Confused about student finance, grants and loans Watch

Tzchov
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I am a student from the UK and I am struggling to understand what loans and grants I can access as a bachelor who is about to study in the Netherlands starting September 2014.
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Jzd
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Hi, this website provides you with all information considering student finance in the Netherlands: https://www.duo.nl/particulieren/int...es-it-work.asp

As an international student, you should have a look at the part about the nationality requirements, because you might not be entitled to the full Dutch grant (depends on a couple of things, listed on this website)

Hope this is useful
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MartinVanMaas
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To break it down simply:

Two types of aid, study grant (279 Euros a month), or loan (two types of loans)

First of all, study grants are given to anyone who works 56 hours a month (14 hrs a week) or two anyone who is a dependent of someone who works that amount. That's why Dutch students all get the 279 euro study grant, because their parents work. If, as a foreigner, you want the study grant, you must work 14 hrs a week.

There is also another study grant that adds an additional 250 euros (roughly) to the first grant. This additional grant is issued on a need-based basis. This means that if you parents are below a certain income bracket, you can get this grant.

Now for loans.
There are a few different types of loans. The first type is called a full tuition loan. This is a loan that is paid to you in 12 installments, one for every month of the year. This year, the figure was 156 euro a month, amounting to the full tuition cost. This loan collects interest at a rate of 0.8%.

Another loan option available to you is a simple loan where you can borrow whatever amount you need.

All of the above (loans and grants) are given under the premise that you are a full - time student and are also performance based. If you fail to perform (fail to graduate), then any and all money that has been granted to you will be requested back by the Dutch government. So make sure you graduate.

The loans are to be paid back after your study is finished. This means that you don't need to pay anything while being a student, but you are expected to start making payments after graduation.

Hope this info helps!
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mthpossom
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(Original post by MartinVanMaas)
To break it down simply:

Two types of aid, study grant (279 Euros a month), or loan (two types of loans)

First of all, study grants are given to anyone who works 56 hours a month (14 hrs a week) or two anyone who is a dependent of someone who works that amount. That's why Dutch students all get the 279 euro study grant, because their parents work. If, as a foreigner, you want the study grant, you must work 14 hrs a week.

There is also another study grant that adds an additional 250 euros (roughly) to the first grant. This additional grant is issued on a need-based basis. This means that if you parents are below a certain income bracket, you can get this grant.

Now for loans.
There are a few different types of loans. The first type is called a full tuition loan. This is a loan that is paid to you in 12 installments, one for every month of the year. This year, the figure was 156 euro a month, amounting to the full tuition cost. This loan collects interest at a rate of 0.8%.

Another loan option available to you is a simple loan where you can borrow whatever amount you need.

All of the above (loans and grants) are given under the premise that you are a full - time student and are also performance based. If you fail to perform (fail to graduate), then any and all money that has been granted to you will be requested back by the Dutch government. So make sure you graduate.

The loans are to be paid back after your study is finished. This means that you don't need to pay anything while being a student, but you are expected to start making payments after graduation.

Hope this info helps!
Thank you for this post, it's excellent!

I still have a few queries though. I'm a British citizen looking to study for a masters at Rotterdam School of Management and I am NOT looking to work whilst I am in the Netherlands. What would I be entitled to?

I assume I wouldn't get the first study grant, as I wont be working.
Assuming I (my parents) fall in the correct income bracket would I be entitled to the second study grant (roughly 250)?
I also assume I could claim 156 euros a month for tuition?
And would I be able to claim the other loan, enough to cover living costs?

There's a lot of assumptions haha! Thanks for any help!
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