B652 - Sustainable Education Bill 2014

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Jarred
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B652 - Sustainable Education Bill 2014, TSR Government

Sustainable Education Act 2014
An Act to ensure that [I]all young people are being informed about the importance of being a responsible citizen and understand the real issues that face the next generation, in response to the harmful changes implemented by the current government and in light of climate reports.

1. Changes to the KS2 Curriculum
1.1. All pupils in KS2 will be taught about Climate Change as a specific topic, as a component of Geography/Humanities.
1.2. Pupils should understand the significance of the potential consequences of Climate Change.
1.3. Pupils should understand that the current scientific consensus is overwhelmingly in favour of the idea that the Climate Change we observe today is largely anthropogenic.
1.4. Pupils should understand the concept of a 'carbon footprint' and should know a few basic ways to reduce their carbon footprint, eg energy-saving lightbulbs and house insulation.
1.5. Pupils will not be expected to know the specific mechanisms of Climate Change.
1.6. Climate Change itself must be presented as a scientific fact.
1.7. It must be made clear that there is a scientific consensus with respect to anthropogenic climate change.
1.8. Teachers may educate students about the debate surrounding anthropogenic climate change, as long as 1.7 is adhered to.
1.9. A minimum of five hours is required to teach this topic, although schools may allocate more hours and/or use excursions/incursions to enhance learners' understanding.
1.10. This knowledge is not assessed through summative examinations.

2. Changes to the KS3 Curriculum
2.1. All pupils in KS3 are taught about Climate Change as a specific topic in Geography, as well as through the Sciences (specifically Chemistry).
2.2. The KS3 Climate Change curriculum is build on the background knowledge obtained from KS2.
2.3. Pupils are taught the basic mechanisms of Climate Change.
2.4. Pupils are taught that the climate has always undergone change, but the drastic changes that we see today and expect to see in the future is influenced by the activities of humanity.
2.5. Pupils learn a variety of ways that humans contribute to Climate Change, at regional, national, and international levels.
2.6. An emphasis is placed on the importance on sustainability, specifically with respect to the idea that our society at the moment is unsustainable and will not be able to continue in the current manner for good.
2.7. Pupils are given the opportunity to learn about the wider debate surrounding Climate Change, but specific attention are drawn to the fact that there is an overwhelming consensus on anthropogenic climate change. Pupils may discuss the reasons why there is so much inaction and lack of understanding in the public domain.
2.8. Pupils explore ideas how they can contribute to combating Climate Change.
2.9. Specifically, the emphasis should be on the socio-economic impacts and causes of Climate Change, rather than the science since this is covered in Science.

3. Changes to the KS4 Curriculum
3.1. Every GCSE Science specification must cover at least the basics of the causes of Climate Change, the debate (and consensus), the potential effects, as well as the meaning and implications of the concept of sustainability. This is to ensure that all learners are assessed on basic knowledge of Climate Change and sustainability since Geography is not compulsory at GCSE.
3.2. Each pupil needs only cover this topic once. That is, the topic appears in the Single Science and Double Science specifications, but only has to appear in the Chemistry specification in the Triple Science course.

4. Enforcement
4.1. Schools that do not ensure that the above points are adequately covered face the same action as with failures to teach all other elements of the National Curriculum.

5. Commencement, Short Title, and Extent
5.1. Articles 1-2 comes into force from September 2014.
5.2. Article 3 comes into force from September 2015 (to first be examined in Summer 2017).
5.3. The Act may be cited as Sustainable Education Act 2014.
5.4. The Act extends across all schools that are normally required to follow the National Curriculum.

Notes
This Act is in response to the changes implemented by the Conservative Government with respect to the inclusion of Climate Change in the KS1-3 Curricula (and to a recent UN report on climate change). In the new revised National Curriculum, Climate Change will not be taught as a specific topic. There is not a single mention of Climate Change (or similar) in the KS2 curriculum. In Geography KS3, students will learn about climate systems but not about climate change, which is absolutely shocking given that Climate Change is arguably the most important geographical issue facing us at the moment. The KS3 Curriculum for Science includes references to how Carbon Dioxide is produced by humans and potential impacts it can have on the climate, but it is incredibly vague and goes into not nearly enough detail.


In practice, many schools will teach Climate Change in Geography at KS3 since it is an important foundation for the GCSE course (which does include Climate Change). However, the fact of the matter is that, with the new NC, Students will technically be able to pass through the state school system with next to no knowledge of anthropogenic Climate Change and its significance. This Act is necessary, at the very least, as a matter of principle. The future generation has to understand the crucial importance of sustainability and the impact of our lifestyles on the planet if our society is to have any longevity.

Sources:
Imperial College London
BBC
Letter from Elizabeth Truss MP
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-24296204

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Baron of Sealand
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Thank you Mr Speaker.

Aye obviously.
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barnetlad
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Aye. What are UKIPs' views on this, given the views some of their members have espoused?
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bun
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It would be an aye from me, in that I think it's necessary for it to be discussed, and it's necessary to educate on how to reduce carbon footprint etc.

It's not necessary to introduce it as pretty much a new subject.
I think you'll actually have the scenario of making people care about it less.
It gets rammed down your throat in just about every subject -and certainly that's one of the reasons I simply couldn't care less about it now.

all modern languages, Geography, all 3 sciences, etc etc. Huge sections devoted to frigging climate change.

