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Cate
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I am vaguely considering going to univeristy in America, but I have no idea what is involved for a British student to go there, in terms of exams, expense etc. I would greatly appriciate it if someone could enlighten me
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DrSoySauce
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I'm pretty sure there have been threads like this before, but since I have now been succesfully admitted to three top unis in America (Yes!) I can help you out:

Many universities in America are looking for international students, which would probably give you an advantage in getting in. But they are very expensive (from about $20000 for everything to $40000), and since you are not a US citizen you probably can't get financial aid to help pay for your tuition. So hope your parents are willing to cough up. American universities are also looking for more 'complete' students than UK unis, which means that it is bettter if you have done alot of things outside of school that are worthwhile, like sports, debate, whatever. Activites. The essay you have to write is quite different too, since it is not just about what course you want to study and why. For that matter, in America you don't choose a course when you apply, you just apply to the entire school and choose what you want to study when you get there.

The main extra exams you need to take is the SAT, and if you want to go to a more selective school, the SAT II. The first one is just a general thing, asking simple math questions and a lot of stupid questions about grammar and vocabulary. The second one is more about certain specific subjects. There are lots of different ones: I did Math IC, Writing, and French. If you want to find out more, you should get a revision guide, which you can probably find at any bookstore, or which you can find online.

I hope this has answered your question, but if you want more info, than send me a message.
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MyNameIsNeo
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There aren't many places in the US that provide financial aid for international students but Harvard and Princeton are two such places.
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Cate
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(Original post by DrSoySauce)
I'm pretty sure there have been threads like this before, but since I have now been succesfully admitted to three top unis in America (Yes!) I can help you out:

Many universities in America are looking for international students, which would probably give you an advantage in getting in. But they are very expensive (from about $20000 for everything to $40000), and since you are not a US citizen you probably can't get financial aid to help pay for your tuition. So hope your parents are willing to cough up. American universities are also looking for more 'complete' students than UK unis, which means that it is bettter if you have done alot of things outside of school that are worthwhile, like sports, debate, whatever. Activites. The essay you have to write is quite different too, since it is not just about what course you want to study and why. For that matter, in America you don't choose a course when you apply, you just apply to the entire school and choose what you want to study when you get there.

The main extra exams you need to take is the SAT, and if you want to go to a more selective school, the SAT II. The first one is just a general thing, asking simple math questions and a lot of stupid questions about grammar and vocabulary. The second one is more about certain specific subjects. There are lots of different ones: I did Math IC, Writing, and French. If you want to find out more, you should get a revision guide, which you can probably find at any bookstore, or which you can find online.

I hope this has answered your question, but if you want more info, than send me a message.
Wow thanks for all that I have given you some rep
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Chicken
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Unless your parents are willing to pay a LOT for you to be educated in America, then I really wouldn't recommend going. A better idea is to look for a course at a uni here which gives you the chance to do a year abroad, particularly in North America. Thats what i'm doing (except that I'm going to Canada for my year abroad). In the prospectus for each uni it'll say whether you can do a year out and which American schools they have links with. Its becomming morepopular, and loads of British uni's now have exchange schemes going with uni's from across the world (I could even go to Japan!). Hope that helps!
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~Sam~
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(Original post by Chicken)
Unless your parents are willing to pay a LOT for you to be educated in America, then I really wouldn't recommend going. A better idea is to look for a course at a uni here which gives you the chance to do a year abroad, particularly in North America. Thats what i'm doing (except that I'm going to Canada for my year abroad). In the prospectus for each uni it'll say whether you can do a year out and which American schools they have links with. Its becomming morepopular, and loads of British uni's now have exchange schemes going with uni's from across the world (I could even go to Japan!). Hope that helps!
What subject are you studying? I really want to go to USA for a year or something but I want to do English and the only uni that does a year in USA is exeter and they want AAA!
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Chicken
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(Original post by ~Sam~)
What subject are you studying? I really want to go to USA for a year or something but I want to do English and the only uni that does a year in USA is exeter and they want AAA!
I'm doing chemistry. Thats quite a steep offer you've got! Does it involve American Studies? Cos I'm sure at UEA you can have a year abroad if you're doing something like English with American Studies.
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Tristessa
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VERY ery ery ery expensive. wanted to go too but no money no honey
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~Sam~
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(Original post by Chicken)
I'm doing chemistry. Thats quite a steep offer you've got! Does it involve American Studies? Cos I'm sure at UEA you can have a year abroad if you're doing something like English with American Studies.
I haven't applied yet (I'm in year 12) but in the prospectus it says AAA is the standard offer. The course doesn't involve American studies, but you get to go to an American University for the second year if you want. I was looking at the UEA prospectus, the English with American studies looks good. Do you like it there?
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MyNameIsNeo
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I just got this from the English website at Exeter:

