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Linnende
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Hi. Does anyone else feel discouraged from training to be a teacher because they know teachers who are actively trying to discourage them from training? I'm about to start a PGCE (early years) in September and I'm really looking forward to it. I've always wanted to be a teacher and work with young kids especially so for me this is my dream job.

However, I'm NOT stupid. I know it's going to be tough, but I'm starting to get annoyed at the number of teachers around me who are acting like it's the worst job in the world and that I'm crazy for wanting to do it. I guess what I'm trying to say is are they right? The thing is as well as this being what I want to do it's also really the only thing I can do. Since my degree I've flitted from one job to another and tried various things out to see if I liked them, but I didn't, and since working in a school I've realised that teaching is the job for me. My point is, should I just not listen to these people? I am starting to think that there is a sizeable proportion of teachers who do just moan about everything and are always so negative and don't realise how lucky they are. I mean, I'm from a deprived working class background and no one else in my family even did a-levels let alone went to university so to me this is a big thing. I think they also like being miserable too because they don't even do anything to try and make their situation any better, just moan about it! :/

Sorry for the long rant!

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Georgie_M
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(Original post by Linnende)
Hi. Does anyone else feel discouraged from training to be a teacher because they know teachers who are actively trying to discourage them from training? I'm about to start a PGCE (early years) in September and I'm really looking forward to it. I've always wanted to be a teacher and work with young kids especially so for me this is my dream job.

However, I'm NOT stupid. I know it's going to be tough, but I'm starting to get annoyed at the number of teachers around me who are acting like it's the worst job in the world and that I'm crazy for wanting to do it. I guess what I'm trying to say is are they right? The thing is as well as this being what I want to do it's also really the only thing I can do. Since my degree I've flitted from one job to another and tried various things out to see if I liked them, but I didn't, and since working in a school I've realised that teaching is the job for me. My point is, should I just not listen to these people? I am starting to think that there is a sizeable proportion of teachers who do just moan about everything and are always so negative and don't realise how lucky they are. I mean, I'm from a deprived working class background and no one else in my family even did a-levels let alone went to university so to me this is a big thing. I think they also like being miserable too because they don't even do anything to try and make their situation any better, just moan about it! :/

Sorry for the long rant!

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Woah. Well for a start yes you should try it you don't gain anything from not trying. However these teachers aren't just being negative nancies for no reason, the average burn-out time for teachers is 5yrs, the drop-out rate from PGCE is massively high. What does this indicate? A very stressful, difficult jobs which is underplayed and largely under appreciated. You are getting in to it for the right reasons though and that's a plus and some people genuinely love it but it is very difficult. You will often be expected to work 12hr days plus work during the weekends, while constantly having to maintain targets etc. I am sure there is a lot more to it than that, I'm not a teacher btw but even I can see it is a very hard profession. Not trying to put you off btw but the teachers who are warning you are doing so probably out of concern, you need to know what you are getting in to and it doesn't sound like you do,
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Linnende
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I know exactly what I'm getting into. I'm aware that many teachers work 60-80 hour weeks and work through the weekend and in the evenings all while getting grief from the government, the media and everyone else who thinks that you're lazy and don't know how to do your job, as well as your working conditions being changed all the time to suit whatever government is in power and having to deal with a lot of bureaucracy, paperwork, ofsted inspections etc. I guess my point was it annoys me the way it's just assumed that I don't know what I'm getting myself into and that I'm not intelligent enough to make my own choices. And you have made the same assumption by saying at the end of your post that it doesn't sound like I know what I'm getting into. I've spent over a year working in schools, working with teachers in all of the primary age ranges and I do know what it's going to be like.
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uberteknik
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If you work for a corporation you have the pressure of performance targets and deadlines set by the business and your bosses. You do what you have to or you end up getting sacked.

Now transfer that into the classroom, same pressure to perform but this time do it while:

the goalposts are constantly shifting because the latest minister for education or chief of ofsted has a hair-brained half baked scheme they are going to ram through at all costs.
the tabloid media and gullible public lambasts the entire profession as being constanty moaning, lazy, unqualified, liberal tree-hugging do-gooders and real-world failures who get 3 months+ holiday a year and only work from 9am to 3pm plus duvet (I mean inset) days for good measure.
30+ students with raging hormones who don't want to be there and the nasty ones who will do their utmost to disrupt your class for fun and to constantly provoke you.
thankless parents who use you as a glorified childminder/marriage guidance counsellor/child psychologist/general kicking bag.
having to buy books, materiels, learning aids etc. out of your own money because the headteacher won't give you a budget for it.

