AviationIsMyLife
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I been wanting to become an RAF pilot for so long and I know it be really difficult, but I'm not giving up and i willing to do anything and everything to achieve me goal, I love flying,adventures and challenges. This year I'll be joining the Air Cadet and I was wondering, If you join the cadets and learn to fly and everything to become an officer(well, not really like that but you get my meaning), will the RAF see that you got potential and are very commitment. Can the Air Cadets gives help and support me toward my one and only commitment? It would be great help, Thanks you.
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Xyloid
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(Original post by AviationIsMyLife)
I been wanting to become an RAF pilot for so long and I know it be really difficult, but I'm not giving up and i willing to do anything and everything to achieve me goal, I love flying,adventures and challenges. This year I'll be joining the Air Cadet and I was wondering, If you join the cadets and learn to fly and everything to become an officer(well, not really like that but you get my meaning), will the RAF see that you got potential and are very commitment. Can the Air Cadets gives help and support me toward my one and only commitment? It would be great help, Thanks you.
Have you done anything towards being a Pilot so far ?

Are you sure you can become one for the RAF ? It's very strict, if you've ever had Asthma they wont consider you and even Hayfever something they're strict on.

I'm not amazingly clued up on the RAF, having had child asthma myself it was never an option, but I do believe the Air Cadets can help with flight training.

It is incredibly difficult to become an RAF pilot in the present day, especially with all the budget cuts. There also tends to be an age limit (I believe 25 if my mind serves me correctly ?).

Does Commercial Aviation capture your fancy at all ? Fire questions at me if it does.
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theblackparade
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The air cadets give massive support at the squadron I'm at to cadets who wish to join the RAF in the future. I've been a member of the ATC for over 3 years now and the opportunities are not only amazing but also prepare you for military life. Annual camps are the best for preparing you for military life and speaking from experience they can certainly be a challenge but have been the highlight of my cadet career. Realistically if your looking to join the RAF after cadets being promoted is always something the recruitment officers look at so it's best to try and get promoted to at least sgt. Also although you can learn to fly places are quite competitive and you will obviously be flying aircraft 1000X more sophisticated as a pilot in the RAF so it doesn't give you a huge advantage over other applicants. All in all, recruitment officers do see the cadets as a +1 on your application as you're much more prepared for what your career as a pilot will entail.

Edit: also as my sister wishes to be a pilot she is very well informed on future recruitment and I believe at some point in the next few years they will be recruiting a set amount of pilots annually but do remember RAF pilots don't get many flying hours. Recently I was on a VC10 that had 12000 miles on it.

Hope that helps
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Jaydude
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(Original post by Xyloid)
Have you done anything towards being a Pilot so far ?

Are you sure you can become one for the RAF ? It's very strict, if you've ever had Asthma they wont consider you and even Hayfever something they're strict on.

I'm not amazingly clued up on the RAF, having had child asthma myself it was never an option, but I do believe the Air Cadets can help with flight training.

It is incredibly difficult to become an RAF pilot in the present day, especially with all the budget cuts. There also tends to be an age limit (I believe 25 if my mind serves me correctly ?).

Does Commercial Aviation capture your fancy at all ? Fire questions at me if it does.
Do you have experience or great knowledge in the commercial aviation? Can you tell me (or us) more about it?

Eg how people get into the industry, what they did to get in, their qualifications etc. thanks! (Sorry to hijack this thread OP!)


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Jamespugh00
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I've been an air cadet for 2 years, it will show to the RAF that you already have a knowledge of the RAF and the practices i.e. Drill and discipline, it will show to them that you are committed are interested in joining the RAF, also, a lot of the time careers officers will come into the cadets and talk to you and give you advice. However, the most important thing will still remain your grades and qualifications so work hard and try your best in school and college. If you don't get accepted into the RAF, there is a lot of flying careers in the royal navy and its a lot easier to get into than the RAF, hope this helps.
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Zeroic
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lol at air cadets, all you guys do is march.

only joking, but seriously dont you guys have to be in atc for around 4 years before even considering, anyway I've gotta tell you out of 33k only 600 are actually pilots in the raf

if you got glasses then it's a no, air cadets is a okay thing to put down, but grades and intelligence in my opinion are far more surperior, the governments not going to let you on the multi milllion pound plane just because you were a cadet
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AviationIsMyLife
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(Original post by Jamespugh00)
I've been an air cadet for 2 years, it will show to the RAF that you already have a knowledge of the RAF and the practices i.e. Drill and discipline, it will show to them that you are committed are interested in joining the RAF, also, a lot of the time careers officers will come into the cadets and talk to you and give you advice. However, the most important thing will still remain your grades and qualifications so work hard and try your best in school and college. If you don't get accepted into the RAF, there is a lot of flying careers in the royal navy and its a lot easier to get into than the RAF, hope this helps.
Thanks you for your help, but I was wondering, if I do BTEC in Aviation Studies and Public Service, will this count as qualification to them(RAF)?
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AviationIsMyLife
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(Original post by Jaydude)
Do you have experience or great knowledge in the commercial aviation? Can you tell me (or us) more about it?

Eg how people get into the industry, what they did to get in, their qualifications etc. thanks! (Sorry to hijack this thread OP!)


