Sheepish153
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Can anyone tell me if it's a good idea to do an Earth Science/Geology degree if I'm really not interested in the oil industry? I don't really agree with it since it's a non-renewable resource.

Are there many other options if you don't consider such an option? I'm really interested in doing environmental-type research in the field and I'm just wondering how expansive or not opportunities are in this area.

Any help? I'm currently doing Physics, Geography, Maths and Chemistry AS and I will drop Chemistry and take up Further Maths next year...
0
reply
Sheepish153
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#2
bump
0
reply
Katie Gurney
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
There are all sorts of pathways you can take within a geology course. Most unis do an environmental pathway within a geology course. On my visit to Lancaster, I noticed the were particularly biased towards environmental sciences within geology and geography, so maybe check them out?
Geology is not even nearly all about the petroleum industry.
Other unis will do specific environmental courses, linked more with geography and sustainability. There's loads of choice other than being limited to oil!
:!


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
FlyHigh_er
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
(Original post by Sheepish153)
Can anyone tell me if it's a good idea to do an Earth Science/Geology degree if I'm really not interested in the oil industry? I don't really agree with it since it's a non-renewable resource.

Are there many other options if you don't consider such an option? I'm really interested in doing environmental-type research in the field and I'm just wondering how expansive or not opportunities are in this area.

Any help? I'm currently doing Physics, Geography, Maths and Chemistry AS and I will drop Chemistry and take up Further Maths next year...
To second that, you can do anything you like really. Geology is not petroleum geoscience. In a geology degree you will study much more than that, in fact, for most courses it doesn't even come up in the first year. Look at the modules on different courses, you will see what I'm talking about. Thus, you can go into so many geological fields. Volcanology, mineralogy. Also look at environmental geoscience courses. It's like the in-between of geology and environmental science/geography.

Also, chemistry (and physics) is the most important subject since geology contains a huge amount of it so I would reconsider dropping it unless you find it particularly hard (like don't think you will get a B at the end of A level). Obviously you will get in without it but it's easier for the first year if you have it. Eg I had a C in chem and a B in bio and still got into UCL and Bristol so don't let it being your lowest grade put you off.

Note, unless it's because of your school, you really don't have to do an extra AS. I started AS further maths as well and although I loved it I realised it was unnecessary so I just got the book and do it myself, but only when I have spare time.
0
reply
Sheepish153
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#5
(Original post by FlyHigh_er)
To second that, you can do anything you like really. Geology is not petroleum geoscience. In a geology degree you will study much more than that, in fact, for most courses it doesn't even come up in the first year. Look at the modules on different courses, you will see what I'm talking about. Thus, you can go into so many geological fields. Volcanology, mineralogy. Also look at environmental geoscience courses. It's like the in-between of geology and environmental science/geography.

Also, chemistry (and physics) is the most important subject since geology contains a huge amount of it so I would reconsider dropping it unless you find it particularly hard (like don't think you will get a B at the end of A level). Obviously you will get in without it but it's easier for the first year if you have it. Eg I had a C in chem and a B in bio and still got into UCL and Bristol so don't let it being your lowest grade put you off.

Note, unless it's because of your school, you really don't have to do an extra AS. I started AS further maths as well and although I loved it I realised it was unnecessary so I just got the book and do it myself, but only when I have spare time.
Thank you this is helpful! I guess I have been considering options such as environmental geoscience - even looking at modules its hard to imagine what you would enjoy! With chemistry, I have a bad teacher - we do hardly any work during the year and its basically up to us to teach it to ourselves. At AS level, I'm hovering on the A/B border on the papers but I'm bad at practical, so I'm worried that I won't be able to handle it next year without sacrificing other subjects. Also, if I do Geophysics, I imagine that further maths might be more useful? I would have more confidence getting a good grade in it and I would certainly enjoy my final year more, because currently chemistry lessons are bordering on unbearable.
0
reply
Sheepish153
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#6
(Original post by Katie Gurney)
There are all sorts of pathways you can take within a geology course. Most unis do an environmental pathway within a geology course. On my visit to Lancaster, I noticed the were particularly biased towards environmental sciences within geology and geography, so maybe check them out?
Geology is not even nearly all about the petroleum industry.
Other unis will do specific environmental courses, linked more with geography and sustainability. There's loads of choice other than being limited to oil!
:!


