¿Class of degrees? (1st, 2.1, 2.2, etc) Watch

GMT
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Hello,
I've got a few questions, regarding degree classes (grades).

1. How do these grades go and how does the university give you a grade? Are there specific marks/percentages that you need for each grade/class/honour?

2. Why can different universities give a different amount of first degrees?

3. Is there any advantage in going to a uni that gives out more first degrees?

4. When I compared courses on http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/Compare-Courses it stated the percentag of each grade/honour/class that each university gives, are these percentages fairly accurate/realistic?

Thanks a lot. If possible, I'd like an answer quickly, as I have to confirm my final UCAS choices today.
Thank you before hand.

GMT
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GMT
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I'd appreciate an answer...
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GMT
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Bump
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Mutleybm1996
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*watches thread*


Posted from TSR Mobile
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dragonkeeper999
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(Original post by GMT)
Hello,
I've got a few questions, regarding degree classes (grades).

1. How do these grades go and how does the university give you a grade? Are there specific marks/percentages that you need for each grade/class/honour?

2. Why can different universities give a different amount of first degrees?

3. Is there any advantage in going to a uni that gives out more first degrees?

4. When I compared courses on http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/Compare-Courses it stated the percentag of each grade/honour/class that each university gives, are these percentages fairly accurate/realistic?

Thanks a lot. If possible, I'd like an answer quickly, as I have to confirm my final UCAS choices today.
Thank you before hand.

GMT
1. 1st is the highest grade. 3rd is the lowest (except fail). Usually you need: 70% (1st); 60% (2:2); 50% (2:1); 40% (3rd), however universities differ in how exactly they do this - some require these percentages in exams, and adjust them slightly depending on how hard the exams were thought to be, some just use them as a very rough guide but have in mind a proportion of the students they want to award each result - e.g. my uni does ~30% 1sts, ~3% fail, ~7% 3rd and the rest 2nd in my first year (they don't split between 2:2 and 2:1 for some reason). However, this varies significantly between courses, universities and years.

2. Universities can basically do what they like with degree classes. If a degree is accredited then there may be some external input from somewhere, but basically the uni decides.

3. Probably you are more likely to get a 1st/ 2:1 if you go to a uni which seems more generous with the marking - although it might just be that they have better students, which might make the competition for the top marks greater - i.e. you would be less likely to get the top results if you weren't one of the top students from the start (e.g. good A levels). From this point of view, it is better to go to a lower ranked uni where you would be better than the other students and so get a better result. However, employees will sometimes look at the uni you went to - particularly if comparing two similar candidates one of whom went to Oxford and the other to London Met...

4. Yes, they should be the correct results. However, make sure you check your specific course at each uni, which may vary significantly from the uni's overall average.
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WeeGuy
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(Original post by dragonkeeper999)
1. 1st is the highest grade. 3rd is the lowest (except fail). Usually you need: 70% (1st); 60% (2:2); 50% (2:1); 40% (3rd),

think theyre the wrong round.

60% 2:1 50% 2:2
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Carnationlilyrose
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Third isn't the lowest before fail. There is an ordinary degree (one without honours) between third and fail.
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GMT
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Thanks, fantastic. A pretty full answer
I'll rate you positvely
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dragonkeeper999
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(Original post by WeeGuy)
think theyre the wrong round.

60% 2:1 50% 2:2
woops

I wish...
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PQ
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(Original post by carnationlilyrose)
Third isn't the lowest before fail. There is an ordinary degree (one without honours) between third and fail.
Ordinary degrees are a bit of a funny in that they're generally awarded to people who have an overall average percentage that would get them a 3rd but have failed their dissertation (ie they've done quite well in some modules but completely bombed in a couple of others - *usually* including the diss module).

That's why they're equivalent in scotland is awarded after 3 years - because someone leaving a scottish degree after 3 years would have completed some modules at final year "level" but wouldn't have done enough modules/credits accumulated to merit a full degree award.

Also *technically* an ordinary degree is unclassified and is therefore not an "honours" degree - they're kind of like an early exit award that falls between an HND equivalent and an honours degree (like in old A levels if you got an N grade that was equivalent to a GCSE in the subject). Which is why they're often excluded from discussions on degree classifications.

</HE dork>
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Carnationlilyrose
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(Original post by PQ)
Ordinary degrees are a bit of a funny in that they're generally awarded to people who have an overall average percentage that would get them a 3rd but have failed their dissertation (ie they've done quite well in some modules but completely bombed in a couple of others - *usually* including the diss module).

That's why they're equivalent in scotland is awarded after 3 years - because someone leaving a scottish degree after 3 years would have completed some modules at final year "level" but wouldn't have done enough modules/credits accumulated to merit a full degree award.

Also *technically* an ordinary degree is unclassified and is therefore not an "honours" degree - they're kind of like an early exit award that falls between an HND equivalent and an honours degree (like in old A levels if you got an N grade that was equivalent to a GCSE in the subject). Which is why they're often excluded from discussions on degree classifications.

</HE dork>
I stand corrected. (I think.)
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