How could I get my level higher for English?

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BULL14
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Hello,
I am really unsure how could I possibly get my level higher for English, currently I am working on a level 6b in year 9 though I want to get an A grade for my GCSE's. can anyone give me any good tips please? - it will be appreciates
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BULL14
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Is anyone there i need help - it is urgent
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everything1177
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When I was in year 9, I started reading a lot and I started writing stuff like short stories just to get used to writing more. I definately improved and it helped me move into a higher set. My target grade is an A, and hopefully I can get that in my exam next month (especially since I picked it for A-level :eek: ).

I think reading as much as you can would be a good place to start. Maybe find out what books you will be studying for GCSE, and read them or at least find out what they're about, just to get a head start.

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BULL14
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thanks. But what level were you in year 9? I am a 6b, do you think I have any chance of getting a A grade at GCSE? I am in top set too and my teacher is a very harsh marker when it comes to English, for example I got an A* for ICT essay and levels 7's for History and Geography. So do you think my English techer is a harsh marker
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tryrevise
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I really wouldn't worry too much about your national curriculum levels, once you get to GCSE you'll probably find that they were pretty irrelevant. GCSE work is likely to be different to what you're doing in KS3 anyway and it's a big step up, just put in the effort to get the best grade possible. English has always been one of my strongest subjects and I was getting 7bs in year 7 yet somehow got a 6 as my end of KS3 level. I'm now in Year 10 and getting consistent A*s. To be getting As you need to work hard in class and be able to write confident analysis of texts - you'll find the expectation for your work will rise as well as the criteria needed I achieve a high grade. You don't need to get hung up on your national curriculum level as you'll find that in Year 10 people will no longer remember or care about the NC levels they were getting in KS3.


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BULL14
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(Original post by tryrevise)
I really wouldn't worry too much about your national curriculum levels, once you get to GCSE you'll probably find that they were pretty irrelevant. GCSE work is likely to be different to what you're doing in KS3 anyway and it's a big step up, just put in the effort to get the best grade possible. English has always been one of my strongest subjects and I was getting 7bs in year 7 yet somehow got a 6 as my end of KS3 level. I'm now in Year 10 and getting consistent A*s. To be getting As you need to work hard in class and be able to write confident analysis of texts - you'll find the expectation for your work will rise as well as the criteria needed I achieve a high grade. You don't need to get hung up on your national curriculum level as you'll find that in Year 10 people will no longer remember or care about the NC levels they were getting in KS3.




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But aren't predicted grades formed from your nation curriculum levels in year 9. So year 9 is pointless, I mean I have started my unseen poetry module in year 9 and my science modules
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Black Rose
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(Original post by tryrevise)
I really wouldn't worry too much about your national curriculum levels, once you get to GCSE you'll probably find that they were pretty irrelevant. GCSE work is likely to be different to what you're doing in KS3 anyway and it's a big step up, just put in the effort to get the best grade possible. English has always been one of my strongest subjects and I was getting 7bs in year 7 yet somehow got a 6 as my end of KS3 level. I'm now in Year 10 and getting consistent A*s. To be getting As you need to work hard in class and be able to write confident analysis of texts - you'll find the expectation for your work will rise as well as the criteria needed I achieve a high grade. You don't need to get hung up on your national curriculum level as you'll find that in Year 10 people will no longer remember or care about the NC levels they were getting in KS3.

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This. I'm currently in Year 10 ans honestly, KS3 doesn't matter much, just gets your prepared for the GCSE stuff (familiarity with the texts, literary techniques etc)

I wouldn't worry much, you can't really say what grade you'll get until you do the GCSE stuff. But I recommend concentrating in class, especially when you learn about the poems, novels, plays. You're likely to do them in your GCSE but they will go over it again when you come to do that. Also, reading, I think reading is important, I'm good at my essays and I think if I didn't read, I wouldn't have done that well. I like to do something creative in my essays and some of the ideas I get come from things I've read/seen/researched

(Original post by BULL14)
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tryrevise
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(Original post by BULL14)
But aren't predicted grades formed from your nation curriculum levels in year 9. So year 9 is pointless, I mean I have started my unseen poetry module in year 9 and my science modules
No no, it's definitely not pointless. Your predicted grades rest on a number or things, your year 9 level being one of them. Your FFT grade (government prediction) rests on a number of factors including your Year 6 SAT level, your KS3 progress,where you live, average grades of other candidates with a similar academic profile and what your parents do for a job. The grade your teacher predicts for you (and which will be much more accurate and relevant to your ability) will most likely be predicted halfway through Year 10 and although they may look at what you got in KS3 it's mostly to do with how you've been doing at GCSE so far and how much improvement they think you'll make in the next year to have an accurate prediction of what you're likely to achieve at the end of year 11. I started some of the material in Year 9 as well, but it's Year 10 that the work actually starts to really count towards something a bit more. In Year 9 I wouldn't really worry too much, but obviously do your best so you're well prepared for starting your GCSEs.


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everything1177
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(Original post by BULL14)
thanks. But what level were you in year 9? I am a 6b, do you think I have any chance of getting a A grade at GCSE? I am in top set too and my teacher is a very harsh marker when it comes to English, for example I got an A* for ICT essay and levels 7's for History and Geography. So do you think my English techer is a harsh marker
I don't actually remember stuff about levels from year 9. But for Geography and History I was also mostly level 7. I think as long as you try hard enough and do work outside of school, you will be able to get an A.
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