Former drop out, support and advice would be nice :) Watch

geebeeiii
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Hi everyone

Now just to launch into my situation:

I originally went to university starting in september 2012, 18 years old, first time away from home etc doing a History BA. However, I dropped out of uni after a term and a bit because I was really really ill with depression and anxiety to the point where I was very agoraphobic and couldn't function safely so I went home. Since then I've been recovering and doing 'normal' jobs, mainly in retail whilst spending a lot of time figuring what to do.

You see the thing is, I chose History the first time because I got an A in my A-Level and I found it interesting and was good at it. However, I wasn't interested in any of the career paths afterwards and just did it because I felt like I had to go to uni to prove something to other people. I realise now what a stupid system that was for me. I tried to reapply last year as in to start last September but I ended up abandoning it because I still didn't know what to do and was still sort of ill.

Anyway, I decided that I wanted to go back as a mature student because given that I barely got on with 18 year olds when I was 18 myself I didn't want to end up in with them too much again. I mean, when I was there the first time all my friends plus my boyfriend were mature students. Besides, I also am not particularly interested in reliving freshers. Not that I don't want to go out etc but going out and getting drunk 3 or 4 times a week is not a part of my life anymore. So I decided to wait until this coming autumn when UCAS reopens to reapply to go the following year. By then I will be 21 which is young for a 'mature' student but honestly I think I've earned the title given what I've gone through. Also, for the first time in my life I know what I want to do and I can't wait to start doing it. I'm going to be applying for screenwriting courses, fyi.

Anyway, it would just be nice to know that there are other mature students out there with a similar outlook (wanting to socialise without 24/7 clubbing) who are passionate about their chosen subjects. Also that there is an actual community on here to ask questions because I am so confused by the application process. I think I can still get a reference from my old college tutor for sure, but will I need relevant experience to back it up having been out of education for almost 3 years by that point? Will universities accept submissions of examples of my writing to this end? Also I'm still paying back student finance for THEIR mistake of an overpayment which they didn't inform me of til long after I left uni which has made me a little worried about reapplying for a loan, though I should be done paying them by around November this year.

And did anyone else drop out or have a similar bad experience of education before who is a bit apprehensive of a return?
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kittywack
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(Original post by geebeeiii)
Hi everyone

Now just to launch into my situation:

I originally went to university starting in september 2012, 18 years old, first time away from home etc doing a History BA. However, I dropped out of uni after a term and a bit because I was really really ill with depression and anxiety to the point where I was very agoraphobic and couldn't function safely so I went home. Since then I've been recovering and doing 'normal' jobs, mainly in retail whilst spending a lot of time figuring what to do.

You see the thing is, I chose History the first time because I got an A in my A-Level and I found it interesting and was good at it. However, I wasn't interested in any of the career paths afterwards and just did it because I felt like I had to go to uni to prove something to other people. I realise now what a stupid system that was for me. I tried to reapply last year as in to start last September but I ended up abandoning it because I still didn't know what to do and was still sort of ill.

Anyway, I decided that I wanted to go back as a mature student because given that I barely got on with 18 year olds when I was 18 myself I didn't want to end up in with them too much again. I mean, when I was there the first time all my friends plus my boyfriend were mature students. Besides, I also am not particularly interested in reliving freshers. Not that I don't want to go out etc but going out and getting drunk 3 or 4 times a week is not a part of my life anymore. So I decided to wait until this coming autumn when UCAS reopens to reapply to go the following year. By then I will be 21 which is young for a 'mature' student but honestly I think I've earned the title given what I've gone through. Also, for the first time in my life I know what I want to do and I can't wait to start doing it. I'm going to be applying for screenwriting courses, fyi.

Anyway, it would just be nice to know that there are other mature students out there with a similar outlook (wanting to socialise without 24/7 clubbing) who are passionate about their chosen subjects. Also that there is an actual community on here to ask questions because I am so confused by the application process. I think I can still get a reference from my old college tutor for sure, but will I need relevant experience to back it up having been out of education for almost 3 years by that point? Will universities accept submissions of examples of my writing to this end? Also I'm still paying back student finance for THEIR mistake of an overpayment which they didn't inform me of til long after I left uni which has made me a little worried about reapplying for a loan, though I should be done paying them by around November this year.

And did anyone else drop out or have a similar bad experience of education before who is a bit apprehensive of a return?
Hi There,

I had an almost identical experience to you years ago. I started a degree (although it was self funded) and became very depressed. I lost all faith in my ability to cope with the lectures as there were too many people. I used to just break down, often on the way to a lecture and then was too embarrassed to go in because I had been crying, so just returned 'home' to my shared accommodation - that's if I eve managed to leave the house... I missed a lot of classes.

