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    Dear all,

    How are you there?

    I would like to share latest news with you all. Recently I have got two offers from Glasgow and Birmingham universities for a Master degree in Civil Engineering.

    Indeed the modules in both courses are almost similar. So I would appreciate if you can help me to make my final decision.

    another point:
    what does this sentence mean (modules are delivered in intensive week-long blocks) ???

    Best Regards
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    If the courses are pretty much the same then you only need to consider what else you want to get out of your year of study. So look at the cities, the societies at the unis, accommodation choices, cost of the course, cost of living, league table results for the unis or departments, night life etc and decide from there.

    Regarding the last point I wouldn't know for sure but my guess is that rather than spreading each module out over an entire term (usually you do a set amount of modules, taught for a few hours each week, meaning you're doing a few modules at the same time) you actually do one module per week, so your focus is only on one module at a time.
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    The week long blocks bit is because the course will probably be designed to fit around full time jobs - so its something like two intensive week long teaching blocks per term (or whatever) instead of classes etc on odd days each week. Phone the Dept and ask for clarification.
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    Thank you.

    But I think it is our right that the university should classify between full and part time. It is injustice to take whole course through two or three weeks only.

    What do you think?
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    I think you're misunderstanding it and should contact the department for clarification. There's obviously a good reason they do it this way.
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    I see.

    Thank you.
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    (Original post by hoohal)
    Thank you.

    But I think it is our right that the university should classify between full and part time. It is injustice to take whole course through two or three weeks only.

    What do you think?
    For any Masters course, you have to complete 180 credits. Whether the taught units are spread out over two terms or taken as 2-3 weeks of intensive teaching per term, the content and academic value will be the same. There's no injustice.

    My Masters involved 6 hours of teaching/lectures/seminars per week, spread over a term. This taught content could easily have been delivered in 5, 6 hour days over a fortnight.

    In any case, a Masters will be largely rooted in independent study, with teaching and lectures forming a much smaller proportion of the workload than at undergrad. A concentrated teaching structure allows you several weeks to concentrate on your independent study and coursework.

    If you don't like the way one if the courses is structured, that will help you make the decision.
 
 
 

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