evefleming3
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I'm sitting my National 5 English exam tomorrow and I'm so scared its unbelievable because I have an awful teacher and I think I'm going to fail because of her. I'm fine for the Scottish Texts and Close Reading but for the Critical Essay me and a lot of others in my class are completely clueless. Our essay is on drama and it is An Inspector Calls. if something would help me it would be hugely appreciated.
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LorcanD_J
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I have never heard of it but BBC Bitesize seems to have material on it http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebit...nspectorcalls/
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evefleming3
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(Original post by LorcanD_J)
I have never heard of it but BBC Bitesize seems to have material on it http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebit...nspectorcalls/
I've used that already but it's when it comes to the actual essay, I have no idea what types of things to get my quotes for, I was under the impression to have them for theme and character and the teacher said today that that's in the things you have to include in the analysis not on the essay question
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LorcanD_J
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(Original post by evefleming3)
I've used that already but it's when it comes to the actual essay, I have no idea what types of things to get my quotes for, I was under the impression to have them for theme and character and the teacher said today that that's in the things you have to include in the analysis not on the essay question
But you have to have analysis in the essay as well.
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MadApple
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Has your teacher taught you how to structure your essay?
Like: State
Quote
Analysis
You start off writing a statment, mentioning the key words from the question, then support it with a quote and anaylse the quote.
I'm doing MacBeth and what my teacher said was 'memorise as many important quotes as possible then in the exam pick out the relevant ones.'
Hope that helps
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evefleming3
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(Original post by LorcanD_J)
But you have to have analysis in the essay as well.
I know that's what I thought, which doesn't make sense what she's saying I'm so confused on what quotes to pick


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evefleming3
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(Original post by MadApple)
Has your teacher taught you how to structure your essay?
Like: State
Quote
Analysis
You start off writing a statment, mentioning the key words from the question, then support it with a quote and anaylse the quote.
I'm doing MacBeth and what my teacher said was 'memorise as many important quotes as possible then in the exam pick out the relevant ones.'
Hope that helps
She didn't teach us how to structure it but I got it off of youtube videos and things off the internet during the Easter holidays, I just don't know what quotes to get because she changed her mind on what to expect. It does thank you
What sort of essay questions are you predicting for tomorrow?


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MadApple
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(Original post by evefleming3)
She didn't teach us how to structure it but I got it off of youtube videos and things off the internet during the Easter holidays, I just don't know what quotes to get because she changed her mind on what to expect. It does thank you
What sort of essay questions are you predicting for tomorrow?


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No one really know what to expect I guess, it's all luck
Try looking at Int2 pass paper questions, they give you some ideas of what to expect.

TBH, I have no idea.
The question in the prelim was about conflict between characters and that wasn't really what I expected...
But I'm hoping for questions like 'a play with a tragic ending' or 'a character with a fatal flaw'

I just found this webite that might help:
http://www.gradesaver.com/an-inspect...-guide/quotes/
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Ecasx
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I'm doing Macbeth too and it's really my strong point this year.

It's true that Nat 5 questions are purely Int 2 questions recycled.

Personally I predict either of the following to come up:

"Choose a play in which a character suffers from a human weakness (ambition)... Show how this human weakness affects the characters and/or events in the play."

OR

"Choose a play in which a main character's actions have a significant impact on the play as a whole. Show how these actions impact the characters and events in the play."

These are both taken from Int 2 (with slight paraphrasing from memory).


REASONS

1. Both questions in the specimen are highly suitable for Macbeth (sympathy for a flawed character; turning point). Under the assumption that these questions will not be repeated, we rule out these 'topics'.

2. The SQA have stated that the questions are designed to be 'broadly accessible'. This is the first exam and so there will be 'broad' questions suiting a multitude of texts.

3. Due to Macbeth's popularity and the above reason, there will be a question suited to Macbeth. This is, however, unlikely to be either of the specimen paper questions.

And so we are left with the main theme of the play: ambition.

The question could be on a human weakness (which could entail a variety of things other than ambition) as it is very 'broad'. Or, to make it even more broader (and a tad simpler), the question could simply be on the effects of a character's actions, which, for Macbeth, is identical to the previous question minus ambition. In particular, questions relating to ambition are very popular in Int 2 past papers.

Of course, there could also be a question on the ending or the opening scenes, which are also very broad. I wouldn't bet on it, though; not only are they easy to improvise for, they are rather rare in Int 2 (plus my ever-trustful gut feeling).

However, make sure to study for everything. Just keep your eye it for these questions... hopefully..
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evefleming3
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(Original post by Ecasx)
I'm doing Macbeth too and it's really my strong point this year.

It's true that Nat 5 questions are purely Int 2 questions recycled.

Personally I predict either of the following to come up:

"Choose a play in which a character suffers from a human weakness (ambition)... Show how this human weakness affects the characters and/or events in the play."

OR

"Choose a play in which a main character's actions have a significant impact on the play as a whole. Show how these actions impact the characters and events in the play."

These are both taken from Int 2 (with slight paraphrasing from memory).


REASONS

1. Both questions in the specimen are highly suitable for Macbeth (sympathy for a flawed character; turning point). Under the assumption that these questions will not be repeated, we rule out these 'topics'.

2. The SQA have stated that the questions are designed to be 'broadly accessible'. This is the first exam and so there will be 'broad' questions suiting a multitude of texts.

3. Due to Macbeth's popularity and the above reason, there will be a question suited to Macbeth. This is, however, unlikely to be either of the specimen paper questions.

And so we are left with the main theme of the play: ambition.

The question could be on a human weakness (which could entail a variety of things other than ambition) as it is very 'broad'. Or, to make it even more broader (and a tad simpler), the question could simply be on the effects of a character's actions, which, for Macbeth, is identical to the previous question minus ambition. In particular, questions relating to ambition are very popular in Int 2 past papers.