My house-mates were not supportive at all, although we usually got on very well and had a great first year in halls. Then we all moved to a house together, eight of us, 6 guys and two girls. After the first year and as soon as I started to get ill, things changed. They didn't understand why I was changing and so upset and needy all the time, and to be honest neither did I. Like you, I had also realised that I didn't want to be a Geologist. My decision to take the course was largely based on the A-Level course I did which I really loved. Unfortunately, it just wasn't the same at Uni and the jobs prospects were not for me.

I felt very guilty as my parents were funding me and I also felt very alone. I had moved away from home for the first time to a whole new world. I had quite a sheltered upbringing back home and although back then I was very hedonistic, my new found friends were far more 'worldly' than I was. With the amount of drinking and drug-taking that was going on in the house, I am genuinely surprised that any of us completed our courses.

So eventually I plucked up the courage to admit to my parents that it was not going well, packed in the course and returned home with a 24 inch waist - a full stone lighter that when I had left. So, bearing all this in mind and how our stories are similar in many ways, you have my sympathy regarding your first attempt at a degree.

Now I am 32 and it has taken me all these years of working in an office to finally decide what it is I want to do in life. I want to be a veterinary nurse. I have absolutely no interest in drinking etc any more and I finally feel able to study hard and get want I want out of life. If successful I will be living at home and travelling daily to the college that runs my course. If I feel the need I will even move closer. Luckily my husband can just about support us while I study.

If it helps you, I also new plenty of people that went to my old university (Plymouth) that did not go our drinking and partying all the time. I would suggest if you are going into halls and you think the people you are with are too crazy, apply to move. Or try other types of accommodation. My friend moved in with a host family and did very well at university. I am only a little apprehensive about going back and it is because of money - it will be a struggle! Also because I definitely don't want to drop out again, no way. I guess it's that once bitten twice shy feeling.

I have read that if you have already completed a degree (even self funded) you are not eligible for a loan. However, I can't find any information re eligibility if you dropped out of your original degree.

So if any one is reading this and knows - please let us know!

Thanks,
Laura
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geebeeiii
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(Original post by kittywack)
Hi There,

I had an almost identical experience to you years ago. I started a degree (although it was self funded) and became very depressed. I lost all faith in my ability to cope with the lectures as there were too many people. I used to just break down, often on the way to a lecture and then was too embarrassed to go in because I had been crying, so just returned 'home' to my shared accommodation - that's if I eve managed to leave the house... I missed a lot of classes.

My house-mates were not supportive at all, although we usually got on very well and had a great first year in halls. Then we all moved to a house together, eight of us, 6 guys and two girls. After the first year and as soon as I started to get ill, things changed. They didn't understand why I was changing and so upset and needy all the time, and to be honest neither did I. Like you, I had also realised that I didn't want to be a Geologist. My decision to take the course was largely based on the A-Level course I did which I really loved. Unfortunately, it just wasn't the same at Uni and the jobs prospects were not for me.

I felt very guilty as my parents were funding me and I also felt very alone. I had moved away from home for the first time to a whole new world. I had quite a sheltered upbringing back home and although back then I was very hedonistic, my new found friends were far more 'worldly' than I was. With the amount of drinking and drug-taking that was going on in the house, I am genuinely surprised that any of us completed our courses.

So eventually I plucked up the courage to admit to my parents that it was not going well, packed in the course and returned home with a 24 inch waist - a full stone lighter that when I had left. So, bearing all this in mind and how our stories are similar in many ways, you have my sympathy regarding your first attempt at a degree.

Now I am 32 and it has taken me all these years of working in an office to finally decide what it is I want to do in life. I want to be a veterinary nurse. I have absolutely no interest in drinking etc any more and I finally feel able to study hard and get want I want out of life. If successful I will be living at home and travelling daily to the college that runs my course. If I feel the need I will even move closer. Luckily my husband can just about support us while I study.

If it helps you, I also new plenty of people that went to my old university (Plymouth) that did not go our drinking and partying all the time. I would suggest if you are going into halls and you think the people you are with are too crazy, apply to move. Or try other types of accommodation. My friend moved in with a host family and did very well at university. I am only a little apprehensive about going back and it is because of money - it will be a struggle! Also because I definitely don't want to drop out again, no way. I guess it's that once bitten twice shy feeling.

I have read that if you have already completed a degree (even self funded) you are not eligible for a loan. However, I can't find any information re eligibility if you dropped out of your original degree.

So if any one is reading this and knows - please let us know!

Thanks,
Laura
As far as I know I'm alright to reapply once the repayment is done but it's definitely something I have to look into. Student Finance England are so unapproachable though!

I went the other way and put weight on at university- I went from a size 10 to a 14 I hope it won't happen again this time!

