HexBugMaster
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Hey!

So I'm preparing for the Government and Politics Edexcel exams after self-studying the subject. After glancing over the past papers quickly I have come to the conclusion that each of the 4 questions links to one of the 4 main topics in each unit(so one's about elections, another's about pressure groups and so on).

Now my question to the more experienced students: is it a viable strategy to just revise for the two main topics in a unit that you're most comfortable with, since you only have to answer two questions in the exam? And how dangerous could it be to limit yourself to just two questions or is it actually common practice?

Thanks for the help!
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Everglow
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Hi,

It's a risk and, without sounding mean, depends a fair bit on your intellect. More able students can often get away with it if they learn the syllabus in and out for those two topics. That said, it's still a risk you have to be wary of because exam boards are known for throwing strange, even inaccurate, questions into their exams sometimes.

I would say definitely specialise in two sections, but revise for a third section as well for your backup if you want to be safe.

In my opinion, democracy and elections are the most accessible sections of unit 1.

Good luck.
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moggington
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I pretty much couldn't agree more with the post above. Democracy and elections are definitely the safest way to play it for U1, and they'll repeat the questions for these over and over again. In fact, the final practice essay I did before last year's exam was the one that I actually ended up getting in the exam and I could remember all of the arguments for/against!

To put it into context, people in my class who only revised two units last year were predicted A grades and came out with C grades instead. Obviously this varies from school to school, and the quality of revision put into those two units, but it's better to maximise your opportunity of scoring high.
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HexBugMaster
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(Original post by Reluire)
Hi,

It's a risk and, without sounding mean, depends a fair bit on your intellect. More able students can often get away with it if they learn the syllabus in and out for those two topics. That said, it's still a risk you have to be wary of because exam boards are known for throwing strange, even inaccurate, questions into their exams sometimes.

I would say definitely specialise in two sections, but revise for a third section as well for your backup if you want to be safe.

In my opinion, democracy and elections are the most accessible sections of unit 1.

Good luck.

(Original post by moggington)
I pretty much couldn't agree more with the post above. Democracy and elections are definitely the safest way to play it for U1, and they'll repeat the questions for these over and over again. In fact, the final practice essay I did before last year's exam was the one that I actually ended up getting in the exam and I could remember all of the arguments for/against!

To put it into context, people in my class who only revised two units last year were predicted A grades and came out with C grades instead. Obviously this varies from school to school, and the quality of revision put into those two units, but it's better to maximise your opportunity of scoring high.
Thanks for the help, guys! That really clears the dilemma.

Could you also give me a hint which units are the most accessible in Unit 2?
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moggington
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(Original post by HexBugMaster)
Thanks for the help, guys! That really clears the dilemma.

Could you also give me a hint which units are the most accessible in Unit 2?
Unit 2 is debatable, but I'd definitely say the Constitution as it pretty much forms the foundations of the unit. For this, it'd definitely be a good idea to read up on Scottish independence as there's some suspicions that it could make an appearance.

As for the second most accessible unit, I'd probably go with the Prime Minister and Cabinet unit, because there's not much to it and again, questions often get repeated. It's also one where simply knowing a little bit of current affairs and the roles of the cabinet will really help you. Read up on the coalition for this, there's not a great deal on it in the textbooks (although there may be in newer additions) and it's worth knowing for questions (particularly 40 marks) on the limits to PM power.
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HexBugMaster
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(Original post by moggington)
Unit 2 is debatable, but I'd definitely say the Constitution as it pretty much forms the foundations of the unit. For this, it'd definitely be a good idea to read up on Scottish independence as there's some suspicions that it could make an appearance.

As for the second most accessible unit, I'd probably go with the Prime Minister and Cabinet unit, because there's not much to it and again, questions often get repeated. It's also one where simply knowing a little bit of current affairs and the roles of the cabinet will really help you. Read up on the coalition for this, there's not a great deal on it in the textbooks (although there may be in newer additions) and it's worth knowing for questions (particularly 40 marks) on the limits to PM power.
Thank you!
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christinaring97
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(Original post by HexBugMaster)
Hey!

So I'm preparing for the Government and Politics Edexcel exams after self-studying the subject. After glancing over the past papers quickly I have come to the conclusion that each of the 4 questions links to one of the 4 main topics in each unit(so one's about elections, another's about pressure groups and so on).

Now my question to the more experienced students: is it a viable strategy to just revise for the two main topics in a unit that you're most comfortable with, since you only have to answer two questions in the exam? And how dangerous could it be to limit yourself to just two questions or is it actually common practice?

Thanks for the help!
I would say, revise 3 of the 4 topics. You don't want to limit yourself to just 2 because something might come up on the 10 or 25 mark that you don't remember anything about! I'm currently revising for AS Politics aswell and i'm revising the 3 i feel most comfortable with.

Good luck!x
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HexBugMaster
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(Original post by christinaring97)
I would say, revise 3 of the 4 topics. You don't want to limit yourself to just 2 because something might come up on the 10 or 25 mark that you don't remember anything about! I'm currently revising for AS Politics aswell and i'm revising the 3 i feel most comfortable with.

Good luck!x
Thank you and good luck with your exams too
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