amiemay
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Hi, I'm looking at university courses - and unsure what I could realistically do. I'm doing History, Art, English Literature and Classical Civilisation at AS but I want to do Modern History at university.

I loved studying the Cold War and British Politics in history - so should I do History and Politics? My background knowledge on politics isn't that great and I don't want to apply to a course that's out of my depth.


  • What does a history and politics course actually involve?
  • And what books or research could I do to improve my knowledge/ prepare/ to see if politics would be my thing?
  • History and International Relations - what would this involve?

Thanks
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jelly1000
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(Original post by amiemay)
Hi, I'm looking at university courses - and unsure what I could realistically do. I'm doing History, Art, English Literature and Classical Civilisation at AS but I want to do Modern History at university.

I loved studying the Cold War and British Politics in history - so should I do History and Politics? My background knowledge on politics isn't that great and I don't want to apply to a course that's out of my depth.


  • What does a history and politics course actually involve?
  • And what books or research could I do to improve my knowledge/ prepare/ to see if politics would be my thing?
  • History and International Relations - what would this involve?

Thanks
As Politics A-Level isn't offered by all schools, universities assume that students have little or no prior knowledge of it. The Politics side of uni usually involves more than just British Politics. So you can do History and Politics without a Politics A-level, the History A-Level is the main requirement so don't drop it whatever you do!

In answer to your questions
1) You can see specific modules on the university websites but in short the History side of a modern History course usually involves looking at events from around 1500 onwards. First year is usually an over view of these and then second year onwards you get more choice as to what areas you can pick, for example depending on the universities specialisms you could look at Nazi Germany, Stalin, the Cold War, World War I/II e.c.t

This is UEA's modern History link:

https://www.uea.ac.uk/study/undergra...profile-year-1

The Politics side of things includes theories about governance such as should we have positive discrimination e.c.t as well as looking at how it actually workin practice- both in Britain and beyond, again as with history different universities have different specialisms in the politics of different countries/regions. At UEA there are modules on Australian, US, Russian and EU Politics as well as British

Here is UEA's History and Politics link:
https://www.uea.ac.uk/study/undergra...y-and-politics

I would just recommend reading a good quality newspaper regularly- either The Times, Guardian or Telegraph. If you find your interested in the politics of the different countries mentioned and want to know how their systems work then it could be for you.

History & IR- History as above, IR just looks more at interactions between states e.g. with International Organisations so it does have some overlap with Politics particularly where the EU is concerned and in a Politics degree you can often take IR modules and in an IR degree you can often take Politics modules.

Hope that helps.
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jelly1000
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(Original post by amiemay)
Hi, I'm looking at university courses - and unsure what I could realistically do. I'm doing History, Art, English Literature and Classical Civilisation at AS but I want to do Modern History at university.

I loved studying the Cold War and British Politics in history - so should I do History and Politics? My background knowledge on politics isn't that great and I don't want to apply to a course that's out of my depth.


  • What does a history and politics course actually involve?
  • And what books or research could I do to improve my knowledge/ prepare/ to see if politics would be my thing?
  • History and International Relations - what would this involve?

Thanks
As Politics A-Level isn't offered by all schools, universities assume that students have little or no prior knowledge of it. The Politics side of uni usually involves more than just British Politics. So you can do History and Politics without a Politics A-level, the History A-Level is the main requirement so don't drop it whatever you do!

In answer to your questions
1) You can see specific modules on the university websites but in short the History side of a modern History course usually involves looking at events from around 1500 onwards. First year is usually an over view of these and then second year onwards you get more choice as to what areas you can pick, for example depending on the universities specialisms you could look at Nazi Germany, Stalin, the Cold War, World War I/II e.c.t

This is UEA's modern History link:

https://www.uea.ac.uk/study/undergra...profile-year-1

The Politics side of things includes theories about governance such as should we have positive discrimination e.c.t as well as looking at how it actually workin practice- both in Britain and beyond, again as with history different universities have different specialisms in the politics of different countries/regions. At UEA there are modules on Australian, US, Russian and EU Politics as well as British

Here is UEA's History and Politics link:
https://www.uea.ac.uk/study/undergra...y-and-politics

I would just recommend reading a good quality newspaper regularly- either The Times, Guardian or Telegraph. If you find your interested in the politics of the different countries mentioned and want to know how their systems work then it could be for you.

History & IR- History as above, IR just looks more at interactions between states e.g. with International Organisations so it does have some overlap with Politics particularly where the EU is concerned and in a Politics degree you can often take IR modules and in an IR degree you can often take Politics modules.

Hope that helps.
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amiemay
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(Original post by jelly1000)
As Politics A-Level isn't offered by all schools, universities assume that students have little or no prior knowledge of it. The Politics side of uni usually involves more than just British Politics. So you can do History and Politics without a Politics A-level, the History A-Level is the main requirement so don't drop it whatever you do!

In answer to your questions
1) You can see specific modules on the university websites but in short the History side of a modern History course usually involves looking at events from around 1500 onwards. First year is usually an over view of these and then second year onwards you get more choice as to what areas you can pick, for example depending on the universities specialisms you could look at Nazi Germany, Stalin, the Cold War, World War I/II e.c.t

This is UEA's modern History link:

https://www.uea.ac.uk/study/undergra...profile-year-1

The Politics side of things includes theories about governance such as should we have positive discrimination e.c.t as well as looking at how it actually workin practice- both in Britain and beyond, again as with history different universities have different specialisms in the politics of different countries/regions. At UEA there are modules on Australian, US, Russian and EU Politics as well as British

Here is UEA's History and Politics link:
https://www.uea.ac.uk/study/undergra...y-and-politics

I would just recommend reading a good quality newspaper regularly- either The Times, Guardian or Telegraph. If you find your interested in the politics of the different countries mentioned and want to know how their systems work then it could be for you.

History & IR- History as above, IR just looks more at interactions between states e.g. with International Organisations so it does have some overlap with Politics particularly where the EU is concerned and in a Politics degree you can often take IR modules and in an IR degree you can often take Politics modules.

Hope that helps.
Thank you so much , this is really helpful - it has made my choice a bit clearer
Thanks
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