Ronhaar
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I'm looking to do pharmaceutical science at uni next year (2015) and was wondering which uni's are the best for this or is it just down to personal preference and the course the uni provides?

I've been looking at Brighton and Hertfordshire so far.

Also, are there any other types of courses that would get me into a job in the pharmaceutical industry?
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cbooth5
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Hi, I would say you are right it does depend on personal preference and the course. If you are looking to do pharmaceutical science and nothing else I would say make sure your uni is in the respectable half as pharmaceutical companies are becoming increasingly selective - for my university (Liverpool JMU probably average / sligtly below average) I would need a first class degree / good relevant masters degree to get research type jobs or to get further education. If I got a 2:1 areas such as pharma quality control / assurance, analysis / analytical chemist, manufacture I could work but only because this is a big employment sector for graduates and many are required to assess batches of millions of drugs which will then be released. For more selective, maybe more exciting and competitive job types such as regulatory affairs, drug design or clinical trials then yes you would need a first / 2:1 and a masters degree or PhD and often pharmacologists / MSci chemists / chemists with PhDs and pharma experience gain these jobs. I can't comment on Brighton or Herts but they sound definitely academic enough to give you a career if you want to do well.

As for courses that will get you into the pharmaceutical industry there are many, chemistry, biomedical science, pharmacy (industrial pharmacist), pharmacologist, pharmaceutical science, pharmaceutical chemistry and maybe biochemistry some employ biologists but much less frequently employed. Pharmaceutical chemistry and pharmacology are often more competitive though as job roles are more selective so you have to be confident you can keep up with the crowd.. I am studying chemical and pharmaceutical science which gives me the backup of the chemical industry which is useful as I am passionate about both and plan to work in QC / QA and move up to a managing position in a pharma company if not chemical company someday : ) I think you have to judge your own ability probably in your case by UCAS points and there is certainly a little jump from not so good unis doing pharmaceutical science and chemistry (240-280) to a academic university doing chemistry, pharmacy and pharmacology (280-320). If you want a safe bet I would go for chemistry with a medium rated university to ensure you can get a 2:1 or if it interests you more pharmaceutical science, because how well you can do / further post-grad education limits job roles in pharma, although say an analyst (nothing exceptional) in a management position can be a good role regarding salary and management. If you want a more exciting job in pharma than an analyst / QC / QA then I would prepare to do a masters afterwards or chemistry / pharmacology as a degree.
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Ronhaar
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(Original post by cbooth5)
Hi, I would say you are right it does depend on personal preference and the course. If you are looking to do pharmaceutical science and nothing else I would say make sure your uni is in the respectable half as pharmaceutical companies are becoming increasingly selective - for my university (Liverpool JMU probably average / sligtly below average) I would need a first class degree / good relevant masters degree to get research type jobs or to get further education. If I got a 2:1 areas such as pharma quality control / assurance, analysis / analytical chemist, manufacture I could work but only because this is a big employment sector for graduates and many are required to assess batches of millions of drugs which will then be released. For more selective, maybe more exciting and competitive job types such as regulatory affairs, drug design or clinical trials then yes you would need a first / 2:1 and a masters degree or PhD and often pharmacologists / MSci chemists / chemists with PhDs and pharma experience gain these jobs. I can't comment on Brighton or Herts but they sound definitely academic enough to give you a career if you want to do well.

As for courses that will get you into the pharmaceutical industry there are many, chemistry, biomedical science, pharmacy (industrial pharmacist), pharmacologist, pharmaceutical science, pharmaceutical chemistry and maybe biochemistry some employ biologists but much less frequently employed. Pharmaceutical chemistry and pharmacology are often more competitive though as job roles are more selective so you have to be confident you can keep up with the crowd.. I am studying chemical and pharmaceutical science which gives me the backup of the chemical industry which is useful as I am passionate about both and plan to work in QC / QA and move up to a managing position in a pharma company if not chemical company someday : ) I think you have to judge your own ability probably in your case by UCAS points and there is certainly a little jump from not so good unis doing pharmaceutical science and chemistry (240-280) to a academic university doing chemistry, pharmacy and pharmacology (280-320). If you want a safe bet I would go for chemistry with a medium rated university to ensure you can get a 2:1 or if it interests you more pharmaceutical science, because how well you can do / further post-grad education limits job roles in pharma, although say an analyst (nothing exceptional) in a management position can be a good role regarding salary and management. If you want a more exciting job in pharma than an analyst / QC / QA then I would prepare to do a masters afterwards or chemistry / pharmacology as a degree.
Thanks for the great reply

Unfortunately, I am studying a btec level 3 extended diploma in applied science - not what I wanted to do but that's just how it turned out - and some of the average/above average universities are asking for A level chemistry (whether it be AS or A2) alongside the btec. I have one year left of sixth form so if I was to complete the A level chemistry i'd come out with a single AS grade. I am undecided on whether I should go for it or not - my chemistry teacher will probably make the decision for me, I presume. Would it be worth my while to do it or should I hedge my bets by not doing it?