I was actually thinking of going into privately rented accommodation this time. Like I would be living with other students but not in a halls environment because that's the part I most dread the idea of going back to. I despised my halls last time because I felt like I was on Big Brother with zero privacy or quiet at any time. I actually went from a much more worldly environment having grown up in London into a smaller town (Canterbury) so it was kind of the opposite though not without the same pitfalls you describe. I'd been sort of going out since I was sixteen and drinking but in nice environments like nice bars etc and I'd always stayed away from any of the nastier stuff like drugs. However when I got there most people had come from small towns and were quite sheltered so jumped straight into that kind of stuff and I'd never been able to see the appeal so I couldn't really relate to them which I guess is why I ended up better friends with the mature students.

I got on with my flatmates most of the time but they didn't understand or even notice how ill I was. They were actually pretty nasty to me because I was being irrational. I know I wasn't easy to live with but when I moved in with them I told them I had mental health problems already so I would have thought they'd have at least tried to be more empathetic but they weren't at all.

It's been really reassuring to read about your experience though because I've always felt a bit like an alien. I know a couple of other people who dropped out but for different reasons, although I do know one girl who got severely ill with anorexia. But she reapplied the following year so she doesn't have the mature student experience I will. Thanks so much for replying to this thread! I would definitely appreciate it if anyone knew anymore about the loan situation. I can't afford to fund my own degree. I'm on minimum wage, lol.
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I dropped out of uni last year due to anxiety. Going again this year to a uni closer to home, this way if it all gets too much again, going home for the weekend or whatever is a viable option. I regret letting anxiety have this much control over my life, I perform poorly in exams because of it and it has ruined my chances of getting into a better uni but c'est la vie, I'll just have to get on with it.
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kittywack
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No problem, likewise it is nice to speak to someone who has had a similar experience :-)

I will post on here any useful information that I find and in the meantime best of luck. If you have any more questions let me know as well and I'll be more than happy to help if I can. As you say, it's probably a good idea to move into a shared house rather than halls or move in with a family like a lodger. That way you can really get away from it all if you want to and study hard. Also remember if you don't like something including the place you live, you have a voice and the option to change it. Just look into different accommodation etc. It may cost some money to change accommodation but if it is the difference between passing or not passing your degree then it's worth the money. Also, you don't have to do all three years back to back. You are still young so if at the end of the first year you feel you need a break, apply to defer your 2nd year and go back and continue the year after. I don't know everything about it but I am quite sure you can do that if you need to.

All the best,
Laura
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geebeeiii
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(Original post by HugoDuchovny)
Seriously, what is with the current generation of utter weaklings.

Anxiety, Depression, Social Nervousness

There are kids in war torn poor countries desperate for a chance at education, some have to walk a ridiculous number of miles to school, others have to work all night to be able to go to school/university in the morning.

And here in the UK, a country with one of the world's best education systems, with the government GIVING MONEY for education, I here of so many dropout/failure cases due to "anxiety, depression, etc".

Unless a family member died, or a traumatic experience occurred or something genuinely serious, most of these individuals are just goddamn lazy fools.

Anxiety and depression are two of the most overdiagnosed medical conditions. Most people have anxiety and depression, it's a part of life. The sensible majority just get over it, get their sh*t together and get sh*t done.
Depression and anxiety are genuine mental health problems. I would dare say that you've never actually suffered from either. Depression and anxiety are not just feeling a bit sad or worried. It's not up to anyone who suffers them to justify why they have it to the likes of you who lacks a basic understanding of the underlying issues. For your information, I had gone through several traumatic experiences before university- losing three family members, a sexual assault and almost losing my mother to a traumatic illness alongside several other earlier issues from childhood. Is that enough of a reason to have a few problems for you? Nobody is saying there aren't people with worse things going on but that doesn't change the fact that many people have to live day in and day out with a little voice in their head that tells them everything is their fault, they're worthless, something is going to get them, they can't do anything and the world would be a better place without them. And nobody should have to.

Perhaps instead of dumping your bitter ignorance upon a generation you're removed from you should have a look at yourself. Maybe if people like you didn't go around making *****y comments like this then it would be less commonplace. You're clearly one of those fortunate people who don't have those problems so count yourself lucky instead of attacking the less fortunate.
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kittywack
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(Original post by HugoDuchovny)
Seriously, what is with the current generation of utter weaklings.

Anxiety, Depression, Social Nervousness

There are kids in war torn poor countries desperate for a chance at education, some have to walk a ridiculous number of miles to school, others have to work all night to be able to go to school/university in the morning.

And here in the UK, a country with one of the world's best education systems, with the government GIVING MONEY for education, I here of so many dropout/failure cases due to "anxiety, depression, etc".

Unless a family member died, or a traumatic experience occurred or something genuinely serious, most of these individuals are just goddamn lazy fools.

Anxiety and depression are two of the most overdiagnosed medical conditions. Most people have anxiety and depression, it's a part of life. The sensible majority just get over it, get their sh*t together and get sh*t done.

