Online resources to learn basic math? Watch

thisisnew
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Hey guys! Hope I've posted in the right section... Anyway, I'm a little embarressed about this but hey, I won't get anywhere if I don't ask.

So basically, I became very ill at school and only left with GCSE's - even then they weren't that bad given the circumstances (mostly B's with some C's) but I got a D in maths which is really holding me back.

I'm trying to get on a teaching assistant course at college but they would like me to have a C+ in maths so I did a little test at college to see what level maths I could study at alongside and I did pretty poorly, not even GCSE level! It was level 1 or 2 or something.

Now, I don't want to wait years to bump up that D so I'm going to study online and take my maths externally. Does anybody know of any free, fairly basic online resources which start with the absolute basics (adding, subtracting, division etc) and progress from there? It's the basics I really failed at, completely forgot how to work things out

This BBC GCSE bitesize looks good but it doesn't seem too structured, more like pick and area and go, was wondering if there was something a bit more guided?

Thanks!
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Quivai
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(Original post by thisisnew)
Hey guys! Hope I've posted in the right section... Anyway, I'm a little embarressed about this but hey, I won't get anywhere if I don't ask.

So basically, I became very ill at school and only left with GCSE's - even then they weren't that bad given the circumstances (mostly B's with some C's) but I got a D in maths which is really holding me back.

I'm trying to get on a teaching assistant course at college but they would like me to have a C+ in maths so I did a little test at college to see what level maths I could study at alongside and I did pretty poorly, not even GCSE level! It was level 1 or 2 or something.

Now, I don't want to wait years to bump up that D so I'm going to study online and take my maths externally. Does anybody know of any free, fairly basic online resources which start with the absolute basics (adding, subtracting, division etc) and progress from there? It's the basics I really failed at, completely forgot how to work things out

This BBC GCSE bitesize looks good but it doesn't seem too structured, more like pick and area and go, was wondering if there was something a bit more guided?

Thanks!
For basic maths, I would recommend starting with the following sites:

Khan Academy
- Brilliant resource. You'll be using this for a long time.
Mathsisfun - Brilliant reference site. The infographic format makes everything easy to quickly look up.
BBC Bitesize - Not that good of a resource, to be honest, but there are differences between American English and British English at the lower levels of maths, and this will set you straight on the British lingo (e.g. "right-angled triangle" as opposed to the American "right triangle").

Once you move on to KS3 and GCSE maths, you'll want to add these to your list of resources to learn from:

m4ths - I haven't used this personally, but the owner is an active member of TSR.
HegartyMaths
- A resource tailored specifically towards passing exams in the British education system.
PurpleMath - A resource tailored specifically towards passing exams in the American education system.

And if you decide you want to continue on and study maths at A-Level:

ExamSolutions - The de-facto A-Level resource used by students everywhere.
MathTutor - Lectures by maths professors from the universities of Leeds, Coventry, and Loughborough.
BetterExplained - Insightful explanations of various maths topics.
PatrickJMT - Hundreds of videos designed for the American education system and which goes above and beyond the A Level syllabus and on to UK undergraduate calculus.

If you've discovered a passion for maths at this point and want to learn at undergraduate level:

MIT OpenCourseware - One of the best resources you'll come across.
EdX - Miscellaneous courses
Coursera - Miscellaneous courses
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thisisnew
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^ Absolutely brilliant, thank you so much!
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Quivai
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Oops, I forgot to add PatrickJMT.


(Original post by thisisnew)
^ Absolutely brilliant, thank you so much!
No problem. If you have the time and work hard enough, you can go from knowing only basic maths to being able to sit the entire A Level maths syllabus in just 1 year. I should know because it's exactly what I've been doing! I went from knowing only mental arithmetic and basic algebra in September, to studying Further Pure maths right now. So if you're in a rush to learn maths, know that it is definitely possible.
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silverpuma
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I would add to that excellent and very helpful list above http://m4ths.com

The site owner posts on this forum. Im midway through learning gcse maths and m4ths.com has been first rate. He has foundation level videos that for an oldcodger like me were a Godsend to refresh my tired memory and lay a solid foundation for my journey. I find him very clear and thorough. Hope you do well even better than you expect
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Mr M
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(Original post by thisisnew)
not even GCSE level! It was level 1 or 2 or something.
Assuming you are not talking about Entry Level, Level 1 and Level 2 tests are the same standard at GCSE.

