Turn on thread page Beta

WJEC AS Spanish SN2 - June 3rd 2014 watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Hey guys,

    Spanish is probably my weakest subject and I simply can't get my head around certain aspects of the exam. I'm fine with the listening and grammar sections but the gap fill and writing is a complete mystery. Has anyone got any advice on how the article is even supposed to help you with the gap fill or how to construct the writing?

    Thanks and good luck!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey! I'm doing the same exam as you

    With the gap fill, I usually put a mark next to each of the words on the list for a verb, adjective and noun, it really helps as it lets you cancel out a lot of the words. Also, the article can be really useful given that the gap fill is just a summary of it!

    For the essay, I usually get 32/35 and the structure I do is this:
    For example, if the statement was: "el turismo verde es cada vez más importante hoy en día"
    Introduction - Answer the question but reference that there are other factors too, e.g adventure tourism and cultural tourism can be more important
    Paragraph 1 and 2 - Factors which support the idea that green tourism is important (try to think of two good ones)
    Paragraph 3 and 4 - Factors which disagree - other types which are more important (try to think of two good ones)
    Conclusion - Sum it all up and mention both the factors which agree and disagree. Then, reach a solid judgement!

    Hope this helps, ¡Suerte!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TinyPuppyPaws)
    Hey! I'm doing the same exam as you

    With the gap fill, I usually put a mark next to each of the words on the list for a verb, adjective and noun, it really helps as it lets you cancel out a lot of the words. Also, the article can be really useful given that the gap fill is just a summary of it!

    For the essay, I usually get 32/35 and the structure I do is this:
    For example, if the statement was: "el turismo verde es cada vez más importante hoy en día"
    Introduction - Answer the question but reference that there are other factors too, e.g adventure tourism and cultural tourism can be more important
    Paragraph 1 and 2 - Factors which support the idea that green tourism is important (try to think of two good ones)
    Paragraph 3 and 4 - Factors which disagree - other types which are more important (try to think of two good ones)
    Conclusion - Sum it all up and mention both the factors which agree and disagree. Then, reach a solid judgement!

    Hope this helps, ¡Suerte!
    Oh wow, thanks a lot! Your essay technique clearly seems to be working, so I'll give it a go Do you do an introduction and answer the question straight away? If not how do you introduce/start the essay?

    I never even thought about grouping the gap fill words like that, I've only been doing it by tense!! Shows how well I've been taught -_- That should make it so much easier.

    Also, for 3(a) do you read the 10 sentences with the tick boxes and then read the article or vice versa? That's the only other one I'm truly stumped on, the listening and general grammar ones are quite straight forward.

    Muchas gracias y suerte a ti!
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shu003)
    Hey guys,

    Spanish is probably my weakest subject and I simply can't get my head around certain aspects of the exam. I'm fine with the listening and grammar sections but the gap fill and writing is a complete mystery. Has anyone got any advice on how the article is even supposed to help you with the gap fill or how to construct the writing?

    Thanks and good luck!
    Well first of all, remember you get a lot of time in this exam. I did the French version of this last year and I finished before the second hour began. So do take your time, and approach the paper at your own pace. In general, here's what I recommend you do on the paper:

    Listening

    Start off looking at the questions and figure out what they want you answer (how, what, why). Then make some predictions about what could be an answer if possible. Then listen to the extract twice without making notes, just get used to it as many people miss out on the important details. Then answer the questions. Make sure you listen out for the numbers and any negatives, since they trick many people into the wrong answer.

    The second part is a listening gapfill. This is a gentle exercise, and it's mostly based on common sense and grammar than actually listening to the extract itself. I recommend you just write the answers in then perhaps listen through to see if it makes sense.

    Reading and Grammar

    This is the probably the hardest part of the paper, since it's vocabulary specific. For 3a) questions, look at the tick boxes then consult the paper for answers, it will save a lot of time. You don't need to read the whole text thoroughly, just skim it for a general gist of what it's going on about. Remember to watch out for tricks though in the questions.

    3b) is normally quite challenging but thankfully it's only worth 4 marks (very little considering the paper). Remember to answer the command word (why, how, where) and keep your answer brief. All 'why' questions should be answered with porque. 'what' questions need only a word or two.