I'm sure some young people (and it's not exactly crime of the century) have used depression as a handy excuse to drop out of a degree and keep their dignity instead of admitting they were failing. You may be confusing these students with those people in the UK who are who are as you say 'lazy'. Yes, certainly there are many who jump on the bandwagon when it comes to the 'unseen' disorders like anxiety, depression, 'ME' (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis)or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. The reason being they get something out of it, a 'Pardon' for not working maybe, supported by our benefits system.

I strongly dislike the fact that you seem to have read our posts and think that we are this sort of person. They would not be trying to start another degree!!

These people give genuine sufferers not only a bad name but, even worse than that, they help fuel the stigma that is attached to an already difficult medical condition that for the suffers only makes it worse and also makes them hide it from people. I believe the people that are actually suffering with depression are the least likely to mention it in a social setting. It sometimes can take years to even tell the doctor.

Depression is a bit different to just being sad, when you can brush yourself off and 'get over it'. If fact, the inability to 'get over it' is probably quite a good definition of depression.

Anxiety and depression are all too real for millions of people both in and out of the UK. It may surprise you to know that many of those poor people who have the misfortune to live in war torn or famine ridden countries also suffer from these conditions but it goes largely unreported and they do not have the knowledge or means to treat it anyway. I am just thankful I live in the UK.

Depression is caused by many different things. Your assumption that someone must have died or some massive trauma must have occurred in order for depression to start, while true for many people, is not true for all sufferers. There was no trauma in my life at all in my teens or before but I am prone to anxiety (and therefore depression which can be caused by anxiety) as a result of inherited genes/ personality traits from my mother's side of the family.

I suffered with depression at university for the first time in my second year, it started as a result of a bad relationship, so not really a 'Massive Trauma' in your books I would think. I think also alcohol and drug use also contributed. At the time I did not take medication as foolishly I didn't 'believe in it' I thought it was harmful, another common misconception. It just got worse and worse until I took an overdose and then quit uni.

For many years I was depression free until it reappeared later in life after a serious trauma and I have taken medication ever since and lead a normal life thanks to the wonders of science. I have had anxiety however of varying degrees ever since university. I have hyperventilation/ panic attack many times a year, nearly every year. It's annoying but again thanks to modern medicine, I can manage it well enough.

All through those years I have held down a job 9-5 and made a career for myself. I have even started my own business. I was also among the top of my class at university at the end of the 1st year before my troubles started.

What really angers me is that you would post your ignorant bullsh*t onto a thread from someone who is asking for 'support and advice'. Especially someone who is prone to suffer from depression. Seriously, did you think you would HELP anyone by posting your comments?

What you are doing is one step away from Trolling and you are not welcome here. In my opinion your black & white attitude to something you clearly know little about should be saved for a different forum, or even better, kept to yourself. There are many thing worse than being a 'lazy student drop out' and posting offensive, detrimental, bad-tempered and uncalled for rants onto forums intended to HELP is one of them.

By the way, at any time you can apologise for causing offence.
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geebeeiii
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(Original post by kittywack)
I'm sure some young people (and it's not exactly crime of the century) have used depression as a handy excuse to drop out of a degree and keep their dignity instead of admitting they were failing. You may be confusing these students with those people in the UK who are who are as you say 'lazy'. Yes, certainly there are many who jump on the bandwagon when it comes to the 'unseen' disorders like anxiety, depression, 'ME' (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis)or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. The reason being they get something out of it, a 'Pardon' for not working maybe, supported by our benefits system.

I strongly dislike the fact that you seem to have read our posts and think that we are this sort of person. They would not be trying to start another degree!!

These people give genuine sufferers not only a bad name but, even worse than that, they help fuel the stigma that is attached to an already difficult medical condition that for the suffers only makes it worse and also makes them hide it from people. I believe the people that are actually suffering with depression are the least likely to mention it in a social setting. It sometimes can take years to even tell the doctor.

Depression is a bit different to just being sad, when you can brush yourself off and 'get over it'. If fact, the inability to 'get over it' is probably quite a good definition of depression.

Anxiety and depression are all too real for millions of people both in and out of the UK. It may surprise you to know that many of those poor people who have the misfortune to live in war torn or famine ridden countries also suffer from these conditions but it goes largely unreported and they do not have the knowledge or means to treat it anyway. I am just thankful I live in the UK.

Depression is caused by many different things. Your assumption that someone must have died or some massive trauma must have occurred in order for depression to start, while true for many people, is not true for all sufferers. There was no trauma in my life at all in my teens or before but I am prone to anxiety (and therefore depression which can be caused by anxiety) as a result of inherited genes/ personality traits from my mother's side of the family.

