Good food diet before examinations? Watch

Acidy
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What's good to eat for an evening meal, the day prior to your examinations. And what is good to eat for breakfast, prior to daily examinations?
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MrKappa
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There aren't any 'special' foods to boost brain power if that's what you're looking for.
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somegirlcalledea
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My teacher told us to eat bananas and flapjacks! Not sure how great they are though :yes:

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SirDigbyChicken
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Six pack of redbull and a chicken vindaloo
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hermitthefrog
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I always try and eat more fish in exam period. Doubt it helps at all, but whatever, it can't have a negative effect either so why not


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Jkizer
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Cold chinese takeout will work wonders
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princess:)
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just healthy ones i guess fish, avocado and probs bananas are things that i have heard are good

and PLENTY of water
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crosbycasey56
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Eat brain-boosting food. This includes protein-rich foods which can lead to greater mental alertness. Healthy food choices on exam day include eggs, nuts, yogurt, and cottage cheese. Good breakfast combinations might be whole-grain cereal with low-fat milk, eggs and toast with jam, porridge, oatmeal, or sugar-free muesli.



Other dietary choices considered to be brain foods are fish, walnuts, blueberries, sunflower seeds, flaxseed, dried fruits, figs, and prunes.
Although unproven, many consider fruit to provide excellent brain fuel, which can help you think faster and remember more easily. You could eat cantaloupes, oranges, strawberries, blueberries, or bananas, which are especially popular.
In terms of vegetables, raw carrots, bell peppers, Brussels sprouts, spinach, broccoli, and asparagus are good choices.
Avoid brain blocking foods. On exam day, stay away from foods made of white flour, such as cookies, cakes, and muffins, which require added time and energy to digest. Also avoid foods that are high in refined sugar, such as chocolates, desserts, and candies.
Do not have turkey before an exam as it contains L-tryptophan, an essential amino acid which makes you feel sleepy. Also avoid certain food combinations such as protein and starch together. These substances require added time when they have to be digested together.
When eaten alone, carbohydrates make you feel more relaxed than alert. So carbs are a good option for the day before the exam, but not on the actual exam day. In addition, carbs such as rice or potatoes, eaten in large quantities, can make you feel heavy and sleepy.
Avoid foods that a high in sugar, such as chocolates, desserts, and candies. They will send you off on sugar highs and lows — the opposite of stabilizing you during your long exam.
Drink brain boosting beverages. Make sure you drink enough water before and during your exam. Tea also works, though without a lot of sugar. Dehydration can make you lose your concentration, feel faint, and sap your energy. Don’t wait till you’re thirsty to drink a glass of water. If you wait till you’re thirsty, it means your body is already a little dehydrated..



Eat light meals. Eat enough to feel satisfied but not so much as to feel full. If you eat a big breakfast or lunch before an exam, you will feel drowsy and heavy. Your body’s energy will be focused on the digestive process rather than on providing your brain with the energy it needs to function efficiently. Instead, try a light lunch such as a salad with chicken or salmon.
Don’t try any new foods, drinks, or supplements just before the exam, even if they come highly recommended by friends or family. You don’t know how your body responds to them and you don’t want any surprises on exam day. Stick with food and drink your body is accustomed to.

Consider taking multivitamins.
Most students do not eat a healthy balanced diet. When you survive on pizza, junk food, Red Bull, and coffee, your body ends up with a lack of essential vitamins and minerals. A multivitamin can help. The B vitamins especially strengthen brain functioning. Iron, calcium, and zinc can boost your body’s ability to handle stress.

Snack intelligently. In some countries, you are given a five- to ten-minute break in the middle of a long exam. Carry healthy snacks, such as protein bars, trail mix, energy bars, granola bars, almonds, walnuts, or fruit for such times, to keep your energy high. Avoid chocolates or sweet treats as the energy high could be followed by an energy crash during your exam!

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Acidy
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(Original post by somegirlcalledea)
My teacher told us to eat bananas and flapjacks! Not sure how great they are though :yes:

Posted from TSR Mobile
(Original post by hermitthefrog)
I always try and eat more fish in exam period. Doubt it helps at all, but whatever, it can't have a negative effect either so why not


Posted from TSR Mobile
(Original post by princess:))
just healthy ones i guess fish, avocado and probs bananas are things that i have heard are good

and PLENTY of water
(Original post by crosbycasey56)
Eat brain-boosting food. This includes protein-rich foods which can lead to greater mental alertness. Healthy food choices on exam day include eggs, nuts, yogurt, and cottage cheese. Good breakfast combinations might be whole-grain cereal with low-fat milk, eggs and toast with jam, porridge, oatmeal, or sugar-free muesli.



Other dietary choices considered to be brain foods are fish, walnuts, blueberries, sunflower seeds, flaxseed, dried fruits, figs, and prunes.
Although unproven, many consider fruit to provide excellent brain fuel, which can help you think faster and remember more easily. You could eat cantaloupes, oranges, strawberries, blueberries, or bananas, which are especially popular.
In terms of vegetables, raw carrots, bell peppers, Brussels sprouts, spinach, broccoli, and asparagus are good choices.
Avoid brain blocking foods. On exam day, stay away from foods made of white flour, such as cookies, cakes, and muffins, which require added time and energy to digest. Also avoid foods that are high in refined sugar, such as chocolates, desserts, and candies.
Do not have turkey before an exam as it contains L-tryptophan, an essential amino acid which makes you feel sleepy. Also avoid certain food combinations such as protein and starch together. These substances require added time when they have to be digested together.
When eaten alone, carbohydrates make you feel more relaxed than alert. So carbs are a good option for the day before the exam, but not on the actual exam day. In addition, carbs such as rice or potatoes, eaten in large quantities, can make you feel heavy and sleepy.
Avoid foods that a high in sugar, such as chocolates, desserts, and candies. They will send you off on sugar highs and lows — the opposite of stabilizing you during your long exam.
Drink brain boosting beverages. Make sure you drink enough water before and during your exam. Tea also works, though without a lot of sugar. Dehydration can make you lose your concentration, feel faint, and sap your energy. Don’t wait till you’re thirsty to drink a glass of water. If you wait till you’re thirsty, it means your body is already a little dehydrated..



Eat light meals. Eat enough to feel satisfied but not so much as to feel full. If you eat a big breakfast or lunch before an exam, you will feel drowsy and heavy. Your body’s energy will be focused on the digestive process rather than on providing your brain with the energy it needs to function efficiently. Instead, try a light lunch such as a salad with chicken or salmon.
Don’t try any new foods, drinks, or supplements just before the exam, even if they come highly recommended by friends or family. You don’t know how your body responds to them and you don’t want any surprises on exam day. Stick with food and drink your body is accustomed to.

Consider taking multivitamins.
Most students do not eat a healthy balanced diet. When you survive on pizza, junk food, Red Bull, and coffee, your body ends up with a lack of essential vitamins and minerals. A multivitamin can help. The B vitamins especially strengthen brain functioning. Iron, calcium, and zinc can boost your body’s ability to handle stress.

Snack intelligently. In some countries, you are given a five- to ten-minute break in the middle of a long exam. Carry healthy snacks, such as protein bars, trail mix, energy bars, granola bars, almonds, walnuts, or fruit for such times, to keep your energy high. Avoid chocolates or sweet treats as the energy high could be followed by an energy crash during your exam!

Thanks a lot. This is great, especially the tips from Casey.
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crosbycasey56
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(Original post by Acidy)
Thanks a lot. This is great, especially the tips from Casey.
its alright good luck
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