Billsonbubbles
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#1
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#1
Hi all, I know how to talk about a titration experiment but how do you do the calculations for it ? I would really appreciate It if you could give me an example as well top notch xD but really like help
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ClaraOswald
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(Original post by Billsonbubbles)
Hi all, I know how to talk about a titration experiment but how do you do the calculations for it ? I would really appreciate It if you could give me an example as well top notch xD but really like help
1. Write down reaction equation
2. Work out stochiometric ratio (ratio of products that react, e.g. 1 mole H3PO4 --> 3 moles NaOH). This can easily be done by comparing the number hydrogen and hydroxide ions.
3. Work out number of moles of Solution A (n = c * v)
4. Use this to work out number of moles of solution B
5. Work out concentration using c = n/v

Example - 20cm^3 of 0.1mol/dm^3 NaOH reacts with 25cm^3 HCl. What is the concentration of the HCl?

Hope this helps!

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Billsonbubbles
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#3
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(Original post by ClaraOswald)
1. Write down reaction equation
2. Work out stochiometric ratio (ratio of products that react, e.g. 1 mole H3PO4 --> 3 moles NaOH). This can easily be done by comparing the number hydrogen and hydroxide ions.
3. Work out number of moles of Solution A (n = c * v)
4. Use this to work out number of moles of solution B
5. Work out concentration using c = n/v

Example - 20cm^3 of 0.1mol/dm^3 NaOH reacts with 25cm^3 HCl. What is the concentration of the HCl?

Hope this helps!

Posted from TSR Mobile
Wow! thanks I feel kinda dumb asking that, but what was the n=c*v stand for and c=n/v I think I know but could you help even more :eek:
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ClaraOswald
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(Original post by Billsonbubbles)
Wow! thanks I feel kinda dumb asking that, but what was the n=c*v stand for and c=n/v I think I know but could you help even more :eek:
n = number of moles
C = concentration
V = volume

You can easily check using dimensional analysis on your units for concentration (mol/dm^3 implies it is number of moles divided by dm^3, which is the unit of volume )

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Billsonbubbles
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#5
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(Original post by ClaraOswald)
n = number of molesC = concentrationV = volumeYou can easily check using dimensional analysis on your units for concentration (mol/dm^3 implies it is number of moles divided by dm^3, which is the unit of volume )Posted from TSR Mobile
Thanks, sort of understand it to be honest I don't know how I got an A* in c3, but what do you mean about the hydroxide ions allowing you to work out the moles or something on your first post
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ClaraOswald
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(Original post by Billsonbubbles)
Thanks, sort of understand it to be honest I don't know how I got an A* in c3, but what do you mean about the hydroxide ions allowing you to work out the moles or something on your first post
Oh, it's just a simple neutralization and you know the product will be water, which requires one OH ion and one H+ ion, so you need to get every H+ ion to match up with another OH- ion, depending on which one is in excess. Hope this helps

For example, with sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH), the ratio is simply 1:2 as you want each hydrogen to be matched up with a hydroxide.

Hope this helps.

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Borek
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#7
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Compare http://www.titrations.info/titration-calculation
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