The drop out rate for NQT's is so high because all of the dreams and expectations evaporate in the first few months when you realise what you have let yourself in for.

Nice work if you can get it.
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uberteknik
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(Original post by Linnende)
I know exactly what I'm getting into. I'm aware that many teachers work 60-80 hour weeks and work through the weekend and in the evenings all while getting grief from the government, the media and everyone else who thinks that you're lazy and don't know how to do your job, as well as your working conditions being changed all the time to suit whatever government is in power and having to deal with a lot of bureaucracy, paperwork, ofsted inspections etc. I guess my point was it annoys me the way it's just assumed that I don't know what I'm getting myself into and that I'm not intelligent enough to make my own choices. And you have made the same assumption by saying at the end of your post that it doesn't sound like I know what I'm getting into. I've spent over a year working in schools, working with teachers in all of the primary age ranges and I do know what it's going to be like.
So really all you want is for people to agree with you? Why are you asking if you already know? All you have to do is ignore the comments. Simples.

Oh- wait. It gets your goat. Quite ironic. You already have the moaning skills needed for the job!
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Jantaculum
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Firstly, well done for preparing yourself - a year's experience in a school has clearly given you a good understanding (and I get that you're not ranting, just listing the negatives that you've heard about)

As one of those 'moaning teachers' I would say that people of my age, who've been in the job a long time, have seen big changes so that teaching is no longer the job they signed up for. If the changes were of benefit to the pupils, I don't think you would get so much moaning, but the fact (imo) is that the extra workload placed on teachers hasn't raised the standards of education (not to say that standards haven't risen, there are other reasons not linked to politicians)

It does get to you year after year, having to introduce a 'new' initiative that you've tried before, you know it won't work, and when it doesn't you'll get the blame (the current reliance on phonics as the only way to teach reading is my current dislike, any KS1 teacher who knows their stuff understands that children have a variety of ways towards reading and that no one method will work for every child)

This is turning into a rant now! I recently left teaching after 25 years but can see there's a good cohort of young and enthusiastic teachers coming through (lots of reflective people on TSR). All the best OP



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Linnende
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Thanks. I understand what you're saying, but it does get annoying having people say to you things like "if you want to do that then you can forget having a life. If you want to sacrifice your social life, relationship, children etc. then go for it!". I'm just like yeah... get some perspective! :/
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Linnende
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(Original post by uberteknik)
So really all you want is for people to agree with you? Why are you asking if you already know? All you have to do is ignore the comments. Simples.

Oh- wait. It gets your goat. Quite ironic. You already have the moaning skills needed for the job!
Thanks a lot for that insightful post...
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Broadhallian
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(Original post by Linnende)
Thanks. I understand what you're saying, but it does get annoying having people say to you things like "if you want to do that then you can forget having a life. If you want to sacrifice your social life, relationship, children etc. then go for it!". I'm just like yeah... get some perspective! :/
Yeah, you will not have much of a social life for the next 2 years, that much is true.

I ended up giving up playing football as I didn't have the time to train and was bogged down with work on Saturdays/Sundays.

4 weeks left and counting!!!

However you won't know what it's like until you try for yourself. But as an accountant training to be a teacher said to me in one school;

"They all said it'll be hard work and I'm like yeah yeah yeah every job says that, how much more can it be that an accountant, but jesus christ, I didn't think it would be this much!!!"

I laughed when he said that.

It is hard work, there is a difference though in being aware of it and going through it. You won't know until you try it though if it is worth it for you. I've found out that for me it is not worth it and I can't wait to finish the PGCE to say goodbye to the classroom. I'm tired on a 50% teaching timetable, the thought of going up to 80% and then 90% makes me dizzy.

Basically, when the working day is done, I want to watch the Champions League and not feel guilty that I'm not doing some work, or go to the pub on a Saturday night and not worry about having too many pints because I have to do work the following day.
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myblueheaven339
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(Original post by Linnende)
I know exactly what I'm getting into. I'm aware that many teachers work 60-80 hour weeks and work through the weekend and in the evenings all while getting grief from the government, the media and everyone else who thinks that you're lazy and don't know how to do your job, as well as your working conditions being changed all the time to suit whatever government is in power and having to deal with a lot of bureaucracy, paperwork, ofsted inspections etc. I guess my point was it annoys me the way it's just assumed that I don't know what I'm getting myself into and that I'm not intelligent enough to make my own choices. And you have made the same assumption by saying at the end of your post that it doesn't sound like I know what I'm getting into. I've spent over a year working in schools, working with teachers in all of the primary age ranges and I do know what it's going to be like.
I worked in schools before my training and I still had absolutely no idea what they reality of teaching would be like.


