Mutmit287
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#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
Okay guys I thought it might be a good idea to start to piece together an unofficial mark scheme, as I believe this paper was stupid, and if you guys are anything like me, you would like to feel prepared for whats coming on results day by knowing where you went wrong.
These are only the questions I can remember and I do believe that some of this will probably be wrong so feel free to correct as you see fit. Anything with a ? by it means I am not to sure.

1)a)i) Tissue type: cuboidal epithelial tissue (1mark) location in the body: any glands such as saliva glands etc. (1 mark)

a)ii) Tissue type: columnar epithelial tissue (possibly a mark for villus epithelial cells yet highly unlikely) (1 mark) Location in the body: lining of the trachea/ileum/fallopian tubes (1 mark)

1)b) Definition of an organ: A structure that contains two or more different types of tissue (1 mark) functioning together for a common purpose (1 mark)

?) B – nucleus – function: contains genetic material in the form of chromatin to provide the protein code for dna replication???? (not sure on that one) (1 mark)
C- Nuclear pores – function: to allow messenger RNA and nucleotides to exit the nucleus and enter the cytoplasm. (1 mark)
D – nucleolus (1 mark) – function: produces ribosomal RNA (1 mark)

?) Difference between the nuclear membrane and the mitochondrial membrane: Any 1 from: mitochondrial membrane is infolded to form cristae, nuclear membrane is not: Mitchondrial membrane has a fluid filled inter membrane space, the nuclear membrane does not.

?) 2 differences between prokaryotic and animal cell ribosomes: any two from: in animal cells ribosomes are much larger than in prokaryotic cells (1 mark) : in animal cells ribosomes can be in the cytoplasm or attached to the rough endoplasmic reticulum, in prokaryotic cells they are only found in the cytoplasm (1 marks)

?) 3 differences between mitotic daughter cells and meiotic daughter cells:
Mitotic daughter cells: diploid, genetically identical/clones, go on to become regular bodily cells???
Meiotic daughter cells: haploid, genetically varied/different/not clones, go on to become gametes???
(3 marks awarded for three comparisons)

?)Drawn DNA nucleotide.
A – phosphate group
B – deoxyribose sugar
C – organic nitrogenous base

?) differences between DNA and RNA polymers: any two from:
DNA has deoxyribose sugar wheras RNA has ribose sugar: DNA contains the bases, adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine wheras in RNA thymine is replaced by uracil (4 marks?)

?) Chitin question:
a) Group it belonged to: carbohydrates (might accept polysaccharides but that wasn’t the group) (1 mark)
b) Difference in its structure: Every other molecule was rotated 180 degrees allowing hydrogen bonds to form between the layers, as these hydrogen bonds are very strong it creates a strong exoskeleton. (chitin is pretty much just cellulose with an amino groups on it) (2 marks)
c) Group amino group belonged too: protein (again may allow amino acid but might be picky as it isn’t really its group) (1 mark)

?)Vitamin A and glucose, cell membranes:
Vitamin A: as it was lipid soluble it moved by diffusion through the phospholipid bilayer (1 mark) it moved from an area of high to low concentration over a concentration gradient (1 mark??)
Glucose: as it was water soluble it could not move through the phospholipid bilayer and thus moved by facilitated diffusion (1 mark) from an area of high to low concentration via intrinsic/channel/carrier proteins in the membrane (1 mark)

?)diffusion and active transport graphs:
?) width of the cell membrane: 7nm (need units for one mark) (in the teachers guide it says between 7 and 8 so they may have that range)
a) Graph A – describe the type of movement across the cell membrane: diffusion (1 mark) as there was no limiting factor/as concentration of oxygen increased, the rate of uptake also increased at the same rate (1 mark)
b) Graph B – describe between A and B the why this occurred for nitrogen Ions: as the concentration of nitrogen ions was much less than the amount of carrier/ channel protiens/ no limiting factor (1 mark)
c) What was the method of transport in graph B: (it said cyanide poison meaning that it had to be an active process) active transport (1 mark)

?) water potential = -300KPA (need both answer, correct sign and units for two marks) (if units are not present only one mark)

?) inorganic ion in the haem group: iron (1 mark)

?) why is it a Quaternary protein:they are made up of four subunits/tertiary protiens joined together/ polpeptide chains joined toegther (1 mark) which are joined by bonds between the variable/R groups of the amino acids (1 mark)