I suffered with depression at university for the first time in my second year, it started as a result of a bad relationship, so not really a 'Massive Trauma' in your books I would think. I think also alcohol and drug use also contributed. At the time I did not take medication as foolishly I didn't 'believe in it' I thought it was harmful, another common misconception. It just got worse and worse until I took an overdose and then quit uni.

For many years I was depression free until it reappeared later in life after a serious trauma and I have taken medication ever since and lead a normal life thanks to the wonders of science. I have had anxiety however of varying degrees ever since university. I have hyperventilation/ panic attack many times a year, nearly every year. It's annoying but again thanks to modern medicine, I can manage it well enough.

All through those years I have held down a job 9-5 and made a career for myself. I have even started my own business. I was also among the top of my class at university at the end of the 1st year before my troubles started.

What really angers me is that you would post your ignorant bullsh*t onto a thread from someone who is asking for 'support and advice'. Especially someone who is prone to suffer from depression. Seriously, did you think you would HELP anyone by posting your comments?

What you are doing is one step away from Trolling and you are not welcome here. In my opinion your black & white attitude to something you clearly know little about should be saved for a different forum, or even better, kept to yourself. There are many thing worse than being a 'lazy student drop out' and posting offensive, detrimental, bad-tempered and uncalled for rants onto forums intended to HELP is one of them.

By the way, at any time you can apologise for causing offence.
I could not have put it better myself. I don't doubt there are a lot of people who aren't really depressed but I actually believe the modern age has made it much more widespread.
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WGR
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(Original post by geebeeiii)
Hi everyone

Now just to launch into my situation:

I originally went to university starting in september 2012, 18 years old, first time away from home etc doing a History BA. However, I dropped out of uni after a term and a bit because I was really really ill with depression and anxiety to the point where I was very agoraphobic and couldn't function safely so I went home. Since then I've been recovering and doing 'normal' jobs, mainly in retail whilst spending a lot of time figuring what to do.

You see the thing is, I chose History the first time because I got an A in my A-Level and I found it interesting and was good at it. However, I wasn't interested in any of the career paths afterwards and just did it because I felt like I had to go to uni to prove something to other people. I realise now what a stupid system that was for me. I tried to reapply last year as in to start last September but I ended up abandoning it because I still didn't know what to do and was still sort of ill.

Anyway, I decided that I wanted to go back as a mature student because given that I barely got on with 18 year olds when I was 18 myself I didn't want to end up in with them too much again. I mean, when I was there the first time all my friends plus my boyfriend were mature students. Besides, I also am not particularly interested in reliving freshers. Not that I don't want to go out etc but going out and getting drunk 3 or 4 times a week is not a part of my life anymore. So I decided to wait until this coming autumn when UCAS reopens to reapply to go the following year. By then I will be 21 which is young for a 'mature' student but honestly I think I've earned the title given what I've gone through. Also, for the first time in my life I know what I want to do and I can't wait to start doing it. I'm going to be applying for screenwriting courses, fyi.

Anyway, it would just be nice to know that there are other mature students out there with a similar outlook (wanting to socialise without 24/7 clubbing) who are passionate about their chosen subjects. Also that there is an actual community on here to ask questions because I am so confused by the application process. I think I can still get a reference from my old college tutor for sure, but will I need relevant experience to back it up having been out of education for almost 3 years by that point? Will universities accept submissions of examples of my writing to this end? Also I'm still paying back student finance for THEIR mistake of an overpayment which they didn't inform me of til long after I left uni which has made me a little worried about reapplying for a loan, though I should be done paying them by around November this year.

And did anyone else drop out or have a similar bad experience of education before who is a bit apprehensive of a return?
Are you me?

I don't think you should go back right now. You haven't given any suggestion that you found a new career that you're passionate about, sounds to me like you're just going back because "it's the thing to do". I'm gonna get a lot of hate but a history degree is a waste of time career wise. You would probably get further in your career if you just did an apprenticeship or something. If you had said that you wanted to be an engineer or doctor or architect then I'd say yeah go back but sounds to me that you're just going back because you a) like history and b) you feel like you should be at university.
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geebeeiii
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(Original post by WGR)
Are you me?