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redferry
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Teaching, through people I know, does not appear to be any worse than many other jobs, but its not your standard 9-5 that's for sure. Its kind of like academia but without the reputation that comes with it and no one you teach actually wants to learn. On the plus side long holidays. One friend of mine did her PGCE, taught for a year then quit to do a masters. On the other hand I come from a family of child social workers and would take teaching over that any day of the week.
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VickyGosby
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The teachers I have met were all quite the opposite! Although they did also all say the first two years are absolutely manic. I am similarly a bit worried having seen quite a lot of posts about how difficult it is, but as seems to be the general theme of this thread: you don't know until you try! Good luck OP!
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Chewyy
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(Original post by redferry)
Teaching, through people I know, does not appear to be any worse than many other jobs, but its not your standard 9-5 that's for sure. Its kind of like academia but without the reputation that comes with it and no one you teach actually wants to learn. On the plus side long holidays. One friend of mine did her PGCE, taught for a year then quit to do a masters. On the other hand I come from a family of child social workers and would take teaching over that any day of the week.
How is it in any way like academia? Only a small part of an academic's life is taken up with teaching, and in a completely different environment and approach than secondary/primary teaching, with different aims.
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redferry
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(Original post by Chewyy)
How is it in any way like academia? Only a small part of an academic's life is taken up with teaching, and in a completely different environment and approach than secondary/primary teaching, with different aims.
I meant in the respect it takes over your whole life.

Jeez.
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flapjack91
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I'm currently working with NQTs and my sister in law is also a teacher. They've all said how the first two years are the most difficult as they will be the years where you learn the most along with being observed quite a lot.

However, as tough as each day is, they seem to be very happy with their jobs and find it extremely rewarding.

I'm hoping to do my PGCE this year and as anxious as I am, I'm excited to start!
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Juichiro
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(Original post by Jantaculum)
Firstly, well done for preparing yourself - a year's experience in a school has clearly given you a good understanding (and I get that you're not ranting, just listing the negatives that you've heard about)

As one of those 'moaning teachers' I would say that people of my age, who've been in the job a long time, have seen big changes so that teaching is no longer the job they signed up for. If the changes were of benefit to the pupils, I don't think you would get so much moaning, but the fact (imo) is that the extra workload placed on teachers hasn't raised the standards of education (not to say that standards haven't risen, there are other reasons not linked to politicians)

It does get to you year after year, having to introduce a 'new' initiative that you've tried before, you know it won't work, and when it doesn't you'll get the blame (the current reliance on phonics as the only way to teach reading is my current dislike, any KS1 teacher who knows their stuff understands that children have a variety of ways towards reading and that no one method will work for every child)

This is turning into a rant now! I recently left teaching after 25 years but can see there's a good cohort of young and enthusiastic teachers coming through (lots of reflective people on TSR). All the best OP



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May I ask what job you currently you have?
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Linnende
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(Original post by VickyGosby)
The teachers I have met were all quite the opposite! Although they did also all say the first two years are absolutely manic. I am similarly a bit worried having seen quite a lot of posts about how difficult it is, but as seems to be the general theme of this thread: you don't know until you try! Good luck OP!
Thanks. Are you starting a PGCE this year too?
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Linnende
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(Original post by flapjack91)
I'm currently working with NQTs and my sister in law is also a teacher. They've all said how the first two years are the most difficult as they will be the years where you learn the most along with being observed quite a lot.

However, as tough as each day is, they seem to be very happy with their jobs and find it extremely rewarding.

I'm hoping to do my PGCE this year and as anxious as I am, I'm excited to start!
Cool. What age range/subject are you planning to teach?
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Jantaculum
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(Original post by Juichiro)
May I ask what job you currently you have?
Currently not working - I am treating myself to the luxury of going back to being a student
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Linnende
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(Original post by redferry)
Teaching, through people I know, does not appear to be any worse than many other jobs, but its not your standard 9-5 that's for sure. Its kind of like academia but without the reputation that comes with it and no one you teach actually wants to learn. On the plus side long holidays. One friend of mine did her PGCE, taught for a year then quit to do a masters. On the other hand I come from a family of child social workers and would take teaching over that any day of the week.
I think it depends what age range you teach. I'm going to be teaching lower primary and at that age they're generally very eager to learn and they like school.
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