?)immobilised enzymes:
a) two advantages about immobilized enzymes: (any 2 from) more than one enzyme differeing in optimum can be used at the same time: the reaction can be easily controlled by the adding or removed of the immobilised enzymes: The enzymes can be reused which lowers the overall costs (2 marks)
b) effect of slowing down the flow: it would mean that more substrate would react as previously the active sites would have been occupied/the substrate would have been moving too fast. (1 mark) Thus if it is a slower flow there will be more chance of successful collisions and more juice will be made as product. (1 mark)
c)test for protiens: adding buiret solution to the sample (1 mark) after shaking the blue rung on the surface will dissapear and the solution will become purple if protein is present (1 mark)
d)test for a specific protien: biosensor which is specific to that particular protien(1 mark)

?) b) essay on golgi body, rough endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes (10 marks)
Rough endoplasmic reticulum:
· (internal) system of flattened sacs/cisternae/membrane compartments (any two for one mark)
· Ribosomes attached
· Used to transport products of protein synthesis
· Continuous with the nuclear membrane
Golgi Body
· Consist of (interconnected) flattened (membranous) sacs
· Proteins from RER are transported here in vesicles
· Vesicles fuse with the golgi membrane and the contents are shed into the golgi sacs (at the cis face)
· They are built into more complex molecules such as enzymes/glycoproteins
· One other golgi function is carbohydrate secretion/transporting and storing lipids
· At the other end vesicles containing products/lysosomes bud off
· These can fuse with the plasma membrane cause exocytosis of contents
Lysosomes
· Are membrane bound vesicles/sacs which contain digestive enzymes
· They fuse with the membrane of the cell vacuole and enzymes digest contents
· These contents would have previously been enclosed by phagocytosis
· They break down worn out organelles/cause autolysis
A maximum of 10 marks can be awarded from the fifteen available
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crawfy
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#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
There was the question based around the apple juice and enzymes, but I don't really remember many of the details :/ sorry that's not very useful!!


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Mutmit287
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#3
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#3
(Original post by crawfy)
There was the question based around the apple juice and enzymes, but I don't really remember many of the details :/ sorry that's not very useful!!
Posted from TSR Mobile
I literally just remembered that one now, i have added it above.
I could not for the life of me remember the beetroot question and im not too sure of the answers so i am not going to add that one just yet.
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AK_47
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#4
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#4
Why does the red pigment leak out when immersed 70% Solution? It's do with Osmosis I think...
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Meagerarc
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#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
I think it is because the plasma membrane that surrounds the vacuole dissolves in the organic solvent so the pigment is able to leak out into the solution.
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AK_47
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#6
Report 7 years ago
#6
(Original post by Meagerarc)
I think it is because the plasma membrane that surrounds the vacuole dissolves in the organic solvent so the pigment is able to leak out into the solution.
I've never heard of that to be honest, the cell has a high H water potential, so water moves out to an area of low water potential and it was a hypotonic solution. So the red pigment leaks out.
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Doomlar
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#7
Report 7 years ago
#7
(Original post by AK_47)
I've never heard of that to be honest, the cell has a high H water potential, so water moves out to an area of low water potential and it was a hypotonic solution. So the red pigment leaks out.
Well lipids do dissolve in organic solvents, and it did explicitly mention that ethanol was an organic solvent; I put about the cell membrane dissolving though so I don't know if that is correct...
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jakkee
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#8
Report 7 years ago
#8
(Original post by Natalierm2707)
Okay guys I thought it might be a good idea to start to piece together an unofficial mark scheme, as I believe this paper was stupid, and if you guys are anything like me, you would like to feel prepared for whats coming on results day by knowing where you went wrong.
These are only the questions I can remember and I do believe that some of this will probably be wrong so feel free to correct as you see fit. Anything with a ? by it means I am not to sure.

1)a)i) Tissue type: cuboidal epithelial tissue (1mark) location in the body: any glands such as saliva glands etc. (1 mark)

a)ii) Tissue type: columnar epithelial tissue (possibly a mark for villus epithelial cells yet highly unlikely) (1 mark) Location in the body: lining of the trachea/ileum/fallopian tubes (1 mark)

1)b) Definition of an organ: A structure that contains two or more different types of tissue (1 mark) functioning together for a common purpose (1 mark)

?) B – nucleus – function: contains genetic material in the form of chromatin to provide the protein code for dna replication???? (not sure on that one) (1 mark)
C- Nuclear pores – function: to allow messenger RNA and nucleotides to exit the nucleus and enter the cytoplasm. (1 mark)
D – nucleolus (1 mark) – function: produces ribosomal RNA (1 mark)

?) Difference between the nuclear membrane and the mitochondrial membrane: Any 1 from: mitochondrial membrane is infolded to form cristae, nuclear membrane is not: Mitchondrial membrane has a fluid filled inter membrane space, the nuclear membrane does not.