Posted from TSR Mobile
Thank you! Is there anyway to tell how biased a uni is? Just looking at modules? I know I want to go to Scotland because of the 4 year structure. I would just be worried that the only jobs I could get to start off anyway would be in that industry. :/
0
reply
Katie Gurney
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
You can look at the course online and look at the modules. There are a loads to choose from in all the unis.
I noticed how biased Lancaster was when I went on the open day, and I don't think I would've realised if I hadn't have went there. If you can get on an open day to a Scottish uni, that would probably be best!
From any courses at any uni, even if it's Aberdeen, there will be a wide range of jobs available!
Just a heads up, if you do decide to do a geology degree, you have to do a chemistry catch up course, as well as maths, depending on if you've done them at a level. So I've got to do a chem one bc I had the same problem as you (bad teacher etc - I dropped it in January of year 12!). However, don't let that put you off. It's all the relevant chemistry in a short module specifically designed for what you need to know. So, you could drop chemistry into year 13, as long as you're confident of getting BBB-AAA to get into a uni.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Sheepish153
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#8
(Original post by Katie Gurney)
You can look at the course online and look at the modules. There are a loads to choose from in all the unis.
I noticed how biased Lancaster was when I went on the open day, and I don't think I would've realised if I hadn't have went there. If you can get on an open day to a Scottish uni, that would probably be best!
From any courses at any uni, even if it's Aberdeen, there will be a wide range of jobs available!
Just a heads up, if you do decide to do a geology degree, you have to do a chemistry catch up course, as well as maths, depending on if you've done them at a level. So I've got to do a chem one bc I had the same problem as you (bad teacher etc - I dropped it in January of year 12!). However, don't let that put you off. It's all the relevant chemistry in a short module specifically designed for what you need to know. So, you could drop chemistry into year 13, as long as you're confident of getting BBB-AAA to get into a uni.


Posted from TSR Mobile
Ok the thing about the catch up course really put my mind at ease! My brother is in first year uni and he was saying that his chemistry modules would be difficult if you hadn't done the A2, but if there's a tailor-made option that would be perfect!
I've been to a Geoscience open day at Edinburgh but it was in the winter and my thoughts have changed quite a bit since then, so most of the points I picked up on aren't really relevant anymore. There are people at unis that you can email to ask questions about the course rather than paying to travel there, right?
0
reply
Katie Gurney
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
Yes, always. Best to start with the undergraduate admissions people in the earth science dept, and they'll then tell you the best person to get in contact with. Just get as much info as possible, and really research the courses. There are often taster/sample lectures on the uni earth science home page, just do a bit of digging. Likewise with the available modules.
I'm shocking at chemistry, because the teacher put me in a really bad mindset about it, but dropping it was the best decision I've ever made. I'm at no disadvantage having not done it; some people haven't even done geology before doing a geology course at uni!


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
FlyHigh_er
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
(Original post by Sheepish153)
Thank you this is helpful! I guess I have been considering options such as environmental geoscience - even looking at modules its hard to imagine what you would enjoy! With chemistry, I have a bad teacher - we do hardly any work during the year and its basically up to us to teach it to ourselves. At AS level, I'm hovering on the A/B border on the papers but I'm bad at practical, so I'm worried that I won't be able to handle it next year without sacrificing other subjects. Also, if I do Geophysics, I imagine that further maths might be more useful? I would have more confidence getting a good grade in it and I would certainly enjoy my final year more, because currently chemistry lessons are bordering on unbearable.
Chemistry will help you a lot. Although it's not a requirement at some unis eg UCL, if you don't do chem you miss out on an interesting module that those who did chem get to do because you have to do a catch up course. It's much easier to do it and get a B. This is unless you're aiming for imperial/Oxbridge. Then your priorities may have to change in that respect.

