how is history gcse different to a.s history?

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Sam54321
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how is history gcse different to a.s history? Is it similar or different? If different please explain. Thankyou!
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For me it was quite different.

Although the learning/teaching methods were similar, the content was very different. At GCSE we did different topics in different periods of time in different places in the world. At AS we did German and British Politics in similar time periods (although the start/end years of the topics were slightly different in each unit). There was also no coursework in AS (we did two at A2 instead).

One of the exams (the German one) was a source analysis, which was similar to our Vietnam coursework at GCSE. The other was a classic GCSE-style essay (I think). Although the time periods we studied were only 50 years long, the questions were very focused on specific moments of the period (and it gets worse at A2!).

But I'm glad I took it because I love it even more now than I did at GCSE!
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Sam54321
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(Original post by Paparazzo)
For me it was quite different.

Although the learning/teaching methods were similar, the content was very different. At GCSE we did different topics in different periods of time in different places in the world. At AS we did German and British Politics in similar time periods (although the start/end years of the topics were slightly different in each unit). There was also no coursework in AS (we did two at A2 instead).

One of the exams (the German one) was a source analysis, which was similar to our Vietnam coursework at GCSE. The other was a classic GCSE-style essay (I think). Although the time periods we studied were only 50 years long, the questions were very focused on specific moments of the period (and it gets worse at A2!).

But I'm glad I took it because I love it even more now than I did at GCSE!
Does not seem too bad. Me too I love history, but here is the thing. I never picked history for gcse (Picked Geography instead wohoo) So do you still think I can do well - like get an A as As? Currently I am an A/A* sudent if it helps. I was wondering is it really hard, like compared to other subjects like Chemistry, Physics and maths oreven to gcse history? Is is the history course time consuming, hard to get marks, high grade boundaries. Is it fundamental to have the skills from gcse to As because I never had the chance to really use them or develop them greatly in the passed two years.

Sorry for the questions, really important to know.

Also if it is eassy writing? How many essays to do u have to write, like to keep up? Also what type of essay? Like you analyse a source. I never really have done that so doing that would be new. Nice to know now so i can understand and practice before September comes.
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(Original post by Sam54321)
Does not seem too bad. Me too I love history, but here is the thing. I never picked history for gcse (Picked Geography instead wohoo) So do you still think I can do well - like get an A as As?
One girl in my class didn't do History at GCSE and she's on track to get an A (overall). I think she got an A in AS. It's very possible to do.

Currently I am an A/A* sudent if it helps. I was wondering is it really hard, like compared to other subjects like Chemistry, Physics and maths oreven to gcse history?
I foolishly took Chemistry at AS and it was ridiculously harder than it was at GCSE. Not trying to scare you, but I went from an A at GCSE to an E at A-Level. But that's just because it wasn't for me. Despite how it was at GCSE, it is a big jump to A-Level and nobody can honestly say how you'll do because it's so personal. On the contrary, I got A* at History GCSE and am hoping to keep up that trend when my results come in the summer! They have their own challenges in their own ways.

Is is the history course time consuming
Not really. We got set one essay a week for each side of the course (Nazi Germany and British Politics). We were instructed to keep in timed conditions (which I rarely tried to do), so that's about 2 hours or so a week.

hard to get marks
It's hard to get marks if you don't know what you're doing. At AS we had two exams, one which was a source analysis and the other was a straight essay. Answering them was similar in some ways, but vastly different in others. It's all about learning your technique early (your teacher will help you with this! It's not something you have to do yourself, other than practice and understand it) so that you get lots of practice.

high grade boundaries
That's impossible to say. It depends each year, depending on how hard the paper was/how the results were.

Is it fundamental to have the skills from gcse to As because I never had the chance to really use them or develop them greatly in the passed two years.
Not really. As long as you can make links between events (i.e. x caused z to happen, but y also had some influence), comparisons (x was more important than y in causing z to happen because...) and so on, then you don't really need anything more. Again, this is something that your teachers will help you with (and something you probably did in other lessons at GCSE. But the ability to write well is important, so being good at English is helpful (but not 100%).

Like you analyse a source. I never really have done that so doing that would be new. Nice to know now so i can understand and practice before September comes.
It depends on what your exam board is. Mine is OCR. Here's a link to the past papers, to give you an idea of what you'll face:

Source analysis:

http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/144503-...-1774-1975.pdf

Straight essay:

http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/144497-...-1783-1994.pdf




If you have anymore questions or want any help, just give me a shout.
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jjmichaeljadson
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Like the poster above me has said, it doesn't matter if you didn't do History at GCSE. My friend also did not do History but is slightly better than me at AS, and I got almost full marks at GCSE.
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Omni Vanitas
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(Original post by Paparazzo)
One girl in my class didn't do History at GCSE and she's on track to get an A (overall). I think she got an A in AS. It's very possible to do.



I foolishly took Chemistry at AS and it was ridiculously harder than it was at GCSE. Not trying to scare you, but I went from an A at GCSE to an E at A-Level. But that's just because it wasn't for me. Despite how it was at GCSE, it is a big jump to A-Level and nobody can honestly say how you'll do because it's so personal. On the contrary, I got A* at History GCSE and am hoping to keep up that trend when my results come in the summer! They have their own challenges in their own ways.



Not really. We got set one essay a week for each side of the course (Nazi Germany and British Politics). We were instructed to keep in timed conditions (which I rarely tried to do), so that's about 2 hours or so a week.