    3c) is a reading gapfill and is quite difficult but gets easier as you gather momentum. Start off reading the passage through two times to get the gist of it. Then look at the possible answers and make notes on what they mean. Look at the passage again and look at what type of word the gap suggests. Then go through elimination and do the ones you know first. If you get two words that are similar and could fit, refer to the text it's based on to get a clearer idea. Sometimes you get verbs that are similar too, remember to identify the person and tense it's been written in. Things like 'la gente quiere' are looking for a singular verb, not a plural like we would in English.

    Question 4 is not as heavy but it does solely depend on your grammar knowledge. Remember to identify the gender, tense and person and match that up with a possible solution. Be careful however, as false friends and subjunctives do pop up quite often. I recommend you go over the subjunctive, conditional, ser vs estar, por vs para, bien vs bueno, and 'lo' for a good chance at getting full marks in this section.

    Translations

    This is another hard question, and one that is work a lot of marks (more than the listening). The basic rule of translation is to make sure it makes sense, never literally translate the passage. I strongly recommend you get the texts side by side the answer booklet, since you really need to understand the context. Your translations are broken into chunks, which means you should still have a go if you're unsure about one word or phrase. You can practise this by simply looking at Spanish texts and having a go at translation. Learning vocabulary and common idioms (e.g vale la pena) will help you a lot here. Ultimately, make sure it makes sense in English.

    Essay

    The biggest question and it isn't that bad despite being the last part. Take your time on this, go a very relaxed pace and look at the titles. Brainstorm a few ideas on each title, note key vocabulary and points you could talk about. Decide which title you feel most comfortable with and draft a plan. Jot down any idioms, key vocabulary, tenses and a subjunctive phrase and refer to these as you write a sentence. Tick them off as you go through.

    I recommend you plan and write something like this:

    Introduction, - keep it brief, and make it very clear what title your answering, it puts you in the examiner's good books if you do that. A question or idiom is an easy way to get some marks here without exceeding the word count.

    Main paragraph - Say the point (smoking affects others) give an example or evidence (studies show thousands of children develop respiratory diseases from second hand smoking) and link it to the question title.

    (Do about 3-5 of these in total, make sure they express different views too. I like to get in-depth with my paragraphs and do 2 points for and 1 point against, but you can do it anyway you want.)

    Conclusion - Bring it all together with a concluding phrases, then answer the title here and justify your view.

    Cross out your plan, and you're done. Just refer to your plan, and see if you included all the tenses, vocab etc. Then read it through again slowly and check for any obvious errors.

    You'll probably have at least half an hour left to flick through the paper or simply chill for a bit if you want. Good luck!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Does anyone have past papers with listening files that they could put on here? In college we dont have access to them.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by serebro)
    Well first of all, remember you get a lot of time in this exam. I did the French version of this last year and I finished before the second hour began. So do take your time, and approach the paper at your own pace. In general, here's what I recommend you do on the paper:

    Listening

    Start off looking at the questions and figure out what they want you answer (how, what, why). Then make some predictions about what could be an answer if possible. Then listen to the extract twice without making notes, just get used to it as many people miss out on the important details. Then answer the questions. Make sure you listen out for the numbers and any negatives, since they trick many people into the wrong answer.

    The second part is a listening gapfill. This is a gentle exercise, and it's mostly based on common sense and grammar than actually listening to the extract itself. I recommend you just write the answers in then perhaps listen through to see if it makes sense.

    Reading and Grammar

    This is the probably the hardest part of the paper, since it's vocabulary specific. For 3a) questions, look at the tick boxes then consult the paper for answers, it will save a lot of time. You don't need to read the whole text thoroughly, just skim it for a general gist of what it's going on about. Remember to watch out for tricks though in the questions.

    3b) is normally quite challenging but thankfully it's only worth 4 marks (very little considering the paper). Remember to answer the command word (why, how, where) and keep your answer brief. All 'why' questions should be answered with porque. 'what' questions need only a word or two.