As for geophysics, you don't need further maths, it won't make a difference. Remember that earth science courses are under demanded so as long as you apply with the entry grades and have a good PS etc, you should get in. Most people get into all five choices unless their subject choice is poor since usually only one science is required. So don't waste your time doing further maths, A2 will be harder than you think and if you keep chemistry every moment will count. Physics is the important bit, they just need to know that you're good at maths. It is more physics than maths. In that case you could drop chemistry. But some unis, eg Bristol (where I'm going in sept) merge geophysics and geology into the geology course but the head of dept said there is a lot of chemistry so I dunno, it depends on you since you know what you can do.

Also take a look at Manchester's geology with plan start science course, you may like it, it has a higher maths/physics content if you're interested in that kind of stuff.

What kind of universities are you looking at?


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Sheepish153
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#11
(Original post by FlyHigh_er)
Chemistry will help you a lot. Although it's not a requirement at some unis eg UCL, if you don't do chem you miss out on an interesting module that those who did chem get to do because you have to do a catch up course. It's much easier to do it and get a B. This is unless you're aiming for imperial/Oxbridge. Then your priorities may have to change in that respect.

As for geophysics, you don't need further maths, it won't make a difference. Remember that earth science courses are under demanded so as long as you apply with the entry grades and have a good PS etc, you should get in. Most people get into all five choices unless their subject choice is poor since usually only one science is required. So don't waste your time doing further maths, A2 will be harder than you think and if you keep chemistry every moment will count. Physics is the important bit, they just need to know that you're good at maths. It is more physics than maths. In that case you could drop chemistry. But some unis, eg Bristol (where I'm going in sept) merge geophysics and geology into the geology course but the head of dept said there is a lot of chemistry so I dunno, it depends on you since you know what you can do.

Also take a look at Manchester's geology with plan start science course, you may like it, it has a higher maths/physics content if you're interested in that kind of stuff.

What kind of universities are you looking at?


Posted from TSR Mobile
I guess the thing with chemistry is, I picked it instead of french or spanish because I thought it would be a good thing to have, logically. But I really loved languages and regretted every minute that I wasn't doing it this year. Maths feels like a language to me and I love it just as much and I know I would really miss not having maths classes next year. Plus I'm reading a Geochemistry textbook and something came up in it that my brother said I would do in Further Maths.

Also I'm not sure that I will do a pure earth science (tbh really not interested in geology courses, more geophysics or environmental geoscience) or physical geography. I just know I want to be able to travel and work in the field, possibly with development work and I want an actual skill rather than just theoretical knowledge. So if I'm not exactly sure what degree to go with, I'm uneasy about choosing a subject that I'm not that into next year :/

I'm looking at Scottish universities only because I like the four year idea and I value the opportunity to get a broad base - also its easier to switch courses if I decide my current degree isn't for me. The main ones I'm looking at are Edinburgh, St Andrews and Glasgow. I didn't realise that Earth Sciences were under demanded! Can't think why Would you know if it's possible to write a personal statement if you apply to both Physical Geography courses and Earth Science courses? I'm not quite sure how it would work.
0
reply
Sheepish153
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#12
(Original post by Katie Gurney)
Yes, always. Best to start with the undergraduate admissions people in the earth science dept, and they'll then tell you the best person to get in contact with. Just get as much info as possible, and really research the courses. There are often taster/sample lectures on the uni earth science home page, just do a bit of digging. Likewise with the available modules.
I'm shocking at chemistry, because the teacher put me in a really bad mindset about it, but dropping it was the best decision I've ever made. I'm at no disadvantage having not done it; some people haven't even done geology before doing a geology course at uni!


Posted from TSR Mobile
Thank you so much! This has been so helpful!
0
reply
Katie Gurney
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report 5 years ago
#13
No problem! Good luck with making your decisions


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
FlyHigh_er
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#14
Report 5 years ago
#14
(Original post by Sheepish153)
I guess the thing with chemistry is, I picked it instead of french or spanish because I thought it would be a good thing to have, logically. But I really loved languages and regretted every minute that I wasn't doing it this year. Maths feels like a language to me and I love it just as much and I know I would really miss not having maths classes next year. Plus I'm reading a Geochemistry textbook and something came up in it that my brother said I would do in Further Maths.

