suzylemonade
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I really don't understand what it is/how it works.
I've read AQA's description of it and it's only helped to make me more confused
For example, I just marked a biology paper and got 41/45 and a chemistry paper and got 56/60. Now AQA says that's 100 UMS in both, which I don't really understand. How could I have got 100 UMS if I didn't get 100%? What is UMS?
This must be sounding extremely stupid to those who do know what UMS is, I realise. But I'd be eternally grateful to anyone who could explain it to me, because right now I'm just confused
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Old_Simon
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You need Further Maths to understand it !!!!
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suzylemonade
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(Original post by Old_Simon)
You need Further Maths to understand it !!!!
Darn! I totally should have blackmailed my school into letting me take Ad Maths :rolleyes:
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TSR561
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(Original post by suzylemonade)
I really don't understand what it is/how it works.
I've read AQA's description of it and it's only helped to make me more confused
For example, I just marked a biology paper and got 41/45 and a chemistry paper and got 56/60. Now AQA says that's 100 UMS in both, which I don't really understand. How could I have got 100 UMS if I didn't get 100%? What is UMS?
This must be sounding extremely stupid to those who do know what UMS is, I realise. But I'd be eternally grateful to anyone who could explain it to me, because right now I'm just confused
It's basically a scaling system. 90 UMS is an A*, 80 is an A, 70 is a B etc. They're scaled depending on how easy or hard a paper was during any given year, so if a paper was particularly difficult, the marks are scaled down, like in your case where dropping 4 marks is still considered to be 100 UMS.
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suzylemonade
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(Original post by TSR561)
It's basically a scaling system. 90 UMS is an A*, 80 is an A, 70 is a B etc. They're scaled depending on how easy or hard a paper was during any given year, so if a paper was particularly difficult, the marks are scaled down, like in your case where dropping 4 marks is still considered to be 100 UMS.
Ah, okay. So does UMS actually mean anything?
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IFoundWonderland
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(Original post by suzylemonade)
I really don't understand what it is/how it works.
I've read AQA's description of it and it's only helped to make me more confused
For example, I just marked a biology paper and got 41/45 and a chemistry paper and got 56/60. Now AQA says that's 100 UMS in both, which I don't really understand. How could I have got 100 UMS if I didn't get 100%? What is UMS?
This must be sounding extremely stupid to those who do know what UMS is, I realise. But I'd be eternally grateful to anyone who could explain it to me, because right now I'm just confused
That was the top 1% of marks.

In my year it went as low as 42/60 for 100 UMS in biology...
That means that the top 1% of people got 42 or more.
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suzylemonade
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(Original post by TSR561)
It's basically a scaling system. 90 UMS is an A*, 80 is an A, 70 is a B etc. They're scaled depending on how easy or hard a paper was during any given year, so if a paper was particularly difficult, the marks are scaled down, like in your case where dropping 4 marks is still considered to be 100 UMS.
And also, will my results be in raw marks or in UMS on results' day?
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TSR561
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(Original post by suzylemonade)
Ah, okay. So does UMS actually mean anything?
Of course, it's what is used to grade the paper. 90% of the marks aren't necessarily an A*, 90 UMS is. I think I got both for my GCSEs, but only UMS for my AS results.
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10% get 90 UMS aka A*

Next 10% get 80 UMS aka A

UMS boundaries don't change, while raw marks do depending on relative performance of year group

Do u even maths brah?

Srs

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suzylemonade
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(Original post by majmuh24)
10% get 90 UMS aka A*

Next 10% get 80 UMS aka A

UMS boundaries don't change, while raw marks do depending on relative performance of year group

Do u even maths brah?

Srs

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Ohhhhhhhh, right. Okay, yeah, that makes sense.
I do maths occasionally, but not after I've just chemistry-d
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Feraligatr
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(Original post by suzylemonade)
I really don't understand what it is/how it works.
I've read AQA's description of it and it's only helped to make me more confused
For example, I just marked a biology paper and got 41/45 and a chemistry paper and got 56/60. Now AQA says that's 100 UMS in both, which I don't really understand. How could I have got 100 UMS if I didn't get 100%? What is UMS?
This must be sounding extremely stupid to those who do know what UMS is, I realise. But I'd be eternally grateful to anyone who could explain it to me, because right now I'm just confused
UMS Marks ensure that the grade u get is fair with a person who did an easier exam.
Lets say that June 2012 paper was easier than June 2013 paper. You did both and got 45/60 in June 2012 but 41/60 in June 2013. Because it was simpler in June 2012, you got the same UMS marks in June 2013.