    3c) is a reading gapfill and is quite difficult but gets easier as you gather momentum. Start off reading the passage through two times to get the gist of it. Then look at the possible answers and make notes on what they mean. Look at the passage again and look at what type of word the gap suggests. Then go through elimination and do the ones you know first. If you get two words that are similar and could fit, refer to the text it's based on to get a clearer idea. Sometimes you get verbs that are similar too, remember to identify the person and tense it's been written in. Things like 'la gente quiere' are looking for a singular verb, not a plural like we would in English.

    Question 4 is not as heavy but it does solely depend on your grammar knowledge. Remember to identify the gender, tense and person and match that up with a possible solution. Be careful however, as false friends and subjunctives do pop up quite often. I recommend you go over the subjunctive, conditional, ser vs estar, por vs para, bien vs bueno, and 'lo' for a good chance at getting full marks in this section.

    Translations

    This is another hard question, and one that is work a lot of marks (more than the listening). The basic rule of translation is to make sure it makes sense, never literally translate the passage. I strongly recommend you get the texts side by side the answer booklet, since you really need to understand the context. Your translations are broken into chunks, which means you should still have a go if you're unsure about one word or phrase. You can practise this by simply looking at Spanish texts and having a go at translation. Learning vocabulary and common idioms (e.g vale la pena) will help you a lot here. Ultimately, make sure it makes sense in English.

    Essay

    The biggest question and it isn't that bad despite being the last part. Take your time on this, go a very relaxed pace and look at the titles. Brainstorm a few ideas on each title, note key vocabulary and points you could talk about. Decide which title you feel most comfortable with and draft a plan. Jot down any idioms, key vocabulary, tenses and a subjunctive phrase and refer to these as you write a sentence. Tick them off as you go through.

    I recommend you plan and write something like this:

    Introduction, - keep it brief, and make it very clear what title your answering, it puts you in the examiner's good books if you do that. A question or idiom is an easy way to get some marks here without exceeding the word count.

    Main paragraph - Say the point (smoking affects others) give an example or evidence (studies show thousands of children develop respiratory diseases from second hand smoking) and link it to the question title.

    (Do about 3-5 of these in total, make sure they express different views too. I like to get in-depth with my paragraphs and do 2 points for and 1 point against, but you can do it anyway you want.)

    Conclusion - Bring it all together with a concluding phrases, then answer the title here and justify your view.

    Cross out your plan, and you're done. Just refer to your plan, and see if you included all the tenses, vocab etc. Then read it through again slowly and check for any obvious errors.

    You'll probably have at least half an hour left to flick through the paper or simply chill for a bit if you want. Good luck!
    Wow, thanks a lot!!

    OK, so for the essay introduction would you recommend just something along the lines of "Hoy, voy a hablar de la opción a, y discutir mis razones de mi opinión sobre este tema"?

    I like the idea of making a point and linking it with evidence as well (I've been writing essays as all the positive, then all the negative reasons). What are the most important tenses other than obviously the good old subj. to include in the essay?
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shu003)
    Wow, thanks a lot!!

    OK, so for the essay introduction would you recommend just something along the lines of "Hoy, voy a hablar de la opción a, y discutir mis razones de mi opinión sobre este tema"?

    I like the idea of making a point and linking it with evidence as well (I've been writing essays as all the positive, then all the negative reasons). What are the most important tenses other than obviously the good old subj. to include in the essay?
    No problem.

    For an introduction I was try to make it slightly more general if I were you. Try plan a blueprint introduction and then mold it to suit the title of the essay.

    For example, if you had the question:


    “Las redes sociales y el ciberacoso son cada vez más peligrosos para los jóvenes hoy en día.” ¿Estás
    de acuerdo con esta afirmación? ¿Qué soluciones hay en tu opinión?

    I would probably have an intro like this:

    En nuesta sociedad moderna, hemos visto la aumenta de tecnología, incluidas las redes sociales. Esto ha creado consiguientemente problemas como el ciberacoso, particularmente con respecto a los jóvenes. En está redacción, discutiré si está tecnología es una verdadera amenaza para los jóvenes, y cómo resolveríamos estos problemas.
    It's not the best intro. It's 47 words which is just on the word count. However, within the first paragraph I have already introduced the future (discutiremos), conditional (resolveríamos), perfect present (hemos visto, ha creado) and the obvious present tense. It's also got 3 persons in it (we, I, it). I have also made it clear which title I'm answering. This will really help gather a lot of language, grammar and range marks, meaning I can focus more on getting my points clearly expressed and structured.

