Emperor Sheev
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
Hello there, I am a little bit confused as to whether an organic reaction involving (nucleophilic?) substation or elimination involves a nucleophile or a base. So what i need to know is how to distinguish between the two? as i tend to lose marks when it asks to identify in AQA AS level Chemistry Unit 2. Thanks in advance
0
reply
EierVonSatan
Badges: 21
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
A strong base is usually a good nucleophile, it's not one or the other.
0
reply
Emperor Sheev
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#3
(Original post by EierVonSatan)
A strong base is usually a good nucleophile, it's not one or the other.
I understand what you are saying but there are questions that crop up such as: "What is the role of the hydroxide ion in the reaction?" and they except an answer like "it is a base" and they explicitly state that they do not accept nucleophile as an answer. Why is this?
0
reply
EierVonSatan
Badges: 21
#4
Report 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by Jatyization)
I understand what you are saying but there are questions that crop up such as: "What is the role of the hydroxide ion in the reaction?" and they except an answer like "it is a base" and they explicitly state that they do not accept nucleophile as an answer. Why is this?
The question is asking about the role that the species is playing in a given reaction.

If it's an elimination of HCl from a haloalkane - then OH- is acting as a base (by removing a proton)

If it's a nucleophilic substituion of a haloalkane - then OH- is acting as a nucleophile

So it can act as either (determined by reaction conditions) and you have to decide which In reality the two are in competition and you get a bit of both, but with careful control one is much favoured over the other.
0
reply
Emperor Sheev
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#5
(Original post by EierVonSatan)
The question is asking about the role that the species is playing in a given reaction.

If it's an elimination of HCl from a haloalkane - then OH- is acting as a base (by removing a proton)

If it's a nucleophilic substituion of a haloalkane - then OH- is acting as a nucleophile

So it can act as either (determined by reaction conditions) and you have to decide which In reality the two are in competition and you get a bit of both, but with careful control one is much favoured over the other.
Oh right! okay that makes it so much more clearer... Thanks i appreciate the help
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How do you prefer to get careers advice?

I like to speak to my friends and family (6)
8.45%
I like to do my own research online using careers specific websites (50)
70.42%
I like speaking to the careers advisors at school, college or uni (10)
14.08%
I prefer to listen watch videos or listen to podcasts of people in my chosen career (4)
5.63%
Something else (let us know in the thread) (1)
1.41%

Watched Threads

View All