Of course, there could also be a question on the ending or the opening scenes, which are also very broad. I wouldn't bet on it, though; not only are they easy to improvise for, they are rather rare in Int 2 (plus my ever-trustful gut feeling).

However, make sure to study for everything. Just keep your eye it for these questions... hopefully..
That's really helpful, I'm not doing Macbeth and the play I'm doing there isn't a main character it's a family and they're all involved in the reasoning for a suicide but no one character is fully to blame the main theme throughout is responsibility

I'm not sure about many of the things you said though so I have a lot of studying still to do

The play also doesn't have a turning point which is unusual but if I'm honest I think my teacher is talking rubbish

Personally, I'm hoping for ending and opening scenes as these are the key scenes throughout the play

Thank you



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Ecasx
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(Original post by evefleming3)
That's really helpful, I'm not doing Macbeth and the play I'm doing there isn't a main character it's a family and they're all involved in the reasoning for a suicide but no one character is fully to blame the main theme throughout is responsibility

I'm not sure about many of the things you said though so I have a lot of studying still to do

The play also doesn't have a turning point which is unusual but if I'm honest I think my teacher is talking rubbish

Personally, I'm hoping for ending and opening scenes as these are the key scenes throughout the play

Thank you



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For Macbeth, an ending question is entirely suitable.

The suitability of an opening scene question depends on its wording, though. If it says opening SCENES, then its perfect. If it says opening SCENE, there is not much to write about the very first scene in Macbeth (nothing to analyse).

Good luck.
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evefleming3
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(Original post by Ecasx)
For Macbeth, an ending question is entirely suitable.

The suitability of an opening scene question depends on its wording, though. If it says opening SCENES, then its perfect. If it says opening SCENE, there is not much to write about the very first scene in Macbeth (nothing to analyse).

Good luck.
You sound like you really know your text well for this, I wish I did as much as you.
Thanks for the help and good luck.


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Ecasx
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(Original post by evefleming3)
You sound like you really know your text well for this, I wish I did as much as you.
Thanks for the help and good luck.


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Thanks. I've been studying it for the past 4 days. Pays off.
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Ecasx
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The exam was great! Close reading was extremely interesting and quite basic, as was the textual analysis, and although the SQA were rather deviant with the critical essay question I chose, I managed to analyse 9 quotations and provided a nice conclusion. Not sure if they deliberately made it easier, but I loved it.
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chopinfan
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I thought the Close Reading was horrible but then again I'd kinda zoned out before the exam. Had to read the text 3 times to make it sink in and I thought the marks were allocated really weirdy to each question. What did everyone put for the question about the writer's father's attitude?? Didn't seem worth 4 marks to me... On the other hand, Critical Reading went really well - happy with that.
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username1405872
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(Original post by Ecasx)
The exam was great! Close reading was extremely interesting and quite basic, as was the textual analysis, and although the SQA were rather deviant with the critical essay question I chose, I managed to analyse 9 quotations and provided a nice conclusion. Not sure if they deliberately made it easier, but I loved it.
Hahaha! Can't say I totally agree with you! I found the close reading quite difficult- certainly more difficult than the specimen and model papers- and I would definitely not go to the extent of calling it basic! Then the critical reading was ok but I found the questions in the poetry section too general which actually made it hard to pick out the correct points. The essay (prose) was ok but I did struggle to make it relevant to my novel.

Generally I found it harder than I expected ( and I am predicted an A band 1...one of the few in my class). I was actually surprised how hard it was considering this is the first year. People around me actually started giving up! Hoping for the best though!
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Ecasx
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'Great, go ahead!' he cried
- initial attitude is one of approval
- use of exclamation mark and 'cried' suggest excitement

'divinely astuting that I wouldn't go ahead with it, had he agreed with me'
- father's trickery to con the writer into changing his decision is displayed
- real attitude is disapproving
- previous attitude is shown to be fake / not genuine
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username1405872
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Hey does anybody know what the percentage for an A in english is? I heard it's around 70-75%?
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Ecasx
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(Original post by tinababy)
Hahaha! Can't say I totally agree with you! I found the close reading quite difficult- certainly more difficult than the specimen and model papers- and I would definitely not go to the extent of calling it basic! Then the critical reading was ok but I found the questions in the poetry section too general which actually made it hard to pick out the correct points. The essay (prose) was ok but I did struggle to make it relevant to my novel.

Generally I found it harder than I expected ( and I am predicted an A band 1...one of the few in my class). I was actually surprised how hard it was considering this is the first year. People around me actually started giving up! Hoping for the best though!
You think?! Most of my friends found the close reading easy, and although I dont trust them as they arent exactly the brightest bunch (they call everything 'easy' and fail), I can actually confirm it myself. I found this so much easier than the specimen paper!

I took a big risk in not studying my second text, but I was sure all along that a question would come up for Macbeth - and there was two. The question I chose was worded in a strange way though. Overall, pleased with this exam.
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(Original post by Ecasx)
You think?! Most of my friends found the close reading easy, and although I dont trust them as they arent exactly the brightest bunch (they call everything 'easy' and fail), I can actually confirm it myself. I found this so much easier than the specimen paper!

I took a big risk in not studying my second text, but I was sure all along that a question would come up for Macbeth - and there was two. The question I chose was worded in a strange way though. Overall, pleased with this exam.
Yeah I know what you mean most of my friends are like that too. Although to be fair, I am usually the really critical and pessimistic one. I guess it's better to under score yourself and be pleased with the outcome rather than be shocked by a low score.
Overall, I think it went ok but not that amazingly.
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