I have emailed a few uni's such as:
Manc Met 'Pharmaceutical Chemistry' - who have told me that they will consider my application if I meet their requirements (without the A level chem).
LJMU 'Applied Chemical & Pharmaceutical Science' - Will also accept without the A Level chem.
As well as Hertfordshire 'Pharmaceutical Science' & Hull.

NTU 'Pharmaceutical & Medicinal Chem -
I have emailed but I would guess that they require the A level chem.

What would be the difference with 'Pharmaceutical Chemistry' and 'Pharmaceutical Science' - course-wise and career-wise ?? Which would open more doors?
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cbooth5
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(Original post by Ronhaar)
Thanks for the great reply

Unfortunately, I am studying a btec level 3 extended diploma in applied science - not what I wanted to do but that's just how it turned out - and some of the average/above average universities are asking for A level chemistry (whether it be AS or A2) alongside the btec. I have one year left of sixth form so if I was to complete the A level chemistry i'd come out with a single AS grade. I am undecided on whether I should go for it or not - my chemistry teacher will probably make the decision for me, I presume. Would it be worth my while to do it or should I hedge my bets by not doing it?

I have emailed a few uni's such as:
Manc Met 'Pharmaceutical Chemistry' - who have told me that they will consider my application if I meet their requirements (without the A level chem).
LJMU 'Applied Chemical & Pharmaceutical Science' - Will also accept without the A Level chem.
As well as Hertfordshire 'Pharmaceutical Science' & Hull.

NTU 'Pharmaceutical & Medicinal Chem -
I have emailed but I would guess that they require the A level chem.

What would be the difference with 'Pharmaceutical Chemistry' and 'Pharmaceutical Science' - course-wise and career-wise ?? Which would open more doors?

No problems at all : ) will help where I can. Its funny I have just finished my 2nd year of the course you mentioned - I'm doing Applied Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences at LJMU. The vast majority of my class did A levels ~45/60, but there were some btec science people when we started I remember so I can guarantee my uni would accept you if you got what they wanted - its also a collecting course for people who don't quite get into pharmacy. If you did get on the course there is also the option to transfer to pharmacy if you get >60% first year. That's all the advice I can really give as to whether to go for it or not, although I did find AS level hard and managed an ok grade but only from retakes in the second year of A levels to make up doing bad first time.

Pharmaceutical chemistry is more hardcore chemistry and medicinal chemistry I think, I studied one module of it first year. Basically drug synthesis and discovery, nearly always research jobs. It really helps if you have a natural aptitude at organic chemistry, synthesis, metabolism and that area to keep up with the crowd (I didn't!). They will probably do an overview to keep job opportunities open but it is competitive to be employed as a pharmaceutical chemist and often further education and good grades are needed to work for a pharma company. Pharmaceutical science is an overview of everything about pharma including a little drug design/medicinal chemistry(maybe a module) and if you get a 2:1 / first in this degree there is nothing stopping you from being a medicinal chemist afterwards from further education maybe but you would have to do well in the degree. Doing this keeps the doors more open to pretty ordinary jobs like quality control /assurance, formulation scientist, analyst etc. which you can still work in pharma / chemical industries as. Its really knowing your ability and strengths which one to go for.
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Ronhaar
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(Original post by cbooth5)
No problems at all : ) will help where I can. Its funny I have just finished my 2nd year of the course you mentioned - I'm doing Applied Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences at LJMU. The vast majority of my class did A levels ~45/60, but there were some btec science people when we started I remember so I can guarantee my uni would accept you if you got what they wanted - its also a collecting course for people who don't quite get into pharmacy. If you did get on the course there is also the option to transfer to pharmacy if you get >60% first year. That's all the advice I can really give as to whether to go for it or not, although I did find AS level hard and managed an ok grade but only from retakes in the second year of A levels to make up doing bad first time.

