A couple of questions for a learner driver ...

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Burridge
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Hey, so I'm just doing my driving lessons and I have a quick (but basic) question:

If I'm slowing right down - not stopping, but slowing right down (i.e I'm not using my handbrake), do I need to find the biting point again to move off? Say, for example, I come to a near stationary position (like 2mph?), do I need to find the biting point again or can I just put my foot onto the accelerator? If I go this slow the chances are that I will need to put my foot on the clutch as I'm slowing down (to stop the car from stalling), but once I'm ready to move off again, do I need to find the biting point again?

Basically, the kind of situation I'm talking about here would be stop-go-stop-go rush hour traffic - whats the usual protocol for dealing with this? My driving instructor insists that I use my handbrake whenever I'm stopping properly (I think it's because I'm just getting into my lessons), but it's not feasible for rush hour traffic when you're stopping and starting so much - what is the usual way of dealing with this? Is finding the biting point when you're using the brake (as opposed to handbrake) any different?

I'm new to all of this, haha.

Cheers
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King Leonidas
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(Original post by Burridge)
Hey, so I'm just doing my driving lessons and I have a quick (but basic) question:

If I'm slowing right down - not stopping, but slowing right down (i.e I'm not using my handbrake), do I need to find the biting point again to move off? Say, for example, I come to a near stationary position (like 2mph?), do I need to find the biting point again or can I just put my foot onto the accelerator? If I go this slow the chances are that I will need to put my foot on the clutch as I'm slowing down (to stop the car from stalling), but once I'm ready to move off again, do I need to find the biting point again?

Basically, the kind of situation I'm talking about here would be stop-go-stop-go rush hour traffic - whats the usual protocol for dealing with this? My driving instructor insists that I use my handbrake whenever I'm stopping properly (I think it's because I'm just getting into my lessons), but it's not feasible for rush hour traffic when you're stopping and starting so much - what is the usual way of dealing with this? Is finding the biting point when you're using the brake (as opposed to handbrake) any different?

I'm new to all of this, haha.

Cheers
When you're slowing down in rush hour traffic you will need to reduce your speed and get into a lower gear, second gear is ample for slow moving traffic. If you are not stationary in traffic then there is no need to touch the clutch, just stay in a low gear. However, once you come to a stop, then you have to get into first gear and put your foot on the brake. It is only at this point you will need to find the bite again and apply some gas to move off.

I hope that helped, please tell me if I didn't answer your question properly.
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Burridge
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(Original post by King Leonidas)
When you're slowing down in rush hour traffic you will need to reduce your speed and get into a lower gear, second gear is ample for slow moving traffic. If you are not stationary in traffic then there is no need to touch the clutch, just stay in a low gear. However, once you come to a stop, then you have to get into first gear and put your foot on the brake. It is only at this point you will need to find the bite again and apply some gas to move off.

I hope that helped, please tell me if I didn't answer your question properly.
OK, thanks. I appreciate it!

But, if I roll to a really slow speed (or use the brake to slow right down, too), then I have to apply the clutch otherwise I will stall, right? So, if I go slow enough that I need to apply the clutch, but I'm still not stationary (and don't plan on becoming stationary - e.g I'm pulling in for a car to pass, then the car passes (but I'm still moving very slowly), and I go again), what do I need to do after this? Do I need to find the biting point again? If so, how is it any different from finding the biting point when you use the handbrake? (This ties into my second point). So, if I'm rolling at 1 or 2 MPH, whats the deal with moving off again, and how does it go?

- How do people seem to move off so quick? As I say, I'm a learner driver ... starting off takes quite some time. It's a case of clutch down, gear, accelerator on, clutch up to biting point, handbrake off ... and then move off, but everyone else seems to just be moving off instantly. What's the deal with this? I understand that with time it becomes easier to find the biting point, but does everyone go through the exact same process when moving off, or are there different ways to move off?

Cheers
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username647214
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Setting off is hard at first, but after a time it becomes second nature and you'll soon get to the speed that others are going. Most people don't use their handbrake at all, instead they either use their brake with the clutch down or use their clutch in first gear and steady themselves.

You tend to find that some people can keep it perfectly at biting point where the car will not move forward or backwards, or get those that roll back a bit, then bring the clutch up to move forward a bit again and then repeat.

If I was in slow moving traffic I would bring the clutch down and then use the brake, then bring the clutch up slightly to biting point and release the brake and move forward if traffic was moving every so often. If I need to stop, then that's a case of clutch down, brake applied and then handbrake on.
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Burridge
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(Original post by AmbaLaBamba)
Setting off is hard at first, but after a time it becomes second nature and you'll soon get to the speed that others are going. Most people don't use their handbrake at all, instead they either use their brake with the clutch down or use their clutch in first gear and steady themselves.

You tend to find that some people can keep it perfectly at biting point where the car will not move forward or backwards, or get those that roll back a bit, then bring the clutch up to move forward a bit again and then repeat.

If I was in slow moving traffic I would bring the clutch down and then use the brake, then bring the clutch up slightly to biting point and release the brake and move forward if traffic was moving every so often. If I need to stop, then that's a case of clutch down, brake applied and then handbrake on.
Cheers for the help.

Is it easier to find the biting point of the car when the handbrake is off? So you have stopped using the foot brake, but are ready to move off again immediately afterwards ... will the car start to move (provided you've got your foot off the brake and apply a little bit of gas) on its own as you slowly bring the clutch up? If so, this makes it easier than starting off from a complete standstill (using handbrake), right?

-- Edit: Just re-read what you said "... bring the clutch up slightly to biting point and release the brake" - so you find the biting point and then release the brake? Does it not make sense to just have your foot off the brake, and then if you lift the clutch the car will slowly roll forward, at which point you apply gas?
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King Leonidas
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(Original post by Burridge)
Cheers for the help.

Is it easier to find the biting point of the car when the handbrake is off? So you have stopped using the foot brake, but are ready to move off again immediately afterwards ... will the car start to move (provided you've got your foot off the brake and apply a little bit of gas) on its own as you slowly bring the clutch up? If so, this makes it easier than starting off from a complete standstill (using handbrake), right?

-- Edit: Just re-read what you said "... bring the clutch up slightly to biting point and release the brake" - so you find the biting point and then release the brake? Does it not make sense to just have your foot off the brake, and then if you lift the clutch the car will slowly roll forward, at which point you apply gas?
What you said, when moving off you take your foot off the brake, release the clutch slowly to the find the bite, you can apply some gas before even finding the bite to prevent you from stalling.

When you car is moving slowly it will not rattle/stall in first gear, if your foot is on the clutch whilst still moving slowly then just lift it up slowly and apply gas, the bite is not needed whilst moving.
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Burridge
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(Original post by King Leonidas)
What you said, when moving off you take your foot off the brake, release the clutch slowly to the find the bite, you can apply some gas before even finding the bite to prevent you from stalling.

When you car is moving slowly it will not rattle/stall in first gear, if your foot is on the clutch whilst still moving slowly then just lift it up slowly and apply gas, the bite is not needed whilst moving.
Awesome. Thanks for the help!
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