If this bill was to take the stupid climate change element OUT of these subjects, and create a standalone component of geography alone, then it would have my full backing. But just to be increasing the amount of how much this topic is taught, it's a no from me.
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Hum, I also can see the huge emphasis on climate change...
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Thank you Mr Speaker and the honourable gentleman for expressing his opinion.

(Original post by bun)
It would be an aye from me, in that I think it's necessary for it to be discussed, and it's necessary to educate on how to reduce carbon footprint etc.

It's not necessary to introduce it as pretty much a new subject.
I think you'll actually have the scenario of making people care about it less.
It gets rammed down your throat in just about every subject -and certainly that's one of the reasons I simply couldn't care less about it now.

all modern languages, Geography, all 3 sciences, etc etc. Huge sections devoted to frigging climate change.

If this bill was to take the stupid climate change element OUT of these subjects, and create a standalone component of geography alone, then it would have my full backing. But just to be increasing the amount of how much this topic is taught, it's a no from me.
May I clarify if you mean a nay?

This is not to make schools teach them more, but more systematically and make sure they do.
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bun
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(Original post by clh_hilary)
Thank you Mr Speaker and the honourable gentleman for expressing his opinion.



May I clarify if you mean a nay?

This is not to make schools teach them more, but more systematically and make sure they do.
Ha! Got you.
If you want to be all pretentious, then fine. But get it right: I'm the Right Honourable.
Not that you have to call me either of those, I'm not one for titles! Don't refer to other like that; so I wouldn't expect them to refer to me in that manner.

But it does mean they teach it more...
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Thank you Mr Speaker.

(Original post by bun)
Ha! Got you.
If you want to be all pretentious, then fine. But get it right: I'm the Right Honourable.
Not that you have to call me either of those, I'm not one for titles! Don't refer to other like that; so I wouldn't expect them to refer to me in that manner.

But it does mean they teach it more...
I apologise to the right honourable gentleman for my mistake in addressing him inaccurately.

The bill specifies what to teach, and when to teach what. I see that as a supplement to the National Curriculum. It did not say it needs to be taught more on top of the current level, but that it has to be included in this form.
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bun
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(Original post by clh_hilary)
Thank you Mr Speaker.



I apologise to the right honourable gentleman for my mistake in addressing him inaccurately.

The bill specifies what to teach, and when to teach what. I see that as a supplement to the National Curriculum. It did not say it needs to be taught more on top of the current level, but that it has to be included in this form.
Not going to get into another debate with you. How does ADDING this to the national curriculum NOT mean that climate change gets taught more?!

As I say, I'm all for it to be included in this way, I just want it removed from the other subjects where it has absolutely no place before I would vote for this.
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Baron of Sealand
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(Original post by bun)
Not going to get into another debate with you. How does ADDING this to the national curriculum NOT mean that climate change gets taught more?!

As I say, I'm all for it to be included in this way, I just want it removed from the other subjects where it has absolutely no place before I would vote for this.
As stated in the notes session, it has been removed as a topic in the National Curriculum, and this bill specifies where to put it back in at a certain level.

In other words, it is to take it away altogether apart from learning about climate systems in geography, then add it back as a topic in the different levels.
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SciFiRory
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aye
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(Original post by barnetlad)
Aye. What are UKIPs' views on this, given the views some of their members have espoused?
(Original post by SciFiRory)
aye
Thank you for the support.
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Chlorophile
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Aye, this is very good.
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PhysicsKid
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Aye, though I'd like to see further environmental/resources issues added: my KS3 Geography was very human geography and issues based; which was much more popular and successful.
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Hmm, I share similar concerns as Bun. I am getting climate change rammed down my throat in too many topics already. However it is a nay on the basis that it is already taught in nearly every subject that I take, also, the same topic being taught for three consecutive years would be boring, and actually decrease how much some people care.
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Well Aye, but there is already a huge emphasis on climate change in curriculum - it gets very dull
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Undecided. Whilst I believe the intentions of the bill are honorable, I think further discussion needs to take place regarding the possibility of this alienating people who already study it to the point of alienation, as others above have described.
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Nay. This is already taught too much in school. There is no need for this.

Have you thought about how many trees will have to be cut down to create new textbooks and new exam papers based on climate change.

You are all too fanatical about this rubbish. It's just a tax on the moronic.


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Cheese_Monster
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(Original post by MacDaddi)
Well Aye, but there is already a huge emphasis on climate change in curriculum - it gets very dull

(Original post by Lipvig)
Undecided. Whilst I believe the intentions of the bill are honorable, I think further discussion needs to take place regarding the possibility of this alienating people who already study it to the point of alienation, as others above have described.

(Original post by nebelbon)
Nay. This is already taught too much in school. There is no need for this.

Have you thought about how many trees will have to be cut down to create new textbooks and new exam papers based on climate change.

You are all too fanatical about this rubbish. It's just a tax on the moronic.


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So, we shouldn't emphasise Climate Change because it's boring? Compelling argument.
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That Bearded Man
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(Original post by nebelbon)
Nay. This is already taught too much in school. There is no need for this.

Have you thought about how many trees will have to be cut down to create new textbooks and new exam papers based on climate change.

You are all too fanatical about this rubbish. It's just a tax on the moronic.


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You're surprised that the Green Party takes climate change very seriously?
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