The same rule applies when you do different papers in the same series.
Bio may be harder than Chem

100 UMS don't mean 100% though. If you got 100/100 UMS Marks, you hit a cap (a mark which means you don't get any more UMS marks because it is the highest UMS Mark you can get)
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Mike_123
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(Original post by majmuh24)
10% get 90 UMS aka A*

Next 10% get 80 UMS aka A

UMS boundaries don't change, while raw marks do depending on relative performance of year group

Do u even maths brah?

Srs
Except it isn't graded on a bell-curve.

Do u even logic brah?
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(Original post by Mike_123)
Except it isn't graded on a bell-curve.

Do u even logic brah?
I always thought it was, aren't the raw marks adjusted so a certain percentage of people get a certain grade?

I'm confused brah :confused:

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suzylemonade
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(Original post by TSR561)
Of course, it's what is used to grade the paper. 90% of the marks aren't necessarily an A*, 90 UMS is. I think I got both for my GCSEs, but only UMS for my AS results.
Right, I see. Thanks, I think I now understand UMS xD
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Mike_123
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(Original post by majmuh24)
I always thought it was, aren't the raw marks adjusted so a certain percentage of people get a certain grade?

I'm confused brah :confused:

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As far as I know it isn't, because I know that 20%+ get A* Maths at A level, brah.
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(Original post by Mike_123)
As far as I know it isn't, because I know that 20%+ get A* Maths at A level, brah.
How do you know that?

I've looked around, and the UK GCSE grading system at least seems to be very secretive but one of my teachers said it was something like that, lol

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Mike_123
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(Original post by majmuh24)
How do you know that?

I've looked around, and the UK GCSE grading system at least seems to be very secretive but one of my teachers said it was something like that, lol

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Can't remember but exam boards have a document on % grades. Also, last year over 25% received grades A/A* in A2.
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(Original post by Mike_123)
Can't remember but exam boards have a document on % grades. Also, last year over 25% received grades A/A* in A2.
Either way, I'm pretty sure it's adjusted so only a certain proportion get a certain grade, cos grades are given relative to the people in your year right? A lot of people might get exactly the same marks so that changes it a bit, but it's around a similar point IIRC

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Dalek1099
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(Original post by majmuh24)
How do you know that?

I've looked around, and the UK GCSE grading system at least seems to be very secretive but one of my teachers said it was something like that, lol

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Its not secretive its just very complicated.What examiners do is mark all the papers and plot the marks on a graph and examiners look through the papers and look at the quality of answer responded to get so many marks in each question and then in the whole paper and ensure that the same quality of answer is required to get the same grade each year.I have heard they look for marks that loads of students got around to separate students into Grade A,Grade B and Grade C and to finalise specific marks they do a vote and usually they try to make it so the gaps between the boundaries are equal.Its probably more complicated but in theory 0% could get an A* or 100% get an A*.This system is responsible for all the grade inflation, in the old O-Level system grade inflation was impossible.Its definetley not a set system where x% gets each grade or even close.There was controversy when a much larger percent got the top marks in the June 12 exams compared to the Jan 12 exams for Unit 1 GCSE Science:http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-19599279
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(Original post by Dalek1099)
Its not secretive its just very complicated.What examiners do is mark all the papers and plot the marks on a graph and examiners look through the papers and look at the quality of answer responded to get so many marks in each question and then in the whole paper and ensure that the same quality of answer is required to get the same grade each year.I have heard they look for marks that loads of students got around to separate students into Grade A,Grade B and Grade C and to finalise specific marks they do a vote and usually they try to make it so the gaps between the boundaries are equal.Its probably more complicated but in theory 0% could get an A* or 100% get an A*.This system is responsible for all the grade inflation, in the old O-Level system grade inflation was impossible.Its definetley not a set system where x% gets each grade or even close.There was controversy when a much larger percent got the top marks in the June 12 exams compared to the Jan 12 exams for Unit 1 GCSE Science:http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-19599279
Where did you get this from m8?

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