It's hard to get marks if you don't know what you're doing. At AS we had two exams, one which was a source analysis and the other was a straight essay. Answering them was similar in some ways, but vastly different in others. It's all about learning your technique early (your teacher will help you with this! It's not something you have to do yourself, other than practice and understand it) so that you get lots of practice.



That's impossible to say. It depends each year, depending on how hard the paper was/how the results were.



Not really. As long as you can make links between events (i.e. x caused z to happen, but y also had some influence), comparisons (x was more important than y in causing z to happen because...) and so on, then you don't really need anything more. Again, this is something that your teachers will help you with (and something you probably did in other lessons at GCSE. But the ability to write well is important, so being good at English is helpful (but not 100%).



It depends on what your exam board is. Mine is OCR. Here's a link to the past papers, to give you an idea of what you'll face:

Source analysis:

http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/144503-...-1774-1975.pdf

Straight essay:

http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/144497-...-1783-1994.pdf




If you have anymore questions or want any help, just give me a shout.
Thanks for this
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arfah
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(Original post by Sam54321)
how is history gcse different to a.s history? Is it similar or different? If different please explain. Thankyou!
Very different AS is far more interesting, you learn a lot more and I love it! you should pick AS history!!You won't regret it lol
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Sam54321
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(Original post by Paparazzo)
One girl in my class didn't do History at GCSE and she's on track to get an A (overall). I think she got an A in AS. It's very possible to do.



I foolishly took Chemistry at AS and it was ridiculously harder than it was at GCSE. Not trying to scare you, but I went from an A at GCSE to an E at A-Level. But that's just because it wasn't for me. Despite how it was at GCSE, it is a big jump to A-Level and nobody can honestly say how you'll do because it's so personal. On the contrary, I got A* at History GCSE and am hoping to keep up that trend when my results come in the summer! They have their own challenges in their own ways.



Not really. We got set one essay a week for each side of the course (Nazi Germany and British Politics). We were instructed to keep in timed conditions (which I rarely tried to do), so that's about 2 hours or so a week.



It's hard to get marks if you don't know what you're doing. At AS we had two exams, one which was a source analysis and the other was a straight essay. Answering them was similar in some ways, but vastly different in others. It's all about learning your technique early (your teacher will help you with this! It's not something you have to do yourself, other than practice and understand it) so that you get lots of practice.



That's impossible to say. It depends each year, depending on how hard the paper was/how the results were.



Not really. As long as you can make links between events (i.e. x caused z to happen, but y also had some influence), comparisons (x was more important than y in causing z to happen because...) and so on, then you don't really need anything more. Again, this is something that your teachers will help you with (and something you probably did in other lessons at GCSE. But the ability to write well is important, so being good at English is helpful (but not 100%).



It depends on what your exam board is. Mine is OCR. Here's a link to the past papers, to give you an idea of what you'll face:

Source analysis:

http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/144503-...-1774-1975.pdf

Straight essay:

http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/144497-...-1783-1994.pdf




If you have anymore questions or want any help, just give me a shout.

OMG you are a genius! I love whoever you are, probably the best advice I have had! Thankyou
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jwf13
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Just thought I could chip in:

The first difference is the increase in content and length of exam questions. The source paper has fewer questions worth more marks, as does the factors/knowledge/evaluation paper. You also cover two places/time periods in more depth instead of four. The assessment is pretty similar though for the knowledge- you get marks for PEE, but you need more specific knowledge and there are more marks for evaluation. The source paper extends knowledge from bits of the AS paper- cross referencing makes up a large part of it (which builds on comparison questions) and you've also got to tie-in your own knowledge with source interpretation. I would also say that, generally, the people who did really well in GCSE History (ie A*s/As) also do very well at AS (A/B/C) because the skills are pretty similar. I nearly didn't do AS History (I switched from Drama a week before the deadline) but I'm glad I did- it's very interesting and although challenging I've loved it


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Sam54321
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(Original post by jwf13)
Just thought I could chip in:

The first difference is the increase in content and length of exam questions. The source paper has fewer questions worth more marks, as does the factors/knowledge/evaluation paper. You also cover two places/time periods in more depth instead of four. The assessment is pretty similar though for the knowledge- you get marks for PEE, but you need more specific knowledge and there are more marks for evaluation. The source paper extends knowledge from bits of the AS paper- cross referencing makes up a large part of it (which builds on comparison questions) and you've also got to tie-in your own knowledge with source interpretation. I would also say that, generally, the people who did really well in GCSE History (ie A*s/As) also do very well at AS (A/B/C) because the skills are pretty similar. I nearly didn't do AS History (I switched from Drama a week before the deadline) but I'm glad I did- it's very interesting and although challenging I've loved it


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Thankyou!
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Seeker_SM
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(Original post by Sam54321)
how is history gcse different to a.s history? Is it similar or different? If different please explain. Thankyou!

Ive down OCR history and yes I would argue they're very different! Its much harder at Alevel as you must be able to write elegantly and prove your points for you to get top marks. I would say yes you can do it if you haven't done GCSE history. I would also say it was my most time consuming subject having taken chem, maths, biology and history. For you to do well u need a good overall knowledge of the period/country you're studying so lots of notes, background reading and essays. its a subject where you're definitely rewarded for your hard work and is NOT a memory test! Good luck with whatever you choose ;-)
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