    I would avoid using the near future tense, e.g 'voy a discutir/hablar'. My native Spanish teacher says it's rather informal and seems a little too casual. It's great for spoken language but less so in written language. Plus if you use the future (discutiré, hablaré etc) it saves on the word count.

    Tense and mood-wise it's good to have the following:

    - Present past (ha sido, it has been)
    - Future
    - Perfect Past (like mostó que 'it showed that')
    - Conditional (podríamos is handy when talking about solutions)
    - Imperfect (you could use 'era' in your examples)
    - Subjunctive (learning a phrase will solve this easily)
    - Present

    Using around 5/7 of these will get you high marks in the range and grammar sections.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I have a question
    you know for the writing part of the exam where it says that we have to write 200-250 words on any of the questions, do they actually count the words? (sorry stupid question) lets say i wrote 271 would they cross out that much?? or 300- I'm really worried about this so could someone please explain this to me -.-*
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    I'm doing this exam on Tuesday and hopefully it'll go ok! I've done all of the past papers and learnt a lot of vocab from them, as well as going through false friends (there always seem to be there trying to catch people out.)

    I agree with serebro's post about everything and it was detailed and accurate! I would repeat that you should consider all of the essays before diving in - earlier on I did a past paper and thought that I would initially do one of the questions but then changed my mind after thinking that another one would work better.

    I usually use the introduction and conclusion to get in different tenses, e.g. in the introduction I usually use the imperfect tense to say what a situation was like in the past and try and get a set subjunctive phrase in that I always use, as well as the present tense (which I use a lot throughout the entire essay.) In the conclusion I like to use the future or conditional and sometimes the imperfect subjunctive.

    I really hope that the essay titles are nice this year! I know they're making them harder each year but as long as the topics are ones that I know well, it should be ok. I usually get between 32 and 34 for my essays so hopefully I can get that in the exam.

    I find question 3b the hardest with the short comprehension questions, but at least it's only 4 marks. I'm quite hit and miss with those and sometimes don't get the exact answer on the mark scheme - I think it really depends on what kind of questions they are as to if I do well or not..

    (Original post by Pnmshkr)
    I have a question
    you know for the writing part of the exam where it says that we have to write 200-250 words on any of the questions, do they actually count the words? (sorry stupid question) lets say i wrote 271 would they cross out that much?? or 300- I'm really worried about this so could someone please explain this to me -.-*
    I don't know if they would count exactly, but after marking so many papers, examiners can probably tell what looks about right. On the French examiner's reports it always says that you shouldn't write more than 280 words, so I guess the Spanish one will be the same.

    Having said that what really annoys me is that my teacher went to an examiner's meeting where the examiners were showing example essays. One of them got 34/35 and they must have written around 400 words yet the examiner said "well it was good anyway." But they're probably getting much stricter now so I would try and go for 280 maximum. I've found it useful to make a plan and get all of my ideas down before then deciding which points I want to make in my essay that would also fit into the limit.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dougieowner)
    I'm doing this exam on Tuesday and hopefully it'll go ok! I've done all of the past papers and learnt a lot of vocab from them, as well as going through false friends (there always seem to be there trying to catch people out.)

    I agree with serebro's post about everything and it was detailed and accurate! I would repeat that you should consider all of the essays before diving in - earlier on I did a past paper and thought that I would initially do one of the questions but then changed my mind after thinking that another one would work better.

    I usually use the introduction and conclusion to get in different tenses, e.g. in the introduction I usually use the imperfect tense to say what a situation was like in the past and try and get a set subjunctive phrase in that I always use, as well as the present tense (which I use a lot throughout the entire essay.) In the conclusion I like to use the future or conditional and sometimes the imperfect subjunctive.

