statistics dice and probability

Watch this thread
economist2
Badges: 19
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#1
Name:  dfharth.png
Views: 221
Size:  58.9 KB

How do I draw the table for this?Or is their a way to do without the table?
I know for two dice throws but this is three...
0
reply
the bear
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 8 years ago
#2
you could draw a tree diagram with 3 stages...
0
reply
BabyMaths
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 8 years ago
#3
(Original post by economist2)
Name:  dfharth.png
Views: 221
Size:  58.9 KB

How do I draw the table for this?Or is their a way to do without the table?
I know for two dice throws but this is three...
Name:  tsr 21 5 14.png
Views: 100
Size:  4.5 KB

I'm sure that you can fill in the rest.

FWIW I think that a tree diagram would be a horrible option.
0
reply
ghostwalker
Badges: 17
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 8 years ago
#4
There're numerous ways to do it.

You could do a table assigning two of the dice to one axes. So, your column, for example, headings might be (1,1), (1,2), ... (4,4), with 64 cells in the table. It has the advantage that each cell will have the same probability.

Or, you could do a table for the sum of 2 dice, and then use that sum as the column headings for a second table. This would give 28 cells in your second table (+16 in the first), but each column would have different probabilities.

Or, as the bear suggested, a tree, but it would have 64 final branches!

Or, my preferred method.
List all possible outcomes, where the dice are sorted into descending order, e.g.
444,443,442,441,433, ..., 111. There are 20 possibilites. Work out the probability of each combination and the sum of the three dice, and add the probabilities for corresponding sums.

Or,....
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Year 12s - where are you at with making decisions about university?

I’ve chosen my course and my university (19)
32.2%
I’ve chosen my course and shortlisted some universities (22)
37.29%
I’ve chosen my course, but not any universities (2)
3.39%
I’ve chosen my university, but not my course (3)
5.08%
I’ve shortlisted some universities, but not my course (4)
6.78%
I’m starting to consider my university options (7)
11.86%
I haven’t started thinking about university yet (1)
1.69%
I’m not planning on going to university (1)
1.69%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed