It'sTriggy
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I am a woman hence the title from Scotland and I was wondering whether chemical engineering is the right career path for me?

I highly enjoy my maths, physics and chemistry and I know that Chemical Engineering contains a lot of these. However I have heard that chemical engineering can be dangerous for women, especially of child bearing age.

Do all chemical engineering careers involve working at a power plant around harmful toxins or is there other aspects that are less health threatening but just as well paid?

thanks
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jamez870
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There's a wide range of industries you can end up in here's a couple of good websites:

http://www.icheme.org/
http://www.whynotchemeng.com
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Nymthae
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One thing to remember is large companies have very thorough health and safety procedures. You are actively encouraged to report anything that seems unsafe, or if you feel there is a task you cannot do without endangering yourself. It's the number one aspect in the industry, and a complete mindset. People look after each other, they will tell you if they think you should be doing it under extraction, or with X equipment instead etc. Nobody wants to see people get hurt. Occasionally it does happen, but so do traffic accidents - all for the same reasons: someone got complacent, somebody didn't follow procedure etc. Usually though lots of precautions are taken to try and reduce the chance of injury even if something does go wrong.

I wouldn't let it put you off the field, if you're interested in it. There are lots of roles available in supply chain roles, which can be more office based and organisational rather than shop floor. Technical sales positions tend to come with quite attractive packages.
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Smack
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(Original post by It'sTriggy)
I am a woman hence the title from Scotland and I was wondering whether chemical engineering is the right career path for me?

I highly enjoy my maths, physics and chemistry and I know that Chemical Engineering contains a lot of these. However I have heard that chemical engineering can be dangerous for women, especially of child bearing age.

Do all chemical engineering careers involve working at a power plant around harmful toxins or is there other aspects that are less health threatening but just as well paid?

thanks
Not sure where you have heard that from. In reality you're very likely to be desk based like almost every other type of engineer.
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ihavemooedtoday
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Yeah most of engineering is really just getting paid a lot of money typing on computers. Like secretary, but much more interesting work .

I am an electrical engineer and I spend 98% of the time at my desk typing. I have never once been zapped.

Civil engineers also don't build bridges themselves.

I'd imagine it's the same for chemical engineers.

And yeah like Nymthae said, industries nowadays are much more safety-conscious than back in the days (by regulation if not voluntary).
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kuroineko567
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I am also female and planning to go down the chemical or aerospace engineering route. Does anyone know if there are lots of opportunities abroad (mainly Japan or USA) for chemical/aerospace engineers? Thanks x
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ihavemooedtoday
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(Original post by kuroineko567)
I am also female and planning to go down the chemical or aerospace engineering route. Does anyone know if there are lots of opportunities abroad (mainly Japan or USA) for chemical/aerospace engineers? Thanks x
USA has tons of aerospace engineering jobs/companies. Lockheed Martin and Boeing for a start, and also small aircraft manufacturers like Cessna, Piper, Beechcraft, Cirrus, etc. The list goes on and on and on and on.

No idea about chemical.
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kuroineko567
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thanks x
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Basilla
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(Original post by kuroineko567)
thanks x
As far as I am aware, barring nuclear engineering (which is very accessible via chemical engineering anyway), chemical engineering is the highest paid engineering field. Once you get chartered and have some experience, the average salary rivals that of doctors.
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drake66
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(Original post by Basilla)
As far as I am aware, barring nuclear engineering (which is very accessible via chemical engineering anyway), chemical engineering is the highest paid engineering field. Once you get chartered and have some experience, the average salary rivals that of doctors.
So i am currently doing a levels and i am in search for a course. i looked at biochemical engineering and i liked the idea of it, bearing in mind i already do biology as an a level i think this would help me. Could someone please an insight to this course including how many years the whole course at uni is and the starting salary for a worker in this field as well as the average salary
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ihavemooedtoday
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Most engineering disciplines are well paid (at least civil, electrical, computer, chemical, mechanical), so I wouldn't worry about pay too much.

Most engineers are also paid proportional to their skill level, which is relatively uncommon (many jobs pay more or less the same regardless of how skilled you are, and you just don't get a job if you are not skilled enough).

Just pick something you are passionate about. You'll be good at it, and end up making more than what you would make doing something else, while being happy with your life.

I don't know about starting salary in the UK, but here (North America), starting for biochem is about equivalent of £40k.
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