    I really hope that the essay titles are nice this year! I know they're making them harder each year but as long as the topics are ones that I know well, it should be ok. I usually get between 32 and 34 for my essays so hopefully I can get that in the exam.

    I find question 3b the hardest with the short comprehension questions, but at least it's only 4 marks. I'm quite hit and miss with those and sometimes don't get the exact answer on the mark scheme - I think it really depends on what kind of questions they are as to if I do well or not..



    I don't know if they would count exactly, but after marking so many papers, examiners can probably tell what looks about right. On the French examiner's reports it always says that you shouldn't write more than 280 words, so I guess the Spanish one will be the same.

    Having said that what really annoys me is that my teacher went to an examiner's meeting where the examiners were showing example essays. One of them got 34/35 and they must have written around 400 words yet the examiner said "well it was good anyway." But they're probably getting much stricter now so I would try and go for 280 maximum. I've found it useful to make a plan and get all of my ideas down before then deciding which points I want to make in my essay that would also fit into the limit.
    Hii!! Can you please post the past papers on this page please?? I have no access to them id really appreciate it if you could!
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pnmshkr)
    I have a question
    you know for the writing part of the exam where it says that we have to write 200-250 words on any of the questions, do they actually count the words? (sorry stupid question) lets say i wrote 271 would they cross out that much?? or 300- I'm really worried about this so could someone please explain this to me -.-*
    No, they don't literally count the words as far as I'm aware. Since they have a lot of experience marking these essays, they roughly know the word count as they go through it.

    Generally, you can go over slightly (280 max.) but it's simply best to cross out some of your essay. Don't cross out any good language expressions nor any use of tenses. Perhaps eliminate a sentence or two. If you plan in detail beforehand, you are a lot less likely to go over. Personally, I like to write 50 words per paragraph, it gives you enough space to give some detail, while also allowing you get about 3 main points in the essay.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    oh okay then thanks- one less problem to deal with- thanks for replying quickly (both of you) my teacher gave me a plan so hopefully i'll be able to do it properly. I like WJEC but these examiners do really annoy me- for the word count reason and also the fact that we can't access all the documents like with other exam boards :P but hey they have their reasons.
    Thank you guys so much
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pnmshkr)
    oh okay then thanks- one less problem to deal with- thanks for replying quickly (both of you) my teacher gave me a plan so hopefully i'll be able to do it properly. I like WJEC but these examiners do really annoy me- for the word count reason and also the fact that we can't access all the documents like with other exam boards :P but hey they have their reasons.
    Thank you guys so much
    And the fact they keep trying to catch you out on this one!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Anybody know of any good/idiomatic phrases to start each paragraph of with? I feel this may help me gain higher marks.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by anorris13)
    Anybody know of any good/idiomatic phrases to start each paragraph of with? I feel this may help me gain higher marks.
    I've been using similar phrases that I was using for my oral, such as "se supone que"(one assumes that), "no cabe duda que"(there's no doubt that) and "desde mi punto de vista"(from my point of view). I suppose you can conjugate these inti any tense you want
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by anorris13)
    Anybody know of any good/idiomatic phrases to start each paragraph of with? I feel this may help me gain higher marks.
    (Original post by shu003)
    I've been using similar phrases that I was using for my oral, such as "se supone que"(one assumes that), "no cabe duda que"(there's no doubt that) and "desde mi punto de vista"(from my point of view). I suppose you can conjugate these inti any tense you want
    As far as idioms go (I have plenty of other expressions for essays which are great but I wouldn't call the others idioms as such) :
    Vale la pena - it's worth it
    Llevar a cabo - to carry out
    Darse la cuenta - to realise (NOT REALIZAR)
    Soler : suelo (pres.) - to usually do something ( instead of using "normalmente")
    solia (imp.)
    Acabar de - to have just
    Tener ganas de - to feel like doing something
    Andarse con rodeos -beating around the bush
    tarde o temprano - sooner or later
    Al fin y al cabo/ a fin de cuentas - "When all's said and done"
    Cabe preguntarse - One must question oneself
    Ni que decir tiene que - It goes without saying that

    These are just a few of the expressions I have.