"Applicants should be aware that, while students on the programme are exempt from US tuition fees, there will be additional costs involved in this degree programme (chiefly arising from the high cost of living in the US), and that you will need to demonstrate your ability to meet those costs at the time of your application to the North American universities. The extra cost of the year in the US is obviously subject to change, but is currently in the region of $10,000-13,000; you may be able to get some LEA and Student Loan help towards this. Please also note that this is a distinct degree programme and that transfer between this degree and others offered by the School of English is not usually possible."

http://www.ex.ac.uk/english/undergra...tudy-faq.shtml

This is around £5,500-7100 for living costs which is awkward because this exceeds the student loan. If (as with most US universities) you need to prove your ability to support yourself then you are basically going to need your parents to back you up!
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~Sam~
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(Original post by MyNameIsNeo)
I just got this from the English website at Exeter:

"Applicants should be aware that, while students on the programme are exempt from US tuition fees, there will be additional costs involved in this degree programme (chiefly arising from the high cost of living in the US), and that you will need to demonstrate your ability to meet those costs at the time of your application to the North American universities. The extra cost of the year in the US is obviously subject to change, but is currently in the region of $10,000-13,000; you may be able to get some LEA and Student Loan help towards this. Please also note that this is a distinct degree programme and that transfer between this degree and others offered by the School of English is not usually possible."

http://www.ex.ac.uk/english/undergra...tudy-faq.shtml

This is around £5,500-7100 for living costs which is awkward because this exceeds the student loan. If (as with most US universities) you need to prove your ability to support yourself then you are basically going to need your parents to back you up!
OMG that's a lot! In the prospectus it says nothing about extra costs!
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MyNameIsNeo
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It would be more if the dollar hadn't fallen in value!

I wouldn't say it is a lot since it actually compares favourably with the NUS average for current student spending in the UK.
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Howard
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(Original post by Cate)
I am vaguely considering going to univeristy in America, but I have no idea what is involved for a British student to go there, in terms of exams, expense etc. I would greatly appriciate it if someone could enlighten me
I really wouldn't bother.

It typically takes 4 years rather than 3 to graduate. It's ridiculously expensive and frankly provides a 2nd rate education at colleges that have a very sterile feel about them.

I have frequently had cause to be on the University of Central Florida's campus and always leave wondering "what do these people do for fun? no bars?"
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MyNameIsNeo
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As I recall the legal drinking age in Florida is 21 which may explain the lack of bars on campus!
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Howard
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(Original post by MyNameIsNeo)
As I recall the legal drinking age in Florida is 21 which may explain the lack of bars on campus!
The legal drinking age everywhere is 21.
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DrSoySauce
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(Original post by Howard)
It typically takes 4 years rather than 3 to graduate. It's ridiculously expensive and frankly provides a 2nd rate education at colleges that have a very sterile feel about them.

I have frequently had cause to be on the University of Central Florida's campus and always leave wondering "what do these people do for fun? no bars?"
Well, no offense, but the University of Central Florida is not all that great. The universtities that are more likely to be well known are alot better. You can compare Harvard to Oxford, but not all unis are at that level.

For alcohol in the US at unis, it's much more likely to be a parties since most students can't get served in bars.
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Howard
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[QUOTE=DrSoySauce]Well, no offense, but the University of Central Florida is not all that great. The universtities that are more likely to be well known are alot better. You can compare Harvard to Oxford, but not all unis are at that level. QUOTE]

That goes without saying really.
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trev
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Universities in America is expensive (obviously), if you have the money go for it, it's worth it! I think American universities are better than UK ones now (but both still have good reputation though). What are you planning to study there?
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MyNameIsNeo
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(Original post by trev1122)
Universities in America is expensive (obviously), if you have the money go for it, it's worth it! I think American universities are better than UK ones now (but both still have good reputation though). What are you planning to study there?
Are you seriously saying that the education experience at Armstrong State University, Arkansa Tech University or Ashland University is somehow superior to what you might obtain from ex-Poly in the UK?
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11cheech11
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A huge chunk of the students at Canadian Universities are American, 'cause even though they pay international fees up here, its still cheaper than studying in the US. And, the drinking age is 18/19, depending on which province you're in.
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