Wednesday 14th May exam: English Language AQA A level Watch

saraw26
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#181
Report 4 years ago
#181
(Original post by jesspatterson)
the powerpoint wouldn't open for me
Ah sorry, it wouldn't let me attach it any other way

Don't worry too much about theorists, I hardly mentioned them in my exam

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Heatherjones77
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#182
Report 4 years ago
#182
Could these texts me grouped together through multi modality?

Are they even multimodal? Desperately trying to get groups😒😒😒
Attached files
0
reply
saraw26
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#183
Report 4 years ago
#183
(Original post by BiteMeChilliBoy!)
My english teacher - it's from my notes so i'm quite certain.

I looked at some recommended glossary links as well and it did say the same so I'll be using this.

Here's the link : http://www.usingenglish.com/glossary/

if you check this link

http://www.usingenglish.com/glossary...-modality.html
http://www.usingenglish.com/glossary...-modality.html

Hope this helps
I'll have a look when I'm not on my phone.

But yeah, I've always used it the way I said and got an A last year and on my coursework. So I don't think it matters too much. You'll score marks for stating modal verbs anyway

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
BiteMeChilliBoy!
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#184
Report 4 years ago
#184
(Original post by JoshZ)
I don't know what to believe any more -______- different websites are saying completely different things...
I triple-checked lol!

I'm like 99% sure - i trust my english teacher.

Check these links :

http://www.usingenglish.com/glossary...-modality.html
http://www.usingenglish.com/glossary...-modality.html

0
reply
JoshZ
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#185
Report 4 years ago
#185
Okay, this may sound pretty basic but what is the difference between declaratives and imperatives. I get them mixed up a lot of the time, I know an imperative is a command and a declarative is a statement, for example, I find it hard to distinguish if the following sentence is an imperative or declarative:

"Time's running out... write a letter today"
0
reply
BiteMeChilliBoy!
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#186
Report 4 years ago
#186
(Original post by saraw26)
I'll have a look when I'm not on my phone.

But yeah, I've always used it the way I said and got an A last year and on my coursework. So I don't think it matters too much. You'll score marks for stating modal verbs anyway

Posted from TSR Mobile
Yes, you can just say modal verbs but being specific means you are good at communicating accurately which will score marks.

Let me know what you find please
0
reply
saraw26
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#187
Report 4 years ago
#187
(Original post by JoshZ)
Okay, this may sound pretty basic but what is the difference between declaratives and imperatives. I get them mixed up a lot of the time, I know an imperative is a command and a declarative is a statement, for example, I find it hard to distinguish if the following sentence is an imperative or declarative:

"Time's running out... write a letter today"
Declaratives tell the audience something. Imperative command the audience to do something

The first half of that seems to be declarative and the second half is imperative

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
JoshZ
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#188
Report 4 years ago
#188
(Original post by BiteMeChilliBoy!)
I triple-checked lol!

I'm like 99% sure - i trust my english teacher.

Check these links :

http://www.usingenglish.com/glossary...-modality.html
http://www.usingenglish.com/glossary...-modality.html

Right, just making sure I understand what you're saying...

You're telling me that deontic modality is definitive, for example:

'you will fail your English exam'
'you must know the difference between epistemic & deontic modality'

compared to epistemic modality, which gives a sense of possibility, for example:

'you may fail your English exam'
'you might know the difference between epistemic & deontic modality'

Is this right?
0
reply
BiteMeChilliBoy!
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#189
Report 4 years ago
#189
(Original post by JoshZ)
Okay, this may sound pretty basic but what is the difference between declaratives and imperatives. I get them mixed up a lot of the time, I know an imperative is a command and a declarative is a statement, for example, I find it hard to distinguish if the following sentence is an imperative or declarative:

"Time's running out... write a letter today"
Declarative is basically a statement so 'it's raining today'.

Imperative is a command so it is ordering you to do something so in the example you gave 'Time's running out' will be declarative and the word 'write' will be imperative as it's ordering you to do something.

Hope this makes sense!
0
reply
tssn
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#190
Report 4 years ago
#190
(Original post by jesspatterson)
can someone please share gender theorists that they use?

They key theorist is Lakoff, she states that women..
- Use weak expletives instead of swear words because women are forbidden to swear
- use extensive use of tag questions to not impose views on others
- use the intensifier "so" to avoid strong statements
- dont use taboo language
- dont tell jokes
- use hedges to show uncertainty

O'barr and Atkins
demonstrated that the factor affecting language use is the status of the participant in the interaction, not their gender. They renamed 'womens language' to 'powerless language'

Fishman
Believed that tag Qs were used to facilitate conversation, not to show uncertainty

Zimmerman and West
demonstrated that most interruptions were made from men to women. Men engineer 'womens language' through interruptions

Holmes
believed that tag Qs facilitate conversation
she distinguishes between 2 types of tag Qs:
Faciliative - invites participant to join in
Checking - to retrieve info

Coates
Boys develop a competitive speech style
Girls develop a cooperative speech style

Tannen
Women speak a language of connection and intimacy
Men speak a language of independence

Brief but i hope it helps!
0
reply
BiteMeChilliBoy!
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#191
Report 4 years ago
#191
(Original post by JoshZ)
Right, just making sure I understand what you're saying...

