A level Chemistry and Physics without maths? Watch

j5994
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Hi,
I've heard a lot about people failing A level phys and chem if they don't do maths A level too. I'm on a solid A at GCSE maths (idk how haha) but like if I do these 2 subjects without maths, will I find it very difficult?

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Chlorophile
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(Original post by j5994)
Hi,
I've heard a lot about people failing A level phys and chem if they don't do maths A level too. I'm on a solid A at GCSE maths (idk how haha) but like if I do these 2 subjects without maths, will I find it very difficult?

Cheers
To the best of my knowledge, there's nothing in A Level Physics or Chemistry that requires a knowledge of Maths beyond GCSE. However, doing A Level Maths definitely does help, simply because it gives you a lot more confidence with dealing with equations and stuff. Especially with Physics, it's easier with Maths. Having said that, they're definitely possible without it.
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Gax
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(Original post by j5994)
Hi,
I've heard a lot about people failing A level phys and chem if they don't do maths A level too. I'm on a solid A at GCSE maths (idk how haha) but like if I do these 2 subjects without maths, will I find it very difficult?

Cheers
I do Maths, Physics and Chemistry and there are definitely a few things in both that require A level Maths. Logarithms and simple Mechanics, for example. I know people in both my Chemistry and Physics classes who struggle quite a lot because they don't do Maths.

Then again, they might just be rubbish at maths so if you're fully confident in your maths abilities then you might not find it too hard.
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j5994
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(Original post by Chlorophile)
To the best of my knowledge, there's nothing in A Level Physics or Chemistry that requires a knowledge of Maths beyond GCSE. However, doing A Level Maths definitely does help, simply because it gives you a lot more confidence with dealing with equations and stuff. Especially with Physics, it's easier with Maths. Having said that, they're definitely possible without it.
Thanks, I'm guessing A level Physics is a huge step up from GCSE physics haha, the equations are so basic.
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j5994
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(Original post by Gax)
I do Maths, Physics and Chemistry and there are definitely a few things in both that require A level Maths. Logarithms and simple Mechanics, for example. I know people in both my Chemistry and Physics classes who struggle quite a lot because they don't do Maths.

Then again, they might just be rubbish at maths so if you're fully confident in your maths abilities then you might not find it too hard.
thanks, do you reckon self teaching up to AS maths would be of benefit?
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Gax
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(Original post by j5994)
thanks, do you reckon self teaching up to AS maths would be of benefit?
Yea yea of course. It's only a few principles that you need. It also depends on the exam boards (I'm doing Edexcel Maths and Physics and OCR B Chemistry). Also, the aptitude of your teacher matters quite a lot. Other than that, you should be fine.

Here's a good link for Core 1 Maths (Edexcel) that should help: http://www.examsolutions.net/maths-r.../C1/module.php
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Petulia
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You usually need a B in GCSE Maths to be allowed to study A Level Chemistry and Physics. I just about scraped a B in GCSE Maths (it was my worst subject) and I do struggle with the calculations in Chemistry sometimes.
However, I know people who study Maths and say that it doesn't help with Chemistry because the types of calculations are completely different.
If you can get in A in GCSE Maths then I think you'll be able to cope with Chemistry. The calculations in Chemistry are more about just remembering different formulas and knowing how to apply them, but there's only about 4 or 5 main ones that I can think of.
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ThatPerson
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(Original post by j5994)
Thanks, I'm guessing A level Physics is a huge step up from GCSE physics haha, the equations are so basic.
Since A-Level Physics & Chemistry were designed so that A-Level Maths is not required in order to do them successfully, the equations are still basic, although there is a lot more calculations on papers compared to GCSE.

I do recommend Maths A-Level because it does go nicely with Physics and Chemistry, particularly for any related careers and degrees, although you don't have to.
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ellie_finch
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(Original post by j5994)
Hi,
I've heard a lot about people failing A level phys and chem if they don't do maths A level too. I'm on a solid A at GCSE maths (idk how haha) but like if I do these 2 subjects without maths, will I find it very difficult?