Pharmaceutical chemistry is more hardcore chemistry and medicinal chemistry I think, I studied one module of it first year. Basically drug synthesis and discovery, nearly always research jobs. It really helps if you have a natural aptitude at organic chemistry, synthesis, metabolism and that area to keep up with the crowd (I didn't!). They will probably do an overview to keep job opportunities open but it is competitive to be employed as a pharmaceutical chemist and often further education and good grades are needed to work for a pharma company. Pharmaceutical science is an overview of everything about pharma including a little drug design/medicinal chemistry(maybe a module) and if you get a 2:1 / first in this degree there is nothing stopping you from being a medicinal chemist afterwards from further education maybe but you would have to do well in the degree. Doing this keeps the doors more open to pretty ordinary jobs like quality control /assurance, formulation scientist, analyst etc. which you can still work in pharma / chemical industries as. Its really knowing your ability and strengths which one to go for.
So, I think I'm going to take at look at the following uni's and get some more information about the courses and career opportunities at open days.
NTU - Pharmaceutical & Medicinal Chemistry
Hertfordshire - Pharmaceutical Science
Manchester Met - Pharmaceutical Chemistry
LJMU - Applied Chemical & Pharmaceutical Science

What are the facilities like at LJMU?
How is the socialising? - I've heard the nightlife is decent from a few people
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cbooth5
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(Original post by Ronhaar)
So, I think I'm going to take at look at the following uni's and get some more information about the courses and career opportunities at open days.
NTU - Pharmaceutical & Medicinal Chemistry
Hertfordshire - Pharmaceutical Science
Manchester Met - Pharmaceutical Chemistry
LJMU - Applied Chemical & Pharmaceutical Science

What are the facilities like at LJMU?
How is the socialising? - I've heard the nightlife is decent from a few people

Nice that's what I did really beforehand. I think facilities are ok, mainly the free off peak gym membership (lifestyles) is free and useful if you're into that. There are many good societies (swimming, football, hockey etc.) which are sociable and friendly go out weekly if you need a kickstart for friends, that's all I can think of. There are two cafes / food stores in the byrom street campus where science courses are lectured and enough computer rooms, the only thing is the campus is a 15 / 10 minute walk from town. Socialising is pretty good, I highly recommend joining /trying at least 2 societies as freshers and the start of first year is incredible. Nightlife - good, Im originally from Nottingham and I think its a tiny bit better but I could be biased for that reason, the only place in your list which could be better for nightlife is maybe Manchester In my opinion (never been to Herts). Any more questions just fire away
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Ronhaar
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(Original post by cbooth5)
Nice that's what I did really beforehand. I think facilities are ok, mainly the free off peak gym membership (lifestyles) is free and useful if you're into that. There are many good societies (swimming, football, hockey etc.) which are sociable and friendly go out weekly if you need a kickstart for friends, that's all I can think of. There are two cafes / food stores in the byrom street campus where science courses are lectured and enough computer rooms, the only thing is the campus is a 15 / 10 minute walk from town. Socialising is pretty good, I highly recommend joining /trying at least 2 societies as freshers and the start of first year is incredible. Nightlife - good, Im originally from Nottingham and I think its a tiny bit better but I could be biased for that reason, the only place in your list which could be better for nightlife is maybe Manchester In my opinion (never been to Herts). Any more questions just fire away
Sounds alright. I'll see when I go for an open day haha
I live in Manchester and the nightlife is good but the only thing putting me off staying is that I would like to spend some time away from the place because it's becoming quite boring if I'm honest haha. So, if all else fails I guess staying in Manc wouldn't be too bad if the course is what I want.

Ohh also, I hear that Nottingham is good for nightlife - Is that what you were saying? - and that NTU is a pretty fun uni to be at? (I might be making this is up haha)
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cbooth5
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Yeah that will help. What is Manchester like as a city to live in? I have always wondered as I think I will like the size of Manchester and might try to get a job and live in Manchester after uni. Is it easy to get to know people or is it more closed and business like like London being a big city?

Lots who have come to Nottingham for university have enjoyed the nightlife especially from the people I know and it is a big enough city to live in for three years and not get bored or lose interest I think. My sis went to NTU and seemed to have fun, apparently freshers is very mad but I cant really judge the social aspects as her large friends group ended up there with her but it seemed a pretty average uni like JMU with it being easy to be sociable in societies and no academic snobbery (not that its a bad thing just a fact) ! Also, on the JMU open day I came back with a notepad and the career options I had wrote down were bullet pointed - 'can work in the - chemical industry - pharmaceutical industry - accountancy -masters/PhD education' and I wish I had asked more detail so I think even though its early days its best to ask what job titles you can actually do afterwards rather than their general overview esp for your case with comparing courses.
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Ronhaar
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(Original post by cbooth5)
Yeah that will help. What is Manchester like as a city to live in? I have always wondered as I think I will like the size of Manchester and might try to get a job and live in Manchester after uni. Is it easy to get to know people or is it more closed and business like like London being a big city?

