due to the revolution of the media and it being more accessible AA's could exploit the situation and show the world how they were treated

Hope this helps
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Sabzi97
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#3
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(Original post by tomfailinghelp)
'The growth of radicalism among African-Americans was important in helping them gain their civil rights during the 1960s.’
Explain why you agree or disagree with this view.'

This is the question; obviously it looks like a fairly easy one, but I've got a problem. The mark scheme doesn't include any stuff on the MFDP, The riots of 1964-1968 etc., all it suggests is stuff about how the NOI, and BP empowered blacks. But I don't really understand how that contributed to gaining civil rights? The Kerner Commission makes sense I guess, I can see how that would, but although I understand the importance of black pride, I don't really see how it translates into giving them civil rights because there wasn't any legislation in between the radicalisation of SNCC and CORE and the death of MLK that would suggest that they really achieved anything.

Help?
What I would say is that because the Black Power movement gave them a sense of pride, it made african americans determined to confront the south and do what they could to gain their constitutional rights- the sit ins, freedom rides, freedom summer were all confrontational in the SOUTH.
You could also talk about how the growth of radicalism frightened liberal America, especially the urban race riots, and that meant they forced Kennedy to consider an Act and Johnson to actually pass the 1964 and '65 Acts.
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