Anyone forgotten how to speak their native language? Watch

Anonymous #1
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Hello. Are there any people who came to live in the UK and lost their ability to converse fluently in their mother tongue?

I've been here for a decade and over the years, I gradually lost my ability to speak fluently in my original language. I haven't forgotten it completely. But it's impossible to speak in anything other than really short, horribly fragmented sentences with a weird accent, abnormal pronunciation etc. It's really embarrassing not to be able to communicate effectively with my family, and I'm very ashamed at myself.

The weird thing is, a decade ago, I couldn't speak or write in English at all, while being perfectly fluent in my native language, it was first rate. Now, my spoken and written English are to a very high standard, but at the expense of my native language.

Anyone had a similar experience?
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RHyoudon'kno
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hello. Are there any people who came to live in the UK and lost their ability to converse fluently in their mother tongue?

I've been here for a decade and over the years, I gradually lost my ability to speak fluently in my original language. I haven't forgotten it completely. But it's impossible to speak in anything other than really short, horribly fragmented sentences with a weird accent, abnormal pronunciation etc. It's really embarrassing not to be able to communicate effectively with my family, and I'm very ashamed at myself.

The weird thing is, a decade ago, I couldn't speak or write in English at all, while being perfectly fluent in my native language, it was first rate. Now, my spoken and written English are to a very high standard, but at the expense of my native language.

Anyone had a similar experience?
I can't speak my language very well. I used to be fluent when I was younger but now I've forgotten. I talk to my mum most of the time. I don't talk to my dad very much and he can't speak english that well so I don't try to talk to him. I can only swear in my language. LOL.
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The_Internet
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I've forgotten most of my "native" language. I can understand it. I just can't really speak it all that well

So a lot of questions are answered with

"Jee" (yes)
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shopoholic
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(Original post by de_monies)
I've forgotten most of my "native" language. I can understand it. I just can't really speak it all that well

So a lot of questions are answered with

"Jee" (yes)
:lol: the other person must get really frustrated with so many jee's
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The_Internet
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(Original post by shopoholic)
:lol: the other person must get really frustrated with so many jee's
I try to say other stuff - half the time some of the older people talk to me in Engrish (on purpose typo), but the really old people, I don't like talking to so much, because I dont have any thing to say
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TheDaylighter
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Im the same, except I learnt both English and Dutch and then forgot how to speak Ducth when we moved to england

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German123
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hello. Are there any people who came to live in the UK and lost their ability to converse fluently in their mother tongue?

I've been here for a decade and over the years, I gradually lost my ability to speak fluently in my original language. I haven't forgotten it completely. But it's impossible to speak in anything other than really short, horribly fragmented sentences with a weird accent, abnormal pronunciation etc. It's really embarrassing not to be able to communicate effectively with my family, and I'm very ashamed at myself.

The weird thing is, a decade ago, I couldn't speak or write in English at all, while being perfectly fluent in my native language, it was first rate. Now, my spoken and written English are to a very high standard, but at the expense of my native language.

Anyone had a similar experience?
well i think learning english here is polutting my native language(polish)
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HiBear
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Depends what age you came to the UK. As a kid yeah if your parents didn't enforce learning of your mother tongue then your brain pretty much writes over it.

My parents enforced my mother tongue and everything so I'm not fluent in the sense that I can't speak it like a 20+ year old would but I can speak how a 15 year old can. (NB I left when I was 7)
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Octohedral
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Wow, I didn't know this was possible. Could you try regularly reading books / listening to MP3s in your native language if you want to keep it going for the sake of your family?
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emy-n
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I'm proud that even though I've lived here ten years my mother still makes me go to saturday school where I have lessons in my native language
and I have friends there with which I speak in our language

I think when many people come over here they get so caught up with fitting in that they forget what they originally had...
It's really such a shame.
I'm never going to forget where I come from and my language...
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donutaud15
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I speak my language fluently but sometimes I struggle to remember certain terms.

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Of_the_hook
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(Original post by donutaud15)
I speak my language fluently but sometimes I struggle to remember certain terms.

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Yeah this probably applies to me.


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Kaykee93
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I was born in France, then moved to the UK when I was 3. I was fluent in both French and English when I moved, but as I'd moved to Wales and joined a welsh school, I had to learn to speak it. Somewhere along the way, I lost all the French, and only got a C in my GCSE. I've now forgotten all the Welsh too!

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junior.doctor
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I've now been living in rural Africa for 3 years. My native language is English, I also speak near-fluent French (the European language of my current country), and day to day I speak two African languages interchangeably - not fluently, but reasonable. I have now got into a really bad habit of speaking 3-4 languages all mixed up and adding words in here and there in different languages. And actually, some words just don't even exist properly in certain languages ad aren't directly translatable so it's easier to use a different language. To the point where even if I'm speaking English, I often can't think of the English word but the French word or the dialect word comes to me much more easily. But the people I currently live around, understand this, so I CAN mix and match languages. I had real problems when I went back to the UK recently and could only speak English.
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