    Anybody have any more idiomatic ones?

    May I also point you guys towards these very helpful threads:

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...ssay%20phrases

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2320896
    (THERE'S A GREAT SPANISH DOC. FOR PHRASES AT THE END OF THIS ONE ^^^)

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1482018


    Also don't forget :
    Ser bueno & Estar Bien
    There is NO word efectar; only AFECTAR
    Un afecto - love/affection but un efecto - an effect
    If you are doing something to a person, or group of people, there will be an "a" e.g fomentar a la gente
    El bien - the good (e.g the good of humanity)
    Siempre que does NOT take subjunctive


    I was wondering whether someone could give me some insight into those adjectives which change after a noun, but not if they are before it ?!?!?! E.g when would you write "mal" if its' before a noun and when "malo/a" before a noun.

    Also for subjunctive some quick phrases are:
    Que yo sepa - as far as I know
    Sea como sea - whatever the case

    Buena suerte!

    Creo que es una buena idea si todos compartimos toda la informacion que sabemos en cuanto al examen. :-) :-) :-)

    Also has anyone got any tips for the translation because that is ALWAYS the part I lose the most marks on! And also for the listening sometimes I correct little nuances and my teacher says the statement was actually right. Does anyone have any tips for how wrong a statement should be in order to have to fix it?

    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I found this good website with idioms!

    http://www.123teachme.com/learn_span...ic_expressions
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    How did everyone find the exam?

    I think it was ok overall - on the translation I didn't know certain things so I guessed (even though they're wrong), so I'm scared that I'll have lost quite a few marks. I forgot what "habilidades docentes" (teaching skills) was, which is stupid since it seems really obvious now, and I initially wrote "bastantes" as "enough" (which is correct) but I think I later changed it to something else which I'm so annoyed about - I always seem to change stuff that was actually correct! I also don't know if my phrasing was very good...

    But the essay was ok! I did the one about sport since it was similar to one I'd done before and I think what I wrote was fairly accurate, so hopefully I'll get good marks on that.

    I liked the gap fill and I think I successfully managed to work out what the missing words were, and the listening wasn't too bad. There was one that I was a little unsure of as I thought I was inferring something that I didn't hear. It was the one about exercise and it said something about "doing a little bit of exercise from time to time." I said it was false and put something about doing exercise regularly, but I don't know if that's what it was saying...

    I might try and give myself a pessimistic predicted score later...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey Dougieowner.

    I took this AS exam today as a re-take as I got a B last year. I have a place at university next year to do languages however, I found this paper fairly challenging.

    Translations were difficult because of the sheer amount of marks for most of them.

    Did you take this for a re-take or AS?

    I also felt that the gapfill was difficult in comparison to last years actual AS which I sat and got full marks.

    Liam
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    (Original post by liam8040)
    Hey Dougieowner.

    I took this AS exam today as a re-take as I got a B last year. I have a place at university next year to do languages however, I found this paper fairly challenging.

    Translations were difficult because of the sheer amount of marks for most of them.

    Did you take this for a re-take or AS?

    I also felt that the gapfill was difficult in comparison to last years actual AS which I sat and got full marks.

    Liam
    I'm doing this as AS for the first time

    The translations were a bit irritating - I know that I'll have got maybe parts of sentences correct but because I didn't know one word, I'll have lost marks because of that. They were also fairly long translations (I also do French, and in the French paper the translations were short, to the point and the vocab needed also seemed to be easier...)

    I think some of the gap fill this time required you to actually read the article (even though it's always helpful to do so anyway, on some of the papers in the past it was possible work everything out from grammar alone.) So I guess it was maybe more challenging as you needed to understand things? However I think I maybe did better than the mock exam (the exam you would have sat last year) just because I've practised a lot more since then, but I can see what you mean.

    Would you say that this year's paper was harder overall?
 
 
 
Poll
Cats or dogs?
Help with your A-levels

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Rosette

Essay expert

Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

Uni match

Uni match

Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

Study planner

Create a study plan

Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

Study planner

Resources by subject

Everything from mind maps to class notes.

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student doing homework

Study tips from A* students

Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

Study help links and info

Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.