lawgal122
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
how do I answer a problem question on mistake????????????????
0
reply
GrandPessimist
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
Ermmm, you just answer it??? You know, write down what the question asks you??
0
reply
lawgal122
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#3
Wat I meant is how u structure it
0
reply
Revel
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
(Original post by lawgal122)
Wat I meant is how u structure it
Exactly how you'd structure any other Law essay? Use legal points and cases to back up your arguments... :confused:
0
reply
lawgal122
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#5
(Original post by Revel)
Exactly how you'd structure any other Law essay? Use legal points and cases to back up your arguments... :confused:
lol i feel so thick when it's comes to contract.

How many topics would they put in the problem question for contract ? They wouldn't put all 8 so which ones are the main ones for me to revise.
Thanks
0
reply
Revel
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
(Original post by lawgal122)
lol i feel so thick when it's comes to contract.

How many topics would they put in the problem question for contract ? They wouldn't put all 8 so which ones are the main ones for me to revise.
Thanks
Well having only done one unit of Contract Law in A Level, I only know of problems with:

- Formation of a Contract
- Offer and Acceptance
- Breach of a Contract (UCTA/UCTTR/SOGA/SOGSA)
- Misrepresentation
- Discharge/Frustration


The above may not be relevant to you, because they are A Level topics, and you're doing degree-level Law.
I would, however, advise that you revise all eight topics. Do not play the guessing game, assuming that the topics you didn't revise will not come up, because more often than not, you'll be wrong.
0
reply
lawgal122
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#7
Thanks for the help Revel
0
reply
GrandPessimist
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#8
Report 6 years ago
#8
(Original post by Revel)
Well having only done one unit of Contract Law in A Level, I only know of problems with:

- Formation of a Contract
- Offer and Acceptance
- Breach of a Contract (UCTA/UCTTR/SOGA/SOGSA)
- Misrepresentation
- Discharge/Frustration


The above may not be relevant to you, because they are A Level topics, and you're doing degree-level Law.
I would, however, advise that you revise all eight topics. Do not play the guessing game, assuming that the topics you didn't revise will not come up, because more often than not, you'll be wrong.
You can do that at A-level, but you cannot do at a degree level!! There is simply not enough time to revise everything and know them very well so that you can get a high mark.
0
reply
GrandPessimist
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#9
Report 6 years ago
#9
(Original post by lawgal122)
Thanks for the help Revel
How many topics do you have to revise and how many questions you have to answer at your exam and how many questions will the paper have?

Have you seen any past papers and more importantly have you practised writing any?

For example, at my uni, we are asked to answer to 3 questions out of 6 in two hours. Therefore, I have revised 5 topics. However, I know them well enough so that I could answer both a problem question on them and an essay question.

If you have the time to revise the entire module well enough then by all means do it. But in my experience, and from what I have heard from other students in the second and third year, if you have limited time, then revise specific topics so that you can do well enough at the questions.

If you have 10 topics to revise, e.g. offer & acceptance, consideration, estoppel, misrepresentation, intention, privity, duress, illegality, mistake, exemption clauses etc. and you have 1 week to prepare and you decide to learn everything, chances are you will not score high, because you will have probably covered them superficially...
0
reply
Revel
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#10
Report 6 years ago
#10
(Original post by GrandPessimist)
You can do that at A-level, but you cannot do at a degree level!! There is simply not enough time to revise everything and know them very well so that you can get a high mark.
There is if you want it enough.
You think people with firsts achieve it by only studying half of the course?
0
reply
GrandPessimist
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#11
Report 6 years ago
#11
(Original post by Revel)
There is if you want it enough.
You think people with firsts achieve it by only studying half of the course?
People with firsts achieve it because they target specific topics and learn them inside out knowing every important case and the leading and dissenting judgments, analyse the principles correctly providing critique of the law, where appropriate, and learn from year one how to master the exam technique.

All the final year students I've met, who said they got firsts in their second year, made the exact same point. You CANNOT revising everything because there is not enough time! You can revise specific topics and know them impeccably well, or revise everything and risk having little time to be able to practise enough so that you can provide your own arguments. To get a first, you need to show that you can think independently. To think independently you need to take time to sit down and evaluate on the law. Find arguments. Find sources to support your arguments.

The lecturers I've asked said the same thing. We would like you to revise at least 90% of the module, but sometimes this is not possible. You have to see your strengths and your weaknesses and decide realistically.

What you are saying may work for A-levels, but it definitely doesn't work for university.
0
reply
lawgal122
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#12
(Original post by GrandPessimist)
How many topics do you have to revise and how many questions you have to answer at your exam and how many questions will the paper have?

Have you seen any past papers and more importantly have you practised writing any?

For example, at my uni, we are asked to answer to 3 questions out of 6 in two hours. Therefore, I have revised 5 topics. However, I know them well enough so that I could answer both a problem question on them and an essay question.

If you have the time to revise the entire module well enough then by all means do it. But in my experience, and from what I have heard from other students in the second and third year, if you have limited time, then revise specific topics so that you can do well enough at the questions.

If you have 10 topics to revise, e.g. offer & acceptance, consideration, estoppel, misrepresentation, intention, privity, duress, illegality, mistake, exemption clauses etc. and you have 1 week to prepare and you decide to learn everything, chances are you will not score high, because u will have probably covered them superficially...
Well I have 8 topics to learn ! Have 6 weeks today left for my exam. The set out of our exam is 50% multiple choice, we have 2 problem questions from we pick one and four essay questions and we pick one each worth 25%.
0
reply
GrandPessimist
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#13
Report 6 years ago
#13
(Original post by lawgal122)
Well I have 8 topics to learn ! Have 6 weeks today left for my exam. The set out of our exam is 50% multiple choice, we have 2 problem questions from we pick one and four essay questions and we pick one each worth 25%.
Do you have any other exams during these 6 weeks?

You exam format is very different than mine. At my uni we get 6 questions, 3 essays usually and 3 problems, although they keep changing it, and we have to answer ANY 3 questions.

The multiple choice is easy, but I suppose it could cover tricky areas of the entire module, so I think that you might have to revise everything after all.
0
reply
lawgal122
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#14
(Original post by GrandPessimist)
Do you have any other exams during these 6 weeks?

You exam format is very different than mine. At my uni we get 6 questions, 3 essays usually and 3 problems, although they keep changing it, and we have to answer ANY 3 questions.

The multiple choice is easy, but I suppose it could cover tricky areas of the entire module, so I think that you might have to revise everything after all.
Yeah I have other exams too. I hate contract law !!!!
0
reply
GrandPessimist
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#15
Report 6 years ago
#15
(Original post by lawgal122)
Yeah I have other exams too. I hate contract law !!!!
Don't have this attitude. See it as an opportunity to learn. I am not very fond of criminal law, and thinking that I am doing this to learn helped me more rather than thinking I will have to study this and that for the exam and I will fail because I hate it etc...

Make a plan, stick to it, work hard and your effort will pay off!

Or at least you will know that you tried your best!

GOOD LUCK!
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should there be a new university admissions system that ditches predicted grades?

No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers (627)
33.67%
Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA) (784)
42.11%
Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO) (368)
19.76%
I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread!) (83)
4.46%

Watched Threads

View All