Lots who have come to Nottingham for university have enjoyed the nightlife especially from the people I know and it is a big enough city to live in for three years and not get bored or lose interest I think. My sis went to NTU and seemed to have fun, apparently freshers is very mad but I cant really judge the social aspects as her large friends group ended up there with her but it seemed a pretty average uni like JMU with it being easy to be sociable in societies and no academic snobbery (not that its a bad thing just a fact) ! Also, on the JMU open day I came back with a notepad and the career options I had wrote down were bullet pointed - 'can work in the - chemical industry - pharmaceutical industry - accountancy -masters/PhD education' and I wish I had asked more detail so I think even though its early days its best to ask what job titles you can actually do afterwards rather than their general overview esp for your case with comparing courses.
Well...Manchester centre is always packed with people shopping as you have the Arndale shopping centre which has a good variety of shops and restaurants, Selfridges is just across the road (other designer shops are next to it i.e. Ted Baker, UGG, Lacoste etc.) as well as The Printworks in the opposite direction - includes an Odeon, a few bars, restaurants and a club.
On the other side of the printworks is Victoria train station which is connected to the Manchester Arena (M.E.N Arena as it used to be called) where you can also catch the trams which go through the centre of the city and beyond. Piccadilly train station is just a short 10 minute walk from Piccadilly Gardens which is where a few cafe's and restaurants are located - there's plenty of them within Manchester!
If you take a short 5 min walk away from the centre and into the northern quarter, you will find an abundance of quaint bars, cafe's and even a few vintage clothes shops.
You also have the gay village which is on Canal St. which is just a load of pubs and clubs. Further down is deansgate (clubs, restaurants + shops).

If you end up going any time soon, I'll give you some good places to go and eat and go clubbing haha (there's too many to list right now!)

I've not spent a lot of time in London to be able to compare but I'd say Manchester is probably the opposite. Manchester is more laid back and fun and you're bound to meet a whole range of personalities and ethnicities here because it has 3 universities (UoM, MMU and Salford).

In summary, the student nights out here are crazy, more than enough bars and clubs, excellent restaurants, the music is awesome too!
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cbooth5
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(Original post by Ronhaar)
Well...Manchester centre is always packed with people shopping as you have the Arndale shopping centre which has a good variety of shops and restaurants, Selfridges is just across the road (other designer shops are next to it i.e. Ted Baker, UGG, Lacoste etc.) as well as The Printworks in the opposite direction - includes an Odeon, a few bars, restaurants and a club.
On the other side of the printworks is Victoria train station which is connected to the Manchester Arena (M.E.N Arena as it used to be called) where you can also catch the trams which go through the centre of the city and beyond. Piccadilly train station is just a short 10 minute walk from Piccadilly Gardens which is where a few cafe's and restaurants are located - there's plenty of them within Manchester!
If you take a short 5 min walk away from the centre and into the northern quarter, you will find an abundance of quaint bars, cafe's and even a few vintage clothes shops.
You also have the gay village which is on Canal St. which is just a load of pubs and clubs. Further down is deansgate (clubs, restaurants + shops).

If you end up going any time soon, I'll give you some good places to go and eat and go clubbing haha (there's too many to list right now!)

I've not spent a lot of time in London to be able to compare but I'd say Manchester is probably the opposite. Manchester is more laid back and fun and you're bound to meet a whole range of personalities and ethnicities here because it has 3 universities (UoM, MMU and Salford).

In summary, the student nights out here are crazy, more than enough bars and clubs, excellent restaurants, the music is awesome too!

Thanks for the detail, sounds my kind of place then : ) don't think I am off there any time soon but probably look at a job to live there after final year. That's great to hear it is laid back and fun, I really like Liverpool for that or big cities that are like that rather than business like and crazy like London! I have only passed through the centre on the train and been in Manchester for roughly 2 hours and it seemed huge so I was unsure of what the vibe was like. I guess its just getting into the social groups when you are new there !
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Ronhaar
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(Original post by cbooth5)
Thanks for the detail, sounds my kind of place then : ) don't think I am off there any time soon but probably look at a job to live there after final year. That's great to hear it is laid back and fun, I really like Liverpool for that or big cities that are like that rather than business like and crazy like London! I have only passed through the centre on the train and been in Manchester for roughly 2 hours and it seemed huge so I was unsure of what the vibe was like. I guess its just getting into the social groups when you are new there !
My sister works and lives in the centre in an apartment so it's really convenient for her. Manchester is quite big tbh - you'll always find a cool little bar/cafe to chill out in and I'm sure you'll find some good friends anywhere you go because the people in general are chilled.
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(Original post by Ronhaar)
My sister works and lives in the centre in an apartment so it's really convenient for her. Manchester is quite big tbh - you'll always find a cool little bar/cafe to chill out in and I'm sure you'll find some good friends anywhere you go because the people in general are chilled.

Oh right that's probably what I would do to start off. It really does sound my type of city just hope there are jobs in my field there that would be a dream come true haha. That's good to know that the people are chilled also in a big city, can't go wrong.
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Also I'm not sure if you've seen this already might clear things up a bit - [URL="http://careers.abpi.org.uk/getting-into-the-industry/Pages/Which-Subject-or-Degree.aspx"]
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