?) 2 differences between prokaryotic and animal cell ribosomes: any two from: in animal cells ribosomes are much larger than in prokaryotic cells (1 mark) : in animal cells ribosomes can be in the cytoplasm or attached to the rough endoplasmic reticulum, in prokaryotic cells they are only found in the cytoplasm (1 marks)

?) 3 differences between mitotic daughter cells and meiotic daughter cells:
Mitotic daughter cells: diploid, genetically identical/clones, go on to become regular bodily cells???
Meiotic daughter cells: haploid, genetically varied/different/not clones, go on to become gametes???
(3 marks awarded for three comparisons)

?)Drawn DNA nucleotide.
A – phosphate group
B – deoxyribose sugar
C – organic nitrogenous base

?) differences between DNA and RNA polymers: any two from:
DNA has deoxyribose sugar wheras RNA has ribose sugar: DNA contains the bases, adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine wheras in RNA thymine is replaced by uracil (4 marks?)

?) Chitin question:
a) Group it belonged to: carbohydrates (might accept polysaccharides but that wasn’t the group) (1 mark)
b) Difference in its structure: Every other molecule was rotated 180 degrees allowing hydrogen bonds to form between the layers, as these hydrogen bonds are very strong it creates a strong exoskeleton. (chitin is pretty much just cellulose with an amino groups on it) (2 marks)
c) Group amino group belonged too: protein (again may allow amino acid but might be picky as it isn’t really its group) (1 mark)

?)Vitamin A and glucose, cell membranes:
Vitamin A: as it was lipid soluble it moved by diffusion through the phospholipid bilayer (1 mark) it moved from an area of high to low concentration over a concentration gradient (1 mark??)
Glucose: as it was water soluble it could not move through the phospholipid bilayer and thus moved by facilitated diffusion (1 mark) from an area of high to low concentration via intrinsic/channel/carrier proteins in the membrane (1 mark)

?)diffusion and active transport graphs:
?) width of the cell membrane: 7nm (need units for one mark) (in the teachers guide it says between 7 and 8 so they may have that range)
a) Graph A – describe the type of movement across the cell membrane: diffusion (1 mark) as there was no limiting factor/as concentration of oxygen increased, the rate of uptake also increased at the same rate (1 mark)
b) Graph B – describe between A and B the why this occurred for nitrogen Ions: as the concentration of nitrogen ions was much less than the amount of carrier/ channel protiens/ no limiting factor (1 mark)
c) What was the method of transport in graph B: (it said cyanide poison meaning that it had to be an active process) active transport (1 mark)

?) water potential = -300KPA (need both answer, correct sign and units for two marks) (if units are not present only one mark)

?) inorganic ion in the haem group: iron (1 mark)

?) why is it a Quaternary protein:they are made up of four subunits/tertiary protiens joined together/ polpeptide chains joined toegther (1 mark) which are joined by bonds between the variable/R groups of the amino acids (1 mark)

?)immobilised enzymes:
a) two advantages about immobilized enzymes: (any 2 from) more than one enzyme differeing in optimum can be used at the same time: the reaction can be easily controlled by the adding or removed of the immobilised enzymes: The enzymes can be reused which lowers the overall costs (2 marks)
b) effect of slowing down the flow: it would mean that more substrate would react as previously the active sites would have been occupied/the substrate would have been moving too fast. (1 mark) Thus if it is a slower flow there will be more chance of successful collisions and more juice will be made as product. (1 mark)
c)test for protiens: adding buiret solution to the sample (1 mark) after shaking the blue rung on the surface will dissapear and the solution will become purple if protein is present (1 mark)
d)test for a specific protien: biosensor which is specific to that particular protien(1 mark)