You're telling me that deontic modality is definitive, for example:

'you will fail your English exam'
'you must know the difference between epistemic & deontic modality'

compared to epistemic modality, which gives a sense of possibility, for example:

'you may fail your English exam'
'you might know the difference between epistemic & deontic modality'

Is this right?
Yes, that's what i've been taught and that's what it says in my notes.

And you could've thought of a more happier/better example! Failing is the wrong word to use at this moment in time haha - stay positive and good luck!
0
reply
Heatherjones77
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#192
Report 4 years ago
#192
(Original post by jesspatterson)
can someone please share gender theorists that they use?
Jennifer Coates- She says:
  • Women accept topics that are brought up by men, whereas, men tend to reject topics brought up by women.
  • Men often discuss 'manly' topics
  • Women start conversation topics but are less successful in succeeding in them


Zimmerman and West:
  • Men have dominance in opposite sex conversations.
  • Men interrupt 96% percent of the time


Beattie disagrees with this he says:

  • Most of interruptions made by men are supportive and shows listening.


Cameron:
Conversation differences depend on the situation you are in, not on gender.

Lakoff:
Women tend to use more of:
  • Hedging
  • Empty adjectives
  • Tag questions

Women also tend to swear and speak less.

Dont get to worried about learning ALL of these theorists my teacher said that you only need to use around 2 theorists in any of the two (gender/power). Just pick the ones you understand and will REMEMBER the most.
Good Luck!
0
reply
Rarar
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#193
Report 4 years ago
#193
The examiners aren't going to mark you down if you get terminology mixed up. As long as your point is valid and detailed, they won't mind too much if you get epistemic and deontic mixed up. Unless all your terminology is wrong, they will not mind if you get confused.
0
reply
saraw26
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#194
Report 4 years ago
#194
(Original post by BiteMeChilliBoy!)
Yes, you can just say modal verbs but being specific means you are good at communicating accurately which will score marks.

Let me know what you find please
True, my English teacher always says that the examiner isn't as clever as we always think and will often accept something if it's a high level point even if it's still a little inaccurate. So he says if you don't know what the lexical item then the examiner probably doesn't, so just call it an adverb :lol: basically, you only get a set amount of time, so a few inaccuracies are okay and it's best not to waste time over thinking it

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
iJess
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#195
Report 4 years ago
#195
I need to read through this thread haha, got a U in the mock but we didn't do the full thing only the section b, my teacher said I was basically storytelling :/
0
reply
saraw26
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#196
Report 4 years ago
#196
(Original post by Rarar)
The examiners aren't going to mark you down if you get terminology mixed up. As long as your point is valid and detailed, they won't mind too much if you get epistemic and deontic mixed up. Unless all your terminology is wrong, they will not mind if you get confused.
Haha yeah, just posted about that

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
JoshZ
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#197
Report 4 years ago
#197
(Original post by BiteMeChilliBoy!)
Yes, that's what i've been taught and that's what it says in my notes.

And you could've thought of a more happier/better example! Failing is the wrong word to use at this moment in time haha - stay positive and good luck!
Ok, thanks for that

Deontic = Definitive
0
reply
emmaj125
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#198
Report 4 years ago
#198
Hi, anyone who has got an A either in the real exam or in mock, what groupings did you use? Mine seem too simple or broad and I'm hoping for a high B/A
0
reply
saraw26
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#199
Report 4 years ago
#199
(Original post by emmaj125)
Hi, anyone who has got an A either in the real exam or in mock, what groupings did you use? Mine seem too simple or broad and I'm hoping for a high B/A
Which ones do you normally use? Don't use Audience, Purpose or Genre as a group, they are too broad. You can comment on them after your chosen linguistic feature/framework
0
reply
emmaj125
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#200
Report 4 years ago
#200
(Original post by saraw26)
Which ones do you normally use? Don't use Audience, Purpose or Genre as a group, they are too broad. You can comment on them after your chosen linguistic feature/framework
Yeah they're what I tend to use, what should I aim for instead?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Bath
    Undergraduate Virtual Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 23 Feb '19
  • Ravensbourne University London
    School of Design, School of Media Further education
    Sat, 23 Feb '19
  • Leeds Trinity University
    PGCE Open Day Further education
    Sat, 23 Feb '19

Is the plastic tax enough to protect the environment?

Yes (13)
5.58%
No (220)
94.42%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise