Emma9090
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Hi,

I am struggling to decide between studying Biological Sciences at Exeter or Biomedical Sciences at Bath. I do not know whether it is seen as better to have one degree over the other or if one leads to better job prospects. In some ways I feel the broader biology degree would leave more options open, but at the same time I am really interested in physiology and there is hardly any in the biology degree. Does anybody have any advice? The Biomed degree is not accredited, but I don't think I would want to work in an nhs lab anyway. What are the pros and cons of each course?

Any advice would be great
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Lethorio
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Biological Sciences will typically have you learn more about the environment and animals/plants, although the option to take modules in human biology will more than likely be available.

Biomedical Science is far more medically oriented, as the name suggests. If you have any interest in working in medical research following your undergraduate degree, this would be the better choice.
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themadmedic
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Biomed is more of a training to be an NHS biomedical scientist, biological sciences is more broadly biology and not aimed towards medical sciences, hope that helps!
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Lethorio
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(Original post by themadmedic)
Biomed is more of a training to be an NHS biomedical scientist, biological sciences is more broadly biology and not aimed towards medical sciences, hope that helps!
The biomedical science course at Bath isn't accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science. This means you would need to complete top up modules (at your own expense) before you would be allowed to become a biomedical scientist in the NHS.

The purpose of unaccredited courses is to promote more flexibility with module options, which will enable you to undertake more specialised study at Master's level. It effectively encourages you to go down the research route, rather than to train as an NHS biomedical scientist.
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rakusmaximus
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I'm studying biological sciences at exeter, and I can highly recommend it. It's obviously much broader than biomedical sciences, but there are modules you can choose in 2nd and 3rd year that are a bit more focused on biomedicine.
Take a look and see if they interest you.
http://biosciences.exeter.ac.uk/curr.../modulechoice/
You're right, there isn't much physiology, but in some cases it's possible to choose a couple of modules from other disciplines, I'm sure you could wrangle it so that you take some medicine courses that would include physiology.

I'm have a similar interest to you, but I enjoy the broad course because it has opened my eyes to so many other options, and I can always specialise later on.

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Emma9090
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Thank you so much for the replies. They have been a great help. I absolutely fell in love with Exeter when I was there and do not want to become an nhs biomedical scientist so a more general biological sciences degree where I can specialise later is the better option I think
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