?) b) essay on golgi body, rough endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes (10 marks)
Rough endoplasmic reticulum:
· (internal) system of flattened sacs/cisternae/membrane compartments (any two for one mark)
· Ribosomes attached
· Used to transport products of protein synthesis
· Continuous with the nuclear membrane
Golgi Body
· Consist of (interconnected) flattened (membranous) sacs
· Proteins from RER are transported here in vesicles
· Vesicles fuse with the golgi membrane and the contents are shed into the golgi sacs (at the cis face)
· They are built into more complex molecules such as enzymes/glycoproteins
· One other golgi function is carbohydrate secretion/transporting and storing lipids
· At the other end vesicles containing products/lysosomes bud off
· These can fuse with the plasma membrane cause exocytosis of contents
Lysosomes
· Are membrane bound vesicles/sacs which contain digestive enzymes
· They fuse with the membrane of the cell vacuole and enzymes digest contents
· These contents would have previously been enclosed by phagocytosis
· They break down worn out organelles/cause autolysis
A maximum of 10 marks can be awarded from the fifteen available
you left out the denaturing of enzymes question and graph after the apple juice question. Also you forgot to add the question after DNA about the stages of cell division, other than that really helpful thanks
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dogs4eva7
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#9
Report 7 years ago
#9
(Original post by Doomlar)
Well lipids do dissolve in organic solvents, and it did explicitly mention that ethanol was an organic solvent; I put about the cell membrane dissolving though so I don't know if that is correct...
(Original post by AK_47)
I've never heard of that to be honest, the cell has a high H water potential, so water moves out to an area of low water potential and it was a hypotonic solution. So the red pigment leaks out.
I was gonna write about osmosis at first but after coming back to that question about 6 times, I wrote about lipids dissolving in organic solvents?

It's in other past papers as well, especially the specimen one
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_joeconroy
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#10
Report 7 years ago
#10
(Original post by Natalierm2707)
Okay guys I thought it might be a good idea to start to piece together an unofficial mark scheme, as I believe this paper was stupid, and if you guys are anything like me, you would like to feel prepared for whats coming on results day by knowing where you went wrong.
These are only the questions I can remember and I do believe that some of this will probably be wrong so feel free to correct as you see fit. Anything with a ? by it means I am not to sure.

1)a)i) Tissue type: cuboidal epithelial tissue (1mark) location in the body: any glands such as saliva glands etc. (1 mark)

a)ii) Tissue type: columnar epithelial tissue (possibly a mark for villus epithelial cells yet highly unlikely) (1 mark) Location in the body: lining of the trachea/ileum/fallopian tubes (1 mark)

1)b) Definition of an organ: A structure that contains two or more different types of tissue (1 mark) functioning together for a common purpose (1 mark)

?) B – nucleus – function: contains genetic material in the form of chromatin to provide the protein code for dna replication???? (not sure on that one) (1 mark)
C- Nuclear pores – function: to allow messenger RNA and nucleotides to exit the nucleus and enter the cytoplasm. (1 mark)
D – nucleolus (1 mark) – function: produces ribosomal RNA (1 mark)

?) Difference between the nuclear membrane and the mitochondrial membrane: Any 1 from: mitochondrial membrane is infolded to form cristae, nuclear membrane is not: Mitchondrial membrane has a fluid filled inter membrane space, the nuclear membrane does not.

?) 2 differences between prokaryotic and animal cell ribosomes: any two from: in animal cells ribosomes are much larger than in prokaryotic cells (1 mark) : in animal cells ribosomes can be in the cytoplasm or attached to the rough endoplasmic reticulum, in prokaryotic cells they are only found in the cytoplasm (1 marks)

?) 3 differences between mitotic daughter cells and meiotic daughter cells:
Mitotic daughter cells: diploid, genetically identical/clones, go on to become regular bodily cells???
Meiotic daughter cells: haploid, genetically varied/different/not clones, go on to become gametes???
(3 marks awarded for three comparisons)

?)Drawn DNA nucleotide.
A – phosphate group
B – deoxyribose sugar
C – organic nitrogenous base

?) differences between DNA and RNA polymers: any two from:
DNA has deoxyribose sugar wheras RNA has ribose sugar: DNA contains the bases, adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine wheras in RNA thymine is replaced by uracil (4 marks?)