Cheers
I dropped maths after GCSE as I found it repetitive and quite hard, though I revised like crazy and got an A* (just ). But I continued with both Chemistry and Physics and love them. Occasionally I find some of the physics in AS a little more challenging than everyone else (as they all do AS maths) but Chemistry is fine. Sometimes it just requires going over things again with my teachers, who are more than happy to explain things again, or doing a little extra work at home. Providing my AS results are okay, not doing maths will not obstruct me from continuing Physics and Chemistry on to A2. Hope this helped!
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Tillybop
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(Original post by j5994)
Hi,
I've heard a lot about people failing A level phys and chem if they don't do maths A level too. I'm on a solid A at GCSE maths (idk how haha) but like if I do these 2 subjects without maths, will I find it very difficult?

Cheers
I didn't do maths in my first year of physics A level, and I did well, but I found I struggled to grasp the mathematical concepts more than those who did maths. In my second year of physics I did maths as well, and found it much easier.

You probably won't fail physics or chemistry without maths, but you might find it easier if you have maths as well.

Both chemistry and physics A2 require logs and some other maths that isn't in GCSE.
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j5994
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(Original post by Gax)
Yea yea of course. It's only a few principles that you need. It also depends on the exam boards (I'm doing Edexcel Maths and Physics and OCR B Chemistry). Also, the aptitude of your teacher matters quite a lot. Other than that, you should be fine.

Here's a good link for Core 1 Maths (Edexcel) that should help: http://www.examsolutions.net/maths-r.../C1/module.php
thanks for the link, is AS maths a big jump from GCSE?


(Original post by ellie_finch)
I dropped maths after GCSE as I found it repetitive and quite hard, though I revised like crazy and got an A* (just ). But I continued with both Chemistry and Physics and love them. Occasionally I find some of the physics in AS a little more challenging than everyone else (as they all do AS maths) but Chemistry is fine. Sometimes it just requires going over things again with my teachers, who are more than happy to explain things again, or doing a little extra work at home. Providing my AS results are okay, not doing maths will not obstruct me from continuing Physics and Chemistry on to A2. Hope this helped!
Yeah it did thanks


(Original post by Petulia)
You usually need a B in GCSE Maths to be allowed to study A Level Chemistry and Physics. I just about scraped a B in GCSE Maths (it was my worst subject) and I do struggle with the calculations in Chemistry sometimes.
However, I know people who study Maths and say that it doesn't help with Chemistry because the types of calculations are completely different.
If you can get in A in GCSE Maths then I think you'll be able to cope with Chemistry. The calculations in Chemistry are more about just remembering different formulas and knowing how to apply them, but there's only about 4 or 5 main ones that I can think of.
aight, did u find the content interesting btw?
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Nymthae
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Chemistry mostly required confidence and basic competence in maths. If you understand the idea behind equations, can rearrange equations, and use any given equations then you're set for AS. People who do maths don't always understand because they don't really click with the maths even still, so don't do it if it's not for you. A2 required more mathematical aspects as it all became about rates, equilibria etc. all the physical chemistry aspects - which are mathematical. Logarithms are the only thing you'll cover (in AS maths) with direct application which you'll then need (in A2 chem) but your teacher will and should teach the basic idea behind them/what you need to know because not everybody does maths. Everything else is just equation manipulation and rearranging.

What are you intending to do beyond A-levels? because both chemistry and physics themselves tend to lead into routes requiring decent maths backgrounds (as a word of warning).
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1724abc
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I don't take chem but I'm currently taking maths and physics (AS that is) and I can honestly say I wouldn't be able to even pass physics if I wasn't taking maths. It helps in general with being able to arrange equations but it helps immensely with mechanics which is studied in both subjects. I also find in physics a mathematical approach to a lot of the course is preferable.


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Lewisallows
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It's not necessary, but I think it definitely helps. At A level the mathematical content in physics increases so much that if you're not very comfortable with doing maths, I think you might struggle - Could be wrong since I don't know you.
I do maths, physics and chemistry and doing maths has helped with me with physics A LOT throughout the past year.
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Gax
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(Original post by j5994)
is AS maths a big jump from GCSE?
I think it depends on how much you learned at GCSE. For me it wasn't a lot (even though I got an A) so I found AS level maths quite challenging at first (Core 1, that is). However, I started getting the hang of it after that and started settling in. The other 2 modules I did for AS were Core 2 and Statistics 1.

If you learned a decent amount at GCSE then the jump shouldn't be too much for you. Especially if you use examsolutions.net. It was only after I found out about it that things started getting easier for me :P
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