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Ellie4
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Anyone here applying to one of the American Ivy League Universities? I've thought about Harvard, but the whole ACT and SATs thing seems like a lot of work, and it's very expensive. Anyone know more about the procedure?
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bananaman
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(Original post by Ellie4)
Anyone here applying to one of the American Ivy League Universities? I've thought about Harvard, but the whole ACT and SATs thing seems like a lot of work, and it's very expensive. Anyone know more about the procedure?
Do you have more money than sense?
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Ellie4
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(Original post by bananaman)
Do you have more money than sense?
Um.. no. I have always contemplated the idea of going to uni in the US though, and wondered if anyone else had.
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hornblower
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(Original post by Ellie4)
Um.. no. I have always contemplated the idea of going to uni in the US though, and wondered if anyone else had.
I was contemplating the idea myself. However, a quick browse on their web sites later I realised that I'd be much happier going for Oxbridge. If I did go to the USA, it would be to do research after my first degree.
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theone
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Many Unis, including Cambridge in certain subjects, offer years abroad to good American universitites. Always worth bearing in mind...

BTW, the competition for Harvard in particular is sick. A person, an american, i knew who lived 10 mins from Harvard told me you have to have achieved something extraordinary, way way above your expected level to get in. This may or may not be true, but I know of a maths applicant to Harvard this year and he appears to have completed all of a normal Maths degree over here already, and has proved new theories...
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username9816
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(Original post by theone)
Many Unis, including Cambridge in certain subjects, offer years abroad to good American universitites. Always worth bearing in mind...

BTW, the competition for Harvard in particular is sick. A person, an american, i knew who lived 10 mins from Harvard told me you have to have achieved something extraordinary, way way above your expected level to get in. This may or may not be true, but I know of a maths applicant to Harvard this year and he appears to have completed all of a normal Maths degree over here already, and has proved new theories...
That is scary.
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Ellie4
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Maybe I'll stick to the UK then!
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kosine90
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(Original post by theone)
Many Unis, including Cambridge in certain subjects, offer years abroad to good American universitites. Always worth bearing in mind...

BTW, the competition for Harvard in particular is sick. A person, an american, i knew who lived 10 mins from Harvard told me you have to have achieved something extraordinary, way way above your expected level to get in. This may or may not be true, but I know of a maths applicant to Harvard this year and he appears to have completed all of a normal Maths degree over here already, and has proved new theories...
that's sort of true... a lot of these people take classes in college in addition to their normal high school classes :rolleyes:
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sorceress84
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One of my best friends goes to Harvard. The top unis in the US pay a lot of attention to factors other than your academic achievements. For example, my friend did a lot of activities that showed leadership/confidence. He was on the debate team and he was also very active in school drama. Of course he's also always been an extremely good student, but it's not like he proved any new theories or anything! In fact, he didn't even get straight A/A*'s in his GCSE's. But he's extremely bright and his application presented him as a very well-rounded student (top grades, great teacher recommendations, interesting extra-curricular activities, involvement in activities outside school, good application essays and a 1500+ SAT score). He's also naturally charming and I think that helped him a lot in his interview. Anyway, I'm just saying that you don't have to be the next Einstein to get into Harvard. They just want well-rounded students, who are talented in more ways than one. The competition for a place at Harvard is stiff though - 1 in 10 get admitted and even less for international students. Something like 2% I believe. But it's worth trying if you've got the $. By the way, my friend also applied to other Ivy League schools like Yale and Princeton, but didn't get in. Got into Cambridge though.
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ericsimo
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As you might imagine, being the world's most prestigious university, Harvard attracts applicants of many different sorts. Due to the volume of applications they receive, they can pick and choose which ones that fit a sort of niche in their school. For example, my one friend was a pretty good American Football and Baseball player (but by no means good enough to play for Harvard), was an A student, 1450 on SATS, but knew 3 languages in addition to English. He also played the oboe. He was admitted. My other friend achieved 1580 on the SATS, was a mediocre rower, captain of the debate team, took college courses his senior year, but was flat out rejected.

I guess Harvard needed an oboe player
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yawn1
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(Original post by Ellie4)
Anyone here applying to one of the American Ivy League Universities? I've thought about Harvard, but the whole ACT and SATs thing seems like a lot of work, and it's very expensive. Anyone know more about the procedure?
Contact the Fulbright Commission on 0207 404 6994 Mon - Fri 1.30 - 5pm.

Or e-mail: [email protected]

They will give you all the information you could possibly ask for - and it will be correct!
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hornblower
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(Original post by ericsimo)
As you might imagine, being the world's most prestigious university, Harvard...
I have to disagree on that one.

Oxbridge! Oxbridge! Oxbridge!
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Magie
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This year about 220 British students applied to Harvard and 30 got in.
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Ellie4
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(Original post by Magie)
This year about 220 British students applied to Harvard and 30 got in.
So there were about, what, 7-8 people per place. Similar to Oxbridge then. Hmm...
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yawn1
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(Original post by Ellie4)
So there were about, what, 7-8 people per place. Similar to Oxbridge then. Hmm...
Not similar to Oxbridge. The ratio to Harvard would be greater on the figures quoted.
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anguman
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Yes I am applying to 4 American Universities this year (HYP and Columbia). I asked my parents. They had no apprehensions about me applying as long as I can get some financial aid. 60% of international students get need based finaicial aid to study at the Ivy League. I am also applying to 6 in the UK so I have 10 applications altogether. I want to experience University life in America and considering British students make up the third highest international student ratio at Yale, I won't be the only person from England there (if I get in of course!)
SATs and SAT IIs are a somewhat irksome procedure but they still need to be done. One of my friends was admitted into Harvard last year to read History. He couldn't recommend it any higher so I thought I should give it a shot and see what happens.
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yawn1
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I assume that any British student who gains a place to read for a degree in one of the Ivy League unis would have no problem getting a job back in Britain.

However, would there be difficulties having your US degree from lesser known universites being given educational parity with a degree from a British uni if you sought work back home after graduating?
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VoodooDoll
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(Original post by yawn1)
would there be difficulties having your US degree from lesser known universites being given educational parity with a degree from a British uni if you sought work back home after graduating?
i'd imagine there might be, especially if it's somewhere that not many people in england have heard of. of course, i'm sure employers are well informed about theese things, but i can't help thinking if you can't get into a famous american uni then i might hinder employment prospects if you come back to work in the uk.

just out of interest, how much roughly does it cost to study in the US? after my degree i might be interested in doing a PhD and i'd definately consider going to an american uni if i could get a grant...
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shiny
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At Harvard, something in the region of $30,000/year.
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africa
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(Original post by bono)
he appears to have completed all of a normal Maths degree over here already, and has proved new theories...
Yes the capacities of Ivy candidates are often amazing. Read www.confidential.com... often they put their CVs up there. Most have been editors of school magazines, have had spectacular soprting careers and yet still have taken extra higher level courses. Many will have done several APs in 5th form, the equivlqnet of A-Levels. Many will also have have travelled extensively.

What interests me is the extent to which they all engage in charitiable activities. Tell trying an Ivy that you don't believe in charity, but in good old social welfare, let alone revolution. I don't think that would go down well.
Most students who are able to get together the massive quantity of paperwork must have extensive help. That, plus the fees, means they are mostly very well-healed. Not revolutionaries. This turns the Amercian Ivies into arch conservaitvie institutions wiht self-perpetuating cliques (a bit like Oxbridge, but worse). Ugggh.
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