Level 1 is equivalent to grades D to G.

Level 2 is equivalent to grades A* to C.
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Kvothe the Arcane
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(Original post by Quivai)
For basic maths, I would recommend starting with the following sites:

Khan Academy
- Brilliant resource. You'll be using this for a long time.
Mathsisfun - Brilliant reference site. The infographic format makes everything easy to quickly look up.
BBC Bitesize - Not that good of a resource, to be honest, but there are differences between American English and British English at the lower levels of maths, and this will set you straight on the British lingo (e.g. "right-angled triangle" as opposed to the American "right triangle").

Once you move on to KS3 and GCSE maths, you'll want to add these to your list of resources to learn from:

HegartyMaths
- A resource tailored specifically towards passing exams in the British education system.
PurpleMath - A resource tailored specifically towards passing exams in the American education system.

And if you decide you want to continue on and study maths at A-Level:

ExamSolutions - The de-facto A-Level resource used by students everywhere.
MathTutor - Lectures by maths professors from the universities of Leeds, Coventry, and Loughborough.
BetterExplained - Insightful explanations of various maths topics.
PatrickJMT - Hundreds of videos designed for the American education system and which goes above and beyond the A Level syllabus and on to UK undergraduate calculus.

If you've discovered a passion for maths at this point and want to learn at undergraduate level:

MIT OpenCourseware - One of the best resources you'll come across.
EdX - Miscellaneous courses
Coursera - Miscellaneous courses
Great post!!!
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Quivai
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(Original post by silverpuma)
I would add to that excellent and very helpful list above http://m4ths.com

The site owner posts on this forum. Im midway through learning gcse maths and m4ths.com has been first rate. He has foundation level videos that for an oldcodger like me were a Godsend to refresh my tired memory and lay a solid foundation for my journey. I find him very clear and thorough. Hope you do well even better than you expect
Thanks. I'll add this site to the list. The sites I initially listed are only the ones I've personally discovered and made extensive use of.

The way I self-studied was to skip GCSE maths entirely and dive straight into A Level maths. Every time I encountered a gap in my knowledge, I would go back and fill it in using the other resources mentioned before returning to the A Level standard whereupon the same thing would occur anew. I preferred studying this way as it let all the basic maths I learned fit into the context of A Level, which meant that I got to see the bigger picture sooner instead of wondering what use a particular bit of maths might have. Plus, since a lot of the higher GCSE maths are taken as prerequisite knowledge in A Level, they kept popping up everywhere, meaning I became good at them just by earnestly trying to learn the A Level maths!

For this reason, I know very few resources for KS3 and GCSE maths. I almost exclusively made use of PurpleMath for GCSE knowledge. I didn't discover hegartymaths (for Decision 1) until I had already filled in the gaps in my knowledge.

Just a note, but the method I used to self-study isn't for everyone. It requires a level of persistence and desire to understand that a lot of people may not have. It's quite unfortunate, but many seem to be interested in only passing the exam rather than spending time to learn all the intricacies of maths.
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hellodave5
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(Original post by thisisnew)
Hey guys! Hope I've posted in the right section... Anyway, I'm a little embarressed about this but hey, I won't get anywhere if I don't ask.

So basically, I became very ill at school and only left with GCSE's - even then they weren't that bad given the circumstances (mostly B's with some C's) but I got a D in maths which is really holding me back.

I'm trying to get on a teaching assistant course at college but they would like me to have a C+ in maths so I did a little test at college to see what level maths I could study at alongside and I did pretty poorly, not even GCSE level! It was level 1 or 2 or something.

Now, I don't want to wait years to bump up that D so I'm going to study online and take my maths externally. Does anybody know of any free, fairly basic online resources which start with the absolute basics (adding, subtracting, division etc) and progress from there? It's the basics I really failed at, completely forgot how to work things out

This BBC GCSE bitesize looks good but it doesn't seem too structured, more like pick and area and go, was wondering if there was something a bit more guided?

Thanks!
I really recommend Kahn Academy.
Great resource.
Hope it helps

EDIT: Thought id provide address. Easy to sign up with Facebook

https://www.khanacademy.org/
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silverpuma
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I'm scooting out for a few hours Quivai but I'll be back with some comments and an advice request you may be help me on....thanks
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