Dynamo123
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What possible role can SSRI play in pica disorder? I have read a case history, in which the patient was suffering from pica secondary to depression. But I read elsewhere that SSRI can be used as a generalized medication for Pica. How? Not every pica case is associated with depression?
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LiquidCherry
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(Original post by Dynamo123)
What possible role can SSRI play in pica disorder? I have read a case history, in which the patient was suffering from pica secondary to depression. But I read elsewhere that SSRI can be used as a generalized medication for Pica. How? Not every pica case is associated with depression?

The answer possibly lies in the fact that we don't fully understand the psychopharmacological relationship between antidepressants and depression. Various drugs seem effective in depression,SSRIs being the most recommended and well tolerated in patients. But it still isn't clear how inhibiting serotonin re-uptake actually reduces depression. For example, serotonin levels in the brain rise within 48 hours of taking an SSRI, yet antidepressant activity does not begin to work until 2-6 weeks. Why? We don't really know.

Likewise, how an SSRI can modify OCD (such as that linked to pica) is also unclear.

SSRIs are prescribed and licensed for use in not just depression, but OCD, social-anxiety disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, eating disorders and post-traumatic stress syndrome.

If you're seeking peer-reviewed articles, may I suggest pubmed?
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Revenged
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It depends on the reasons why the behaviour is done. I think Behavioural therapy is normally first line. Most of the time it is teenagers who do it to get attention from their parents and medication is inappropriate and doesn't adress the route cause. Often though it is not done for attention and is secondary to anxiety / depression where behavioural therapy is less effective and ssri would be more effective.
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Dynamo123
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(Original post by LiquidCherry)
The answer possibly lies in the fact that we don't fully understand the psychopharmacological relationship between antidepressants and depression. Various drugs seem effective in depression,SSRIs being the most recommended and well tolerated in patients. But it still isn't clear how inhibiting serotonin re-uptake actually reduces depression. For example, serotonin levels in the brain rise within 48 hours of taking an SSRI, yet antidepressant activity does not begin to work until 2-6 weeks. Why? We don't really know.

Likewise, how an SSRI can modify OCD (such as that linked to pica) is also unclear.

SSRIs are prescribed and licensed for use in not just depression, but OCD, social-anxiety disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, eating disorders and post-traumatic stress syndrome.

If you're seeking peer-reviewed articles, may I suggest pubmed?
(Original post by Revenged)
It depends on the reasons why the behaviour is done. I think Behavioural therapy is normally first line. Most of the time it is teenagers who do it to get attention from their parents and medication is inappropriate and doesn't adress the route cause. Often though it is not done for attention and is secondary to anxiety / depression where behavioural therapy is less effective and ssri would be more effective.
Thanks I was reading a review article on MedScape, in which they said that SSRI had been reported as a psychopharmacological medication in only one case. Mostly, Pica must be characterized on the basis of its form, and then a search must be carried out for any underlying depression.

Thanks
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