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Hi, The usual qualifications needed to begin training as a pilot are a minimum of five GCSEs and two A-levels. A degree or postgraduate qualification is not required although some people may choose to take one to make them stand out in the tough competition.Buckinghamshire New University offers a BA in Air Transport with Commercial Pilot Training but this degree is not essential to become an airline pilot.
The training to become a pilot requires a good level of understanding of maths and physics and so any qualifications that demonstrate this may be of an advantage.
In order to work as an airline pilot you must hold an Airline Transport Pilot Licence (ATPL). This qualification is known as a 'frozen ATPL' and becomes 'unfrozen' when a certain number of hours and experience have been achieved.
The two main ways to achieve an ATPL are via the following courses:

  • Integrated course - an intensive full-time course, which takes around 18 months to complete. This course is carried out with a flight training provider and is a mixture of classroom theory work and practical flying. No previous experience is required for this route, with training providers taking students from zero hours of flying up to the required amount for the ATPL.
  • Modular training - this is offered by the same training providers and covers the same topics and examinations as the integrated route, but is carried out in chunks which can be completed with breaks in between. The theory side of the course can be completed as a full-time classroom course or as a distance learning course to allow the student to work at the same time. The modular training may be more appealing to those students who cannot afford the more expensive integrated course (which can cost from £80,000-£90,000) as they are able to complete sections as they can afford them and work in between if needed. To carry out the modular route the student must already hold a private pilot licence and have completed 150 hours of flying before starting the practical flying aspect of the course. Although a cheaper option, the modular route is still expensive and involves more self-study.

A full list of approved training providers can be found at CAA Approved Courses of Flight and Ground Training .
Full or part sponsorship from an airline which pays for the student's training is sometimes available, but usually only when the aviation industry is doing well and there is a high demand for pilots. It may be difficult to find such opportunities while the industry is still trying to recover its growth since the recession. When sponsorship opportunities are available, competition is extremely fierce.
Required skills for an airline pilot include:

  • an understanding of maths and physics;
  • an ability to understand technical information, as pilots need to know how their aircraft works;
  • excellent spatial awareness and coordination;
  • good communication skills;
  • team-working skills
  • the ability to think quickly and make decisions in difficult situations;
  • the ability to remain calm under pressure
  • discipline, self-confidence and commitment;
  • leadership skills, with the ability to give clear commands to cabin crew and passengers.

It is highly recommended that before you begin any training you take the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) Class One Medical. It is a requirement that all airline pilots pass this medical, and if you do not, you will not be able to complete the training to achieve the ATPL. It is therefore a good idea to take this before paying out on the expensive course fees. The medical is available at the CAA medical unit at Gatwick.
The Guild of Air Pilots and Navigators (GAPAN) provides an aptitude test, which is useful for those with little or no flying experience to see if they may be suited to a career as a pilot.
It is also possible for those who have trained as pilots in the RAF, Navy and Army to become commercial airline pilots. To do so, a civil aviation course must be completed and a conversion qualification should be gained.

Hope this help
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Schleigg
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(Original post by theblackparade)
do remember RAF pilots don't get many flying hours. Recently I was on a VC10 that had 12000 miles on it.
RAF Pilots get plenty of flying hours...

It's unlikely that a VC10 would only have 12,000 miles on it, not only because aircraft don't measure their age/ fatigue in miles but secondly 12,000 miles barely gets you once round the world
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Drewski
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(Original post by AviationIsMyLife)
I been wanting to become an RAF pilot for so long and I know it be really difficult, but I'm not giving up and i willing to do anything and everything to achieve me goal, I love flying,adventures and challenges. This year I'll be joining the Air Cadet and I was wondering, If you join the cadets and learn to fly and everything to become an officer(well, not really like that but you get my meaning), will the RAF see that you got potential and are very commitment. Can the Air Cadets gives help and support me toward my one and only commitment? It would be great help, Thanks you.
There is much much more to it than that, but basically, yes. If you're just joining the cdts now I'm going to guess you're around the 13/14 mark. Time is on your side. You can't join until you are at least 18, more like 21/22 to be realistic.
Can the ATC do a lot for you? Sure. But you have to do it too.
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Fritz Bollinger
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(Original post by Schleigg)
It's unlikely that a VC10 would only have 12,000 miles on it, not only because aircraft don't measure their age/ fatigue in miles but secondly 12,000 miles barely gets you once round the world
Taxying odometer...:colone:


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jannisjr
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The cadets is great, I count it as amongst the best thing I ever did during my school life (I was a late joiner upon advice from the careers office).

Be aware though, what it gives you is EXPOSURE. Not experience. The cadets use the same ranks, and the officers have a commission, but it's not a microcosm of the actual RAF.

The cadets is effectively a resource you can use to learn more about the RAF and get some leadership experience and training, and an idea of what dress and discipline is. If you do everything the cadets have to offer it can be very beneficial to your CV, but it's no guarantee. I read a statistic somewhere that said that upwards of 75% of the RAF are ex cadets. Every single person applying for pilot i'd imagine without fail was once a cadet of some type or description. Competition is still fierce and the careers office will want to see much more than just 'I was a cadet and flew and got some promotions'.


I would 100% recommend joining, but join because you want to be there, and because of the opportunities they have. Don't see it as a free pass into the RAF
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unruly1986
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The main thing you need to have is LIFE BALANCE. So don't throw everything at the cadets; concentrate on your studies, get involved with a team sport, perhaps get involved with a local charity, try and travel (age can restrict this but think about it at least - school trips?).

Others may add to this but try and cover these points:

Leadership
Adventure
Sports
Fitness
Cultural balance
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