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madting101
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How does salt cause coronary heart disease?
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maarg13
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(Original post by madting101)
How does salt cause coronary heart disease?
I might not be 100% right but I think lots of salt leads to high blood pressure. As a result the arteries (coronary) harden and become thicker to withstand the higher pressure... this creates more pressure etc... Over time this can reduce the lumen of the coronary artery and so reduces the amount of oxygen and glucose getting to the heart and therefore it can't respire= myocardial infarction!?
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Asklepios
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(Original post by madting101)
How does salt cause coronary heart disease?
A high dietary salt intake is a risk factor for hypertension (or high blood pressure). This is because the blood becomes more hypertonic so there will be greater inward osmosis and hence greater water retention.

Hypertension is a risk factor for coronary artery disease because the greater pressure of blood in the arteries damages the endothelium, leading to the progression of atherosclerosis.
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madting101
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(Original post by maarg13)
I might not be 100% right but I think lots of salt leads to high blood pressure. As a result the arteries (coronary) harden and become thicker to withstand the higher pressure... this creates more pressure etc... Over time this can reduce the lumen of the coronary artery and so reduces the amount of oxygen and glucose getting to the heart and therefore it can't respire= myocardial infarction!?
i think i have a rough idea. Basically like you said the high salt intake increases the blood pressure and therefore reduces the diameter of the lumen. As a result the coronary artieries become blocked reducing the amount of oxygen reaching the heart muscle for respiration. Therefore the heart muscle does= mycardial infarction. someone comment if i am right?
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maarg13
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(Original post by madting101)
i think i have a rough idea. Basically like you said the high salt intake increases the blood pressure and therefore reduces the diameter of the lumen. As a result the coronary artieries become blocked reducing the amount of oxygen reaching the heart muscle for respiration. Therefore the heart muscle does= mycardial infarction. someone comment if i am right?
Pretty sure that's just about it
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madting101
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(Original post by Asklepios)
A high dietary salt intake is a risk factor for hypertension (or high blood pressure). This is because the blood becomes more hypertonic so there will be greater inward osmosis and hence greater water retention.

Hypertension is a risk factor for coronary artery disease because the greater pressure of blood in the arteries damages the endothelium, leading to the progression of atherosclerosis.
by the blood becoming more hypertonic does this mean that more water is entering it?
and would this not also be right?
Basically like you said the high salt intake increases the blood pressure and therefore reduces the diameter of the lumen. As a result the coronary artieries become blocked reducing the amount of oxygen reaching the heart muscle for respiration. Therefore the heart muscle does= mycardial infarction.
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(Original post by madting101)
by the blood becoming more hypertonic does this mean that more water is entering it?
and would this not also be right?
Basically like you said the high salt intake increases the blood pressure and therefore reduces the diameter of the lumen. As a result the coronary artieries become blocked reducing the amount of oxygen reaching the heart muscle for respiration. Therefore the heart muscle does= mycardial infarction.
This is basically correct, yes

However, why does increased blood pressure reduce the diameter of the lumen?

It is because the shear stress of the greater blood pressure on the endothelial wall damages it. With this damage you get the accumulation of lipids and then migration of inflammatory cells. This forms a fibro-fatty plaque which reduces the diameter, as you say, which can lead to ischaemic heart disease like angina pectoris.

The main cause for myocardial infarction isn't to do with reduction of the diameter per se. If the plaque ruptures and the inside of it is exposed to the lumen, platelets will stick on to it and form a thrombus (which is like a blood clot but in your arteries). This completely blocks off the coronary artery so the heart muscle will die due to a complete lack of oxygen.
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