Scots Law or Medicine? Watch

Doc.Daneeka
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Hi all, I’m currently very conflicted about going back to university to study a professional degree in either Scots law or medicine. Some bulletpoints:

What doing law means:
· Study a subject which has been associated with my undergraduate degree in philosophy in many international regions
· Begin a two year LL.B. at the University of Edinburgh in September 2014
· Self-fund approximately £18,000 of tuition fees over the two years
· Begin a two year traineeship in 2017 and qualify as a solicitor in 2019

What doing medicine means:
· Study a subject which I have been interested in, have studied 'the philosophy of', gained experience of via my current job as an auxiliary nurse, and which leads to a career that I had wanted for a few years now, but given up on the idea of
· Return to college in 2014-15 to gain the Highers which I currently lack
· Possibly receive an offer to study a five year MBChB at either the University of Aberdeen, Edinburgh, or Glasgow in September 2015
· Self-fund approximately £9,100 of tuition fees over the five years
· Begin a two year foundation and qualify as a doctor in 2020

The problem (for me):
Do I take the shorter, but more expensive option of law which I can begin at the University of Edinburgh in September 2014 or; do I try for the longer, but less expensive option of medicine which I could potentially begin in September 2015? Do I go with what has been on my mind for a while now or do I opt for what is probably better suited to my current skillset?

In terms of salary and career progression: Law would allow me to start earning money sooner, but there’s less certainty as to what I could be earning as I progress. Medicine, on the other hand, would mean I start earning money later, but with more certainty as to both my salary and career progression.

Can anyone interested in helping me decide please say what they would opt for and why?
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Schadenfreude65
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Taking the long view of your potential career, the difference in time and cost of getting qualified is really very little, unless there will be sufficient difficulty in raising funds that you may have to drop out. Getting into medicine will probably be more difficult than law, but you still have law as a Plan B if you don't get any offers.

Law and medicine are such different fields, that I think your deciding factor should be which has the most appeal as a career. You will probably be working for much longer than you will be studying, so you need to decide which will be most enjoyable and satisfying for you.
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Doc.Daneeka
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(Original post by Schadenfreude65)
Taking the long view of your potential career, the difference in time and cost of getting qualified is really very little, unless there will be sufficient difficulty in raising funds that you may have to drop out. Getting into medicine will probably be more difficult than law, but you still have law as a Plan B if you don't get any offers.

Law and medicine are such different fields, that I think your deciding factor should be which has the most appeal as a career. You will probably be working for much longer than you will be studying, so you need to decide which will be most enjoyable and satisfying for you.
To be honest by the time I'd typed the thread up and then gone to think about it a little it seems obvious to me that I should aim for medicine in 2015 and if I don't get in then I can switch my application to law. I figure if I can't get in with all the experience, professional reference, and qualifications that I'll have then I'm unlikely to get in ever and I'll be content with the effort I put in.
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Doc.Daneeka
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(Original post by maskofsanity)
Won't that mean doing Highers this year and deferring your LLB? Law firms are going to be wondering why you went back to college, presumably to study chem/bio.

What have you been doing since your MA?
Hi, it would yes but I would be taking four Highers as I currently have none. Since my MA I've been working in a hospital.
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