I don't think you should go back right now. You haven't given any suggestion that you found a new career that you're passionate about, sounds to me like you're just going back because "it's the thing to do". I'm gonna get a lot of hate but a history degree is a waste of time career wise. You would probably get further in your career if you just did an apprenticeship or something. If you had said that you wanted to be an engineer or doctor or architect then I'd say yeah go back but sounds to me that you're just going back because you a) like history and b) you feel like you should be at university.
I'm not going back to do History. I'm going back to do screenwriting because I want to be a screenwriter. So no, I'm not going for any high end career here, or just because I feel like I should be at uni. I know better than anyone that I don't have to go to university. I want to go because I for the first time in my life know what I want to do and to do it I have to learn exactly how. Also, education has always been important to me. I am actually well enough to make a decision about this. There would be no point in me doing an apprenticeship for several reasons: 1) I don't want to be stuck doing crappy retail jobs for the rest of my life, and 2) most places won't have me anyway because I am over the age of 19. 3) You get basically no money for it which has no forseeable award at the end, unlike university. Apprenticeships you can do and then at the end they dump you out and you're back at square one, at the bottom rung of the career ladder, earning minimum wage or a bit more if you're lucky. I'm currently earning more than that now and I work in a stationary shop with no apprenticeship to my name.
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(Original post by geebeeiii)
I'm not going back to do History. I'm going back to do screenwriting because I want to be a screenwriter.
Straight from Wikipedia:
"No education is required to become a professional screenwriter, just good storytelling abilities and imagination"
(Original post by geebeeiii)
1) I don't want to be stuck doing crappy retail jobs for the rest of my life, and 2) most places won't have me anyway because I am over the age of 19. 3) You get basically no money for it which has no forseeable award at the end, unlike university. Apprenticeships you can do and then at the end they dump you out and you're back at square one, at the bottom rung of the career ladder, earning minimum wage or a bit more if you're lucky. I'm currently earning more than that now and I work in a stationary shop with no apprenticeship to my name.
Apprenticeships aren't all retail
The limit is generally 24 and even so a lot of apprenticship schemes take any ages.
Yes to start off with pay is crap but then you move up.
As part of your contract you work towards a pre-agreed qualification. University is the one with no guaranteed reward, you can go but there is no guarantee anyone will hire you.
There are dodgy apprenticeships out there but most are reputable and would keep you on.

Sounds to me like you're as brainwashed as I was at your age. "university is the only way" "if you're not at university you're wasting time" "apprenticeships are for dummies" etc. After dropping out I actually did my research and in large companies their apprenticeship schemes are pretty much identical to their graduate schemes, the graduate scheme is simply fast track at a cost of £27,000.
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geebeeiii
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(Original post by WGR)
Straight from Wikipedia:
"No education is required to become a professional screenwriter, just good storytelling abilities and imagination"

Apprenticeships aren't all retail
The limit is generally 24 and even so a lot of apprenticship schemes take any ages.
Yes to start off with pay is crap but then you move up.
As part of your contract you work towards a pre-agreed qualification. University is the one with no guaranteed reward, you can go but there is no guarantee anyone will hire you.
There are dodgy apprenticeships out there but most are reputable and would keep you on.

Sounds to me like you're as brainwashed as I was at your age. "university is the only way" "if you're not at university you're wasting time" "apprenticeships are for dummies" etc. After dropping out I actually did my research and in large companies their apprenticeship schemes are pretty much identical to their graduate schemes, the graduate scheme is simply fast track at a cost of £27,000.
Look I appreciate your help but I have made my mind up about going to uni. I am not 'brainwashed' at all. I have 2 years of actual work under my belt now. I know what's what. I also know an apprenticeship is not for me. I have never written a script in my life. Where am I going to learn to do so? I don't know, if only there was some sort of educational institute where they teach you these things?!

This thread was supposed to be about advice in terms of returning as a mature student in different circumstances than just a pre-undergraduate who doesn't know what they're doing. Please appreciate that I am almost 20 years old now. No it's still not 'old', but I have had time to think about my passions and my career. If I had wanted to do an apprenticeship I would already be doing one.
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WGR
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(Original post by geebeeiii)
Look I appreciate your help but I have made my mind up about going to uni. I am not 'brainwashed' at all. I have 2 years of actual work under my belt now. I know what's what. I also know an apprenticeship is not for me. I have never written a script in my life. Where am I going to learn to do so? I don't know, if only there was some sort of educational institute where they teach you these things?!

This thread was supposed to be about advice in terms of returning as a mature student in different circumstances than just a pre-undergraduate who doesn't know what they're doing. Please appreciate that I am almost 20 years old now. No it's still not 'old', but I have had time to think about my passions and my career. If I had wanted to do an apprenticeship I would already be doing one.
Nowhere is going to teach you how to be creative which is all that matters in screenwriting. Trust me you will just end up in office middle management if you're lucky, Starbucks if you're not.

I have given you alternatives and you're just shouting me down. All I'm saying is try some other paths first before jumping back into a place you didn't enjoy at a cost of £27,000. I dropped out of two universities before I had the courage to say that I wanted to take a different path, I don't want you to make that same mistake.
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Katy100
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(Original post by HugoDuchovny)
Seriously, what is with the current generation of utter weaklings.

Anxiety, Depression, Social Nervousness

There are kids in war torn poor countries desperate for a chance at education, some have to walk a ridiculous number of miles to school, others have to work all night to be able to go to school/university in the morning.

