Ethnic minorities WOULD vote for Dave [Cameron] – if only he acted like a Tory

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Teaddict
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"Or so concludes Simon Heffer, writing in the Daily Mail. Heffer's argument can be summarised as such: If the Conservative Party adopted traditional conservative (small and b C) values, then ethnic minority voters would vote for them"


Taken from:
http://www.theconversative.com/comme...d-like-a-tory/

What do you think? Would ethnic minorities vote for the Conservative Party if David Cameron acted more like a 'Tory' ?
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username33685
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So which political party adopting small and big c conservatism are ethnic minority voters currently voting for instead of the Tories then? I assume that any desire they may have to vote for such values are outweighed by the anti-immigration rhetoric coming from the Tory back benches that makes them feel that the party considers them to be second-class citizens.
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meenu89
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I still think many ethnic minorities still remember Enoch Powell.
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JamesGibson
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Is there any evidence to support of these claims? I highly doubt that, by large, ethnic minority voters would support conservative ideology that is staunchly anti-immigration at the moment. In fact, it's been long established that minority groups are far more likely to vote for a progressive Labour Party than they are for a Tory Party who's electorate lies mainly in the aging white middle class.

Cameron has more liberal ideas when it comes to social/culture policy around things like gay marriage, but I don't see why that would deter minority groups.

We shouldn't trust the word of a site called The Conservative.
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gladders
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I think they would, if it weren't for the Tories' stance on immigration. If I were of an ethnic minority, that would put me right off them.
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MatureStudent36
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(Original post by meenu89)
I still think many ethnic minorities still remember Enoch Powell.
Or the misrepresentation of his Rivers of Blood speech.

It's quite surprising how many second and third generation immigrants are speaking out about immigration now though.
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Dr Alcoholic
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(Original post by MatureStudent36)
Or the misrepresentation of his Rivers of Blood speech.

It's quite surprising how many second and third generation immigrants are speaking out about immigration now though.
What was misinterpreted about it?
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meenu89
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(Original post by MatureStudent36)
Or the misrepresentation of his Rivers of Blood speech.

It's quite surprising how many second and third generation immigrants are speaking out about immigration now though.
Indeed.
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MatureStudent36
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(Original post by Dr Alcoholic)
What was misinterpreted about it?
It was taken out if context. Used by the left to vilify the right and used by Ted Heath to get rid of the competition.

Bear in mind that Powell had popular support from the left and the right at the time.

However, returning back to the original question, I think that Powells river of Blood speech as little impact now as it was made nearly 50 years ago.
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Dr Alcoholic
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(Original post by MatureStudent36)
It was taken out if context. Used by the left to vilify the right and used by Ted Heath to get rid of the competition.

Bear in mind that Powell had popular support from the left and the right.

However, returning back to the original question, I think that Powells river of Blood speech as little impact now as it was made nearly 50 years ago.
But what was taken out of context about it though?
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MatureStudent36
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(Original post by Dr Alcoholic)
But what was taken out of context about it though?
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=bCprV87m5Ag
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MagicNMedicine
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I think the analysis in the second link is pretty much spot on.

Ethnic minorities in the UK are more likely to be socially conservative on lots of issues (other than race) than white British, particularly if they are Muslim or from traditional African societies. But the reason they are turned off Tories is because they generally feel excluded by the Conservative party, regardless of what the party leadership says or its token gestures to ethnic minority candidates and so on. At grass roots level a lot of Conservatives fundamentally don't see ethnic minorities as being British, they see Britain as basically a white, Christian country and feel that it was a better place when there were fewer ethnic minorities around. If an asian candidate ran to be leader of the Conservative party a lot of grass roots members, backbench MPs and certainly voters would not want them, regardless of their abilities or political standpoint, they would not be comfortable with the idea of a British Prime Minister with an asian name and / or dark skin. They would argue that they aren't racist but they just don't feel comfortable with that.

However left wing parties are more likely to be accepting of that and I expect the first black or asian leader of a party will come from one of the left wing parties.
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Dr Alcoholic
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"in 15 or 20 years time, the black man will have the whip hand over the white man"?

What exactly about this was misinterpreted?
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Rakas21
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The article does not seem to say anything that we don't already know. On a number of policy areas conservative policy ideals appeal to immigrants. It then goes on to quote a study by Lord Aschcroft which says that despite this, they don't vote for the party because we sound intolerant.

