Suemarie
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#1
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Hello, right so I need some help.


No label for access course, so hoping 6th form is acceptable :confused:
I've missed two lessons due to University interviews and my study buddies aren't very forthcoming with paperwork or notes...or anything for that matter .
Anyhow, I was hoping that someone could help me get started with these two questions:
Q1 Explain genetic control of protein (S-F)
Q2 explain Mendelian genetics (related to disease inheritance such as cystic fibrosis)


Any help much appreciated...
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Lethorio
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I'm not entirely sure what the genetic control of protein is referring to. Are they wanting you to discuss transcription/translation?

For Question 2, I would advise that you watch this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dHBTckFvME
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Suemarie
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Thank you Lethorio,

basically: Q1 describe roles of DNA, mRNA, tRNA and evaluate effects of point mutations.
I have started on it, with explaining what the above are and what they do, just the roles...

Urgh and to think I've got another 3 years of this...
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Lethorio
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I'd suggest you read up on transcription and translation to learn about the roles of DNA, mRNA and tRNA.

Point mutations are when a single base is swapped with another. An example of this could be a CCG codon mutating to become a GCG codon, etc. The main effects of them tend to be that the encoded amino acid would often change. This can sometimes be beneficial, however, it is usually a bad thing. If there is a point mutation in a stop codon, this may result in further amino acids being translated, which can lead to things like cancer.
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Hype en Ecosse
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(Original post by Lethorio)
I'd suggest you read up on transcription and translation to learn about the roles of DNA, mRNA and tRNA.

Point mutations are when a single base is swapped with another. An example of this could be a CCG codon mutating to become a GCG codon, etc. The main effects of them tend to be that the encoded amino acid would often change. This can sometimes be beneficial, however, it is usually a bad thing. If there is a point mutation in a stop codon, this may result in further amino acids being translated, which can lead to things like cancer.
Lethoria has answered question 1 quite well for you here, but I'd be careful about the "...which can lead to cancer" bit. Mutation is the fundamental unit of most genetic disease (the exception being numerical abnormalities), and a point mutation's effects depend upon what point mutation in what codon in what gene. It can lead to "cancer", but this is one small example in a vast field of disease, and but one potential cause.

For Q2: are you familiar with what Mendelian inheritance is yet? Or is it something else that's troubling you with the question?

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Suemarie
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Well I missed 2 lessons and typically they were discussing point mutations, I understand that part, deletion, substitution, frame shift and I know now further research will lead to better grades,

I'm hoping that they haven't discussed Mendelian genetics yet...
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