Also I'm not sure that I will do a pure earth science (tbh really not interested in geology courses, more geophysics or environmental geoscience) or physical geography. I just know I want to be able to travel and work in the field, possibly with development work and I want an actual skill rather than just theoretical knowledge. So if I'm not exactly sure what degree to go with, I'm uneasy about choosing a subject that I'm not that into next year :/

I'm looking at Scottish universities only because I like the four year idea and I value the opportunity to get a broad base - also its easier to switch courses if I decide my current degree isn't for me. The main ones I'm looking at are Edinburgh, St Andrews and Glasgow. I didn't realise that Earth Sciences were under demanded! Can't think why Would you know if it's possible to write a personal statement if you apply to both Physical Geography courses and Earth Science courses? I'm not quite sure how it would work.
Is your school the type that does maths in one year? If so, I would still advise you to leave further maths and focus on physics. As for environmental science, it is much more chemistry than geology in terms of wet and organic chemistry. Geology is more inorganic/calculations and analysis chemistry.

Geology is a very in the field subject. It's not just theoretical. It's just 'different' from geography and enviro sci. If you're interested in development stuff, you'll get less of it geophysics than you will in geology. Geophysics contains a lot of structural stuff, so like plates etc. geophysics is more theoretical than geology.

Geochemistry is an aspect of geology so if you're interested in that look at geology more closely.

I can tell you don't really know what you want to do. I would recommend you getting a copy of 'Supercontinent' by Ted Nield or 'The Earth' by Richard Fortey - if you enjoy them, you will enjoy geology or geophysics. If you don't enjoy the former but enjoy the later parts of the latter, you will enjoy enviro sci. If you enjoy the former more than the latter then you will enjoy geophysics most.


Really, what you need to think is what you enjoy.

For example, maths is my favourite subject, I'm a natural at it and I love doing it in my spare time. So hence, I thought maths degree was for me. But I remember at GCSE physics, I really enjoyed the module on Wegener's theory on plate tectonics etc, and I realised I still wanted to know more about it. I also loved learning about volcanoes and chemistry, especially organically, is something I enjoy. I wanted to combine it all. Therefore I found geology. I want to work at an oil company, and I see why you don't but it's because they're at the forefront of sustainability, not all the development agencies. That's how I decided.

But, yes, answering your question on PS, you can write one for earth sciences and physical geography but you've got to make sure they have some similar modules that you can talk about. I won't lie, it will take more effort.

On the note of unis, I know what you mean, but the four year thing was why I didn't apply to Aberdeen. What if I decide that I wanted to do a masters after, that'd be five years. Also note that most of the Scottish unis are experts in petroleum geology, there may be a little bias as with lancaster. I also wanted to study abroad, I don't want my degree to take too long.

this is long XD


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Sheepish153
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#15
(Original post by FlyHigh_er)
Is your school the type that does maths in one year? If so, I would still advise you to leave further maths and focus on physics. As for environmental science, it is much more chemistry than geology in terms of wet and organic chemistry. Geology is more inorganic/calculations and analysis chemistry.

Geology is a very in the field subject. It's not just theoretical. It's just 'different' from geography and enviro sci. If you're interested in development stuff, you'll get less of it geophysics than you will in geology. Geophysics contains a lot of structural stuff, so like plates etc. geophysics is more theoretical than geology.

Geochemistry is an aspect of geology so if you're interested in that look at geology more closely.

I can tell you don't really know what you want to do. I would recommend you getting a copy of 'Supercontinent' by Ted Nield or 'The Earth' by Richard Fortey - if you enjoy them, you will enjoy geology or geophysics. If you don't enjoy the former but enjoy the later parts of the latter, you will enjoy enviro sci. If you enjoy the former more than the latter then you will enjoy geophysics most.


Really, what you need to think is what you enjoy.

For example, maths is my favourite subject, I'm a natural at it and I love doing it in my spare time. So hence, I thought maths degree was for me. But I remember at GCSE physics, I really enjoyed the module on Wegener's theory on plate tectonics etc, and I realised I still wanted to know more about it. I also loved learning about volcanoes and chemistry, especially organically, is something I enjoy. I wanted to combine it all. Therefore I found geology. I want to work at an oil company, and I see why you don't but it's because they're at the forefront of sustainability, not all the development agencies. That's how I decided.