?) Chitin question:
a) Group it belonged to: carbohydrates (might accept polysaccharides but that wasn’t the group) (1 mark)
b) Difference in its structure: Every other molecule was rotated 180 degrees allowing hydrogen bonds to form between the layers, as these hydrogen bonds are very strong it creates a strong exoskeleton. (chitin is pretty much just cellulose with an amino groups on it) (2 marks)
c) Group amino group belonged too: protein (again may allow amino acid but might be picky as it isn’t really its group) (1 mark)

?)Vitamin A and glucose, cell membranes:
Vitamin A: as it was lipid soluble it moved by diffusion through the phospholipid bilayer (1 mark) it moved from an area of high to low concentration over a concentration gradient (1 mark??)
Glucose: as it was water soluble it could not move through the phospholipid bilayer and thus moved by facilitated diffusion (1 mark) from an area of high to low concentration via intrinsic/channel/carrier proteins in the membrane (1 mark)

?)diffusion and active transport graphs:
?) width of the cell membrane: 7nm (need units for one mark) (in the teachers guide it says between 7 and 8 so they may have that range)
a) Graph A – describe the type of movement across the cell membrane: diffusion (1 mark) as there was no limiting factor/as concentration of oxygen increased, the rate of uptake also increased at the same rate (1 mark)
b) Graph B – describe between A and B the why this occurred for nitrogen Ions: as the concentration of nitrogen ions was much less than the amount of carrier/ channel protiens/ no limiting factor (1 mark)
c) What was the method of transport in graph B: (it said cyanide poison meaning that it had to be an active process) active transport (1 mark)

?) water potential = -300KPA (need both answer, correct sign and units for two marks) (if units are not present only one mark)

?) inorganic ion in the haem group: iron (1 mark)

?) why is it a Quaternary protein:they are made up of four subunits/tertiary protiens joined together/ polpeptide chains joined toegther (1 mark) which are joined by bonds between the variable/R groups of the amino acids (1 mark)

?)immobilised enzymes:
a) two advantages about immobilized enzymes: (any 2 from) more than one enzyme differeing in optimum can be used at the same time: the reaction can be easily controlled by the adding or removed of the immobilised enzymes: The enzymes can be reused which lowers the overall costs (2 marks)
b) effect of slowing down the flow: it would mean that more substrate would react as previously the active sites would have been occupied/the substrate would have been moving too fast. (1 mark) Thus if it is a slower flow there will be more chance of successful collisions and more juice will be made as product. (1 mark)
c)test for protiens: adding buiret solution to the sample (1 mark) after shaking the blue rung on the surface will dissapear and the solution will become purple if protein is present (1 mark)
d)test for a specific protien: biosensor which is specific to that particular protien(1 mark)

?) b) essay on golgi body, rough endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes (10 marks)
Rough endoplasmic reticulum:
· (internal) system of flattened sacs/cisternae/membrane compartments (any two for one mark)
· Ribosomes attached
· Used to transport products of protein synthesis
· Continuous with the nuclear membrane
Golgi Body
· Consist of (interconnected) flattened (membranous) sacs
· Proteins from RER are transported here in vesicles
· Vesicles fuse with the golgi membrane and the contents are shed into the golgi sacs (at the cis face)
· They are built into more complex molecules such as enzymes/glycoproteins
· One other golgi function is carbohydrate secretion/transporting and storing lipids
· At the other end vesicles containing products/lysosomes bud off
· These can fuse with the plasma membrane cause exocytosis of contents
Lysosomes
· Are membrane bound vesicles/sacs which contain digestive enzymes
· They fuse with the membrane of the cell vacuole and enzymes digest contents
· These contents would have previously been enclosed by phagocytosis
· They break down worn out organelles/cause autolysis
A maximum of 10 marks can be awarded from the fifteen available
I think for the DNA polymer one you can also talk about double helix vs single coil because the question talks about DNA polymers? I read polymer as in nucleotide = monomer, polmyer is DNA 'strand'. I may be wrong though
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crawfy
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#11
Report 7 years ago
#11
(Original post by _joeconroy)
I think for the DNA polymer one you can also talk about double helix vs single coil because the question talks about DNA polymers? I read polymer as in nucleotide = monomer, polmyer is DNA 'strand'. I may be wrong though
I agree, I did the same as you. First time round I read it as if it meant just the nucleotide but when I checked through my paper I noticed the word polymer and added it in


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_joeconroy
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#12
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#12
It makes sense because a single nucleotide wouldn't class as DNA... Did anybody say that chitin was in the mucopolysaccharides group, or was I too specific?
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RAV 123
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#13
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#13
I thought the Chitin group was mucopolysacharides? That's what I wrote.
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dontsmackthejack
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#14
Report 7 years ago
#14
(Original post by _joeconroy)
It makes sense because a single nucleotide wouldn't class as DNA... Did anybody say that chitin was in the mucopolysaccharides group, or was I too specific?
I put it was a carbohydrate but put mucopolysaccarides in brackets
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Doomlar
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#15
Report 7 years ago
#15
(Original post by jenigma)
I was gonna write about osmosis at first but after coming back to that question about 6 times, I wrote about lipids dissolving in organic solvents?