And to be fair, who can blame them. Finding a Tory that thinks before they speak on the subject of immigration (or thinks about what immigrants will think rather than pensioners being swayed by Ukip) is like finding a £50 note on the tube. Very few put across the positive case for immigration and of those that want to reform it, almost exclusively it's rhetoric designed to appeal to Ukip.

Michael Portillo summed it all up perfectly on This Week. By using Ukip rhetoric around immigration rather than skillfully trying to reform it but retaining an aspirational message, the Tories are currently annihilating any hope they have of creating an ethnic minority base.

..

Note i'm not suggesting the party should want open borders, i'm suggesting that 90% of Tory MP's need to shut their mouths about immigration and think about the future of the party, not carry on being blinded by Ukip and the anti-immigrant vote.
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littleangel9914
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(Original post by MagicNMedicine)
I think the analysis in the second link is pretty much spot on.

Ethnic minorities in the UK are more likely to be socially conservative on lots of issues (other than race) than white British, particularly if they are Muslim or from traditional African societies. But the reason they are turned off Tories is because they generally feel excluded by the Conservative party, regardless of what the party leadership says or its token gestures to ethnic minority candidates and so on. At grass roots level a lot of Conservatives fundamentally don't see ethnic minorities as being British, they see Britain as basically a white, Christian country and feel that it was a better place when there were fewer ethnic minorities around. If an asian candidate ran to be leader of the Conservative party a lot of grass roots members, backbench MPs and certainly voters would not want them, regardless of their abilities or political standpoint, they would not be comfortable with the idea of a British Prime Minister with an asian name and / or dark skin. They would argue that they aren't racist but they just don't feel comfortable with that.

However left wing parties are more likely to be accepting of that and I expect the first black or asian leader of a party will come from one of the left wing parties.
Really I think they're just as likely as the left to have an ethnic minority leader if they felt that person was right for the job and not just because they're from an ethnic minority to look all "progressive" like the left. I mean they're the only major party to have had a female leader.
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MatureStudent36
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(Original post by Dr Alcoholic)
"in 15 or 20 years time, the black man will have the whip hand over the white man"?

What exactly about this was misinterpreted?
Well firstly, Powell never made that statement. That statement was a quote from a letter that he received from one of his constituents. You now, the people who's viewpoints an MP is elected to represent.

So there's the first bit of 'out of context' we've addressed.
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Dr Alcoholic
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(Original post by MatureStudent36)
Well firstly, Powell never made that statement. That statement was a quote from a letter that he received from one of his constituents. You now, the people who's viewpoints an MP is elected to represent.

So there's the first bit of 'out of context' we've addressed.

So what exactly was he addressing in his speech then? Did he agree with his constituent or not?
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Rlove95
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As an ethnic minority person coming from an ethnic minority family with ethnic minority friends, I and they would most likely not vote for Conservative if they became more conservative, in fact it'd probably be the reverse, we would be less likely to vote for them than now. Most of the people who I know that are ethnic minorities are staunch labour voters cause generally labour has been more sympathetic to issues that affect ethnic minorities whereas Tories are associated more with the 'rich white man' (even if this isn't necessarily true). Don't get me wrong I know a few ethnic minority people who would vote or are planning to vote for them but they would be less likely to if they became more conservative since these ethnic minorities that I know more centrist than proper right-wing.
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Rlove95
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I think I'd be more likely to vote for Conservatives, if more of the members were like Boris Johnson. He rejected the growing view that immigrants are the problem of society and that immigrants should not be welcomed in some article. He acknowledged the positive contributions of immigrants and I admire him for that especially since Conservatives are so quick to try win back UKIP voters and are happy to adopt the 'immigrants not welcome' approach to politics, in fact Labour has become quite silent on the issue in fear of angering the electorate so for a politician to stand up and say no to scapegoating I think is admirable. Although he could be just saying that because he knows London is a diverse area and wants to be voted Mayor again, I don't know.
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Reformed2010
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(Original post by Rlove95)
I think I'd be more likely to vote for Conservatives, if more of the members were like Boris Johnson. He rejected the growing view that immigrants are the problem of society and that immigrants should not be welcomed in some article. He acknowledged the positive contributions of immigrants and I admire him for that especially since Conservatives are so quick to try win back UKIP voters and are happy to adopt the 'immigrants not welcome' approach to politics, in fact Labour has become quite silent on the issue in fear of angering the electorate so for a politician to stand up and say no to scapegoating I think is admirable. Although he could be just saying that because he knows London is a diverse area and wants to be voted Mayor again, I don't know.
Well he had to considering he ran for Mayor of the most diverse cities in the world, London. The cynic in me says he doesn't really believe in multiculturalism as much.
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