And here in the UK, a country with one of the world's best education systems, with the government GIVING MONEY for education, I here of so many dropout/failure cases due to "anxiety, depression, etc".

Unless a family member died, or a traumatic experience occurred or something genuinely serious, most of these individuals are just goddamn lazy fools.

Anxiety and depression are two of the most overdiagnosed medical conditions. Most people have anxiety and depression, it's a part of life. The sensible majority just get over it, get their sh*t together and get sh*t done.
What psychiatric or psychological training have you had that makes you feel able to comment on mental health conditions?

I have profound obsessive compulsive disorder (an anxiety disorder) and have spent over 3 months in a psychiatric hospital. As a result of my disorder I could not dress myself, eat, shower, talk to other people.

Anxiety disorders and depression are neuropsychiatric illnesses and there are real functional and sometimes structural differences in the brains of sufferers.

Occasionally feeling stressed or down is very different to suffering from debilitating anxiety or life-destroying depression.

Re- think
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geebeeiii
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(Original post by Katy100)
What psychiatric or psychological training have you had that makes you feel able to comment on mental health conditions?

I have profound obsessive compulsive disorder (an anxiety disorder) and have spent over 3 months in a psychiatric hospital. As a result of my disorder I could not dress myself, eat, shower, talk to other people.

Anxiety disorders and depression are neuropsychiatric illnesses and there are real functional and sometimes structural differences in the brains of sufferers.

Occasionally feeling stressed or down is very different to suffering from debilitating anxiety or life-destroying depression.

Re- think
Thank you for this Katy. I'm glad you're in recovery and I'm also thankful for you coming out and saying this.
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Legendary-A-Sonic
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(Original post by geebeeiii)
Hi everyone

Now just to launch into my situation:

I originally went to university starting in september 2012, 18 years old, first time away from home etc doing a History BA. However, I dropped out of uni after a term and a bit because I was really really ill with depression and anxiety to the point where I was very agoraphobic and couldn't function safely so I went home. Since then I've been recovering and doing 'normal' jobs, mainly in retail whilst spending a lot of time figuring what to do.

You see the thing is, I chose History the first time because I got an A in my A-Level and I found it interesting and was good at it. However, I wasn't interested in any of the career paths afterwards and just did it because I felt like I had to go to uni to prove something to other people. I realise now what a stupid system that was for me. I tried to reapply last year as in to start last September but I ended up abandoning it because I still didn't know what to do and was still sort of ill.

Anyway, I decided that I wanted to go back as a mature student because given that I barely got on with 18 year olds when I was 18 myself I didn't want to end up in with them too much again. I mean, when I was there the first time all my friends plus my boyfriend were mature students. Besides, I also am not particularly interested in reliving freshers. Not that I don't want to go out etc but going out and getting drunk 3 or 4 times a week is not a part of my life anymore. So I decided to wait until this coming autumn when UCAS reopens to reapply to go the following year. By then I will be 21 which is young for a 'mature' student but honestly I think I've earned the title given what I've gone through. Also, for the first time in my life I know what I want to do and I can't wait to start doing it. I'm going to be applying for screenwriting courses, fyi.

Anyway, it would just be nice to know that there are other mature students out there with a similar outlook (wanting to socialise without 24/7 clubbing) who are passionate about their chosen subjects. Also that there is an actual community on here to ask questions because I am so confused by the application process. I think I can still get a reference from my old college tutor for sure, but will I need relevant experience to back it up having been out of education for almost 3 years by that point? Will universities accept submissions of examples of my writing to this end? Also I'm still paying back student finance for THEIR mistake of an overpayment which they didn't inform me of til long after I left uni which has made me a little worried about reapplying for a loan, though I should be done paying them by around November this year.

And did anyone else drop out or have a similar bad experience of education before who is a bit apprehensive of a return?
Oh, hello, long lost twin.

I'm currently in a very similar situation to you, although I only just dropped out after 2 years of a 4 year degree, and am now looking to reapply in September. I've also had quite bad problems with depression and an eating disorder at university, but I'm in therapy and my anti-depressants are really beginning to stabilize my mood, so things are much improved and I'm looking forward to starting again.

That being said, I'm a little concerned about being surrounded by wee ones (dear god dear lord, I am dreading freshers week, clubbing is just NOT for me), but people on TSR who've responded to me have only reassured me that there is a place for us 'old' 21 year old freshers in the community Remember, there's also a strong graduate community at many unis too, who are probably closer to us in age.

I'm not sure if this is any help, but here is the UCAS page for mature students: http://www.ucas.com/how-it-all-works/mature-students

I'd recommend that for individual universities, if you can ring up the department you're interested in or the admissions office (although they don't always know the ins and outs, so you'd probably also be best off emailing the specific department if you don't have a number for them) and ask them about your reference, personal statement, writing stuff etc... Perhaps you could also look at local college/access to education courses for creative writing (not exactly screenwriting, but probably close enough) and discuss with your chosen universities if a teacher from a course like that could provide you with a more recent reference? I'd reckon your old college tutor would be fine also I think I've also heard that some job references can suffice too.