It's in other past papers as well, especially the specimen one
In those past papers what does the mark scheme say? :O
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jellybanana
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#16
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#16
Thanks so much for making this, it's so helpful! The beetroot question was something along the lines of when beetroot is placed in a solution of 70% ethanol and heated at 15 degrees celcius, suggest why the solution turns red and then the question after that was like why does this happen quicker at 30 degrees celcius. Don't know if that's any help at all!

The questions to do with the apple juice graph were something like why did the free enzymes begin to produce less product after 40 degrees, then you had to suggest why the immobilised enzymes in the alginate beads were more efficient than those bound to the gel membrane. I'm sorry it's so vague, but it might help jog someone's memory!
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dogs4eva7
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#17
Report 7 years ago
#17
(Original post by Doomlar)
In those past papers what does the mark scheme say? :O
Okay it's not the EXACT same question but I can't look at it rn, but check for yourself:
Google Castle school biology and look at their AS past papers, the specimen one is the first one

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Mutmit287
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#18
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#18
Ii wish i could get hold of the actual paper so i could do this properly, its so confused when the questions are not in order!!!
also guys I have decided not to post any of the answers I am not too sure on, as i don't want to give anybody false hope. I know i got the beetroot one wrong because i just said diffusion instead of solvents dissolving the membrane! Ii literally screwed so bad on this paper, Ii cannot believe that WJEC were even allowed to let us sit this because it was a total joke. I was on target for an A* in biology next year and now i will have to settle with like a B and i can wave bye bye to my future in medicine!
i hate how WJEC think they have the right to mess with our futures like this!
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jellybanana
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#19
Report 7 years ago
#19
(Original post by Natalierm2707)
Ii wish i could get hold of the actual paper so i could do this properly, its so confused when the questions are not in order!!!
also guys I have decided not to post any of the answers I am not too sure on, as i don't want to give anybody false hope. I know i got the beetroot one wrong because i just said diffusion instead of solvents dissolving the membrane! Ii literally screwed so bad on this paper, Ii cannot believe that WJEC were even allowed to let us sit this because it was a total joke. I was on target for an A* in biology next year and now i will have to settle with like a B and i can wave bye bye to my future in medicine!
i hate how WJEC think they have the right to mess with our futures like this!
Wow sounds like you got it really rough

Don't give up hope though, there's still BY2 and you nearly always feel you did worse than you actually did! Just focus on the positive stuff, because it's easy to look over the questions that went well when you focus on the silly mistakes you made. There's also the coursework to fall back on, and that made up about 25% I think- if you got an A in that it could be enough to move you up a grade!
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Mutmit287
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#20
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#20
(Original post by jellybanana)
Wow sounds like you got it really rough

Don't give up hope though, there's still BY2 and you nearly always feel you did worse than you actually did! Just focus on the positive stuff, because it's easy to look over the questions that went well when you focus on the silly mistakes you made. There's also the coursework to fall back on, and that made up about 25% I think- if you got an A in that it could be enough to move you up a grade!
It did go really badly, but thanks honestly that was the nicest thing someone has said to me all day, and you are right i probably am just focusing on what went bad, i cant even remember the questions that went well and what i actually wrote, anyway its in the past and now to focus on BY2 and try to get a solid A! I know i can do it, and if it means resitting BY1 next year then so be it, we can only ever try our best.

As for the coursework my teacher was really bad and kinda told us what he thought we would get and overall i got 5/6 in the microscope drawing (because my rubbing out was so obvious) and i got one off full marks in the practical exam, which means if i work off last years grade boundaries i will get one off full UMS in that, which is 59 ums!!
so that means that to get an A overall in AS biology i can drop 59 more UMS marks on BY1 and BY2!! meaning i only need high B's on both of these, and as the AS year does not count towards the A* grades (to get the A* you must achieve an A overall at A level and get 90% or above in the A2 modules) I maybe can still be sucessful, that has really cheered me up
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