Just wanted to add that I absolutely know what you're going through, and if you ever want to PM me for advice, UCAS help, or anything like that in the future, please do! I don't know anyone else applying this year who is my age, so it would be great to have a fellow mature student to talk to during the application process I'm doing English, by the way, so I reckon our interests are quite similar.

Really awesome that you haven't given up in what you want to achieve. We can do it! (apologies for my slightly nerdy overzealous reply... today has been an unusually good day for me, and it's always nice to know you're not alone )

Have you thought of anywhere you want to apply to yet?
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geebeeiii
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(Original post by Legendary-A-Sonic)
Oh, hello, long lost twin.

I'm currently in a very similar situation to you, although I only just dropped out after 2 years of a 4 year degree, and am now looking to reapply in September. I've also had quite bad problems with depression and an eating disorder at university, but I'm in therapy and my anti-depressants are really beginning to stabilize my mood, so things are much improved and I'm looking forward to starting again.

That being said, I'm a little concerned about being surrounded by wee ones (dear god dear lord, I am dreading freshers week, clubbing is just NOT for me), but people on TSR who've responded to me have only reassured me that there is a place for us 'old' 21 year old freshers in the community Remember, there's also a strong graduate community at many unis too, who are probably closer to us in age.

I'm not sure if this is any help, but here is the UCAS page for mature students: http://www.ucas.com/how-it-all-works/mature-students

I'd recommend that for individual universities, if you can ring up the department you're interested in or the admissions office (although they don't always know the ins and outs, so you'd probably also be best off emailing the specific department if you don't have a number for them) and ask them about your reference, personal statement, writing stuff etc... Perhaps you could also look at local college/access to education courses for creative writing (not exactly screenwriting, but probably close enough) and discuss with your chosen universities if a teacher from a course like that could provide you with a more recent reference? I'd reckon your old college tutor would be fine also I think I've also heard that some job references can suffice too.

Just wanted to add that I absolutely know what you're going through, and if you ever want to PM me for advice, UCAS help, or anything like that in the future, please do! I don't know anyone else applying this year who is my age, so it would be great to have a fellow mature student to talk to during the application process I'm doing English, by the way, so I reckon our interests are quite similar.

Really awesome that you haven't given up in what you want to achieve. We can do it! (apologies for my slightly nerdy overzealous reply... today has been an unusually good day for me, and it's always nice to know you're not alone )

Have you thought of anywhere you want to apply to yet?
Wow it's so good to know that someone else is in the same situation as me! Well there's been a few of you now but given we're the same age with similar problems you're the closest so far! I will PM you, like right away, I feel there is much to be discussed haha!
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linnyloo87
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Fellow drop out here so nice to hear of someone else who has been in a similar experience I dropped out of a nursing course because of mental health problems. Hoping to do an access course in September and then Uni in 2015. I must admit I'm nervous about explaining why I dropped out of my last course.


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geebeeiii
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(Original post by linnyloo87)
Fellow drop out here so nice to hear of someone else who has been in a similar experience I dropped out of a nursing course because of mental health problems. Hoping to do an access course in September and then Uni in 2015. I must admit I'm nervous about explaining why I dropped out of my last course.


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It's starting to surprise me how many others there are who dropped out because of mental health problems. It's very reassuring for all of us I think I wanted to do nursing originally but I couldn't afford the access course and in the end I don't think it's really for me. Honestly I would tell the truth of why you dropped out- because of your health. It's important this taboo gets broken, and also it's nothing to be ashamed of. Now you are presumably in a better place to make a commitment to a course because you have life experience to tell you when you're ready to make a big decision like returning to university
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TheEssence
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#20
(Original post by HugoDuchovny)
Seriously, what is with the current generation of utter weaklings.

Anxiety, Depression, Social Nervousness

There are kids in war torn poor countries desperate for a chance at education, some have to walk a ridiculous number of miles to school, others have to work all night to be able to go to school/university in the morning.

And here in the UK, a country with one of the world's best education systems, with the government GIVING MONEY for education, I here of so many dropout/failure cases due to "anxiety, depression, etc".

Unless a family member died, or a traumatic experience occurred or something genuinely serious, most of these individuals are just goddamn lazy fools.

Anxiety and depression are two of the most overdiagnosed medical conditions. Most people have anxiety and depression, it's a part of life. The sensible majority just get over it, get their sh*t together and get sh*t done.
I agree, anxiety and depression definitely do exist as legitimate conditions, but they are heavily over-diagnosed. Allow people to hide minor inadequacies in confidence and personality behind the condition. OP may genuinely have a condition though.
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