But, yes, answering your question on PS, you can write one for earth sciences and physical geography but you've got to make sure they have some similar modules that you can talk about. I won't lie, it will take more effort.

On the note of unis, I know what you mean, but the four year thing was why I didn't apply to Aberdeen. What if I decide that I wanted to do a masters after, that'd be five years. Also note that most of the Scottish unis are experts in petroleum geology, there may be a little bias as with lancaster. I also wanted to study abroad, I don't want my degree to take too long.

this is long XD


Posted from TSR Mobile
I hear you about the length of study - I'm mid-way through exams and I feel like I've had enough study to last a life time! Doubtless the enjoyment of it will return though ...I hope. I'm thinking that possibly that it will matter less on the degree and more on what I make out of my time at uni and in particular the summer holidays? Gaining practical skills... Seeing I'm so undecided about all this, the extra year may prove very useful in trying out different options!

I read a few pages of those books and they BOTH seemed enjoyable! It would be much easier if there was something I disliked. As a kid I was fascinated by documentaries on earthquakes, volcanoes, tornadoes, environments etc but I didn't consider a degree in it until recently. It seems like chemistry really would be beneficial to me though - I guess it will just take the summer to decide if I can stick with it for another year.

You said about focusing on physics: is there much physics in geology or earth science in general even? I've never really thought of it as having much application apart from the mechanics parts that I assume would be used in remote sensing?

Thanks for taking the time to help me out btw - I really appreciate it
0
reply
FlyHigh_er
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#16
Report 5 years ago
#16
(Original post by Sheepish153)
I hear you about the length of study - I'm mid-way through exams and I feel like I've had enough study to last a life time! Doubtless the enjoyment of it will return though ...I hope. I'm thinking that possibly that it will matter less on the degree and more on what I make out of my time at uni and in particular the summer holidays? Gaining practical skills... Seeing I'm so undecided about all this, the extra year may prove very useful in trying out different options!

I read a few pages of those books and they BOTH seemed enjoyable! It would be much easier if there was something I disliked. As a kid I was fascinated by documentaries on earthquakes, volcanoes, tornadoes, environments etc but I didn't consider a degree in it until recently. It seems like chemistry really would be beneficial to me though - I guess it will just take the summer to decide if I can stick with it for another year.

You said about focusing on physics: is there much physics in geology or earth science in general even? I've never really thought of it as having much application apart from the mechanics parts that I assume would be used in remote sensing?

Thanks for taking the time to help me out btw - I really appreciate it
Geology degrees have more contact hours and less reading hours so for example, at Bristol i will have 24 contact hours (this is a lot, only med etc and engineering have more) and won't have to do much outside studying. Also 3 hour labs three times a week is part of this. So it depends if you feel like that's how you like to study. It does change in the second and third years.

If you enjoyed both, I would suggest doing Geology. Particularly look for courses like Bristol's (this is the main reason I picked it over UCL and Durham) and Manchester's courses which fuse geophysics and geology into one course rather than unis which have two separate courses since this will mean you can study both.

There is A LOT of physics in geology however, like chemistry it's not required that you have studied it at A Level, since physics is. Much easier to understand than Chemistry, although it's not required as well. Eg, I didn't do physics.

Think of geology as an amalgamation of maths physics chem and bio (a little bit). You will enjoy it if you enjoy all three.

Everything in geology is physics and chemistry, maths is just used to understand it. Just because there is a study of geophysics doesn't remove the fact that geology is the application of physics to the solid earth. So there will be a lot of physics and chemistry. Geophysics just means thee won't be all the very chemistry based stuff like soils (geotechnics) and the atmospherical stuff, you know? Physics is about volcanoes, glaciation, everything really. If you enjoyed the books I would say go for it.

But like, I totally understand, it took me the summer to take the risk; I haven't studied it at A Level too.

In terms of the extra year, I just feel like for a subject like this it sets you back. The Scottish go early, but you'd be going as a normal A Level student. And to get into the industry you'd have to do the 4 yr MSci or an MSc after, that's five years you'd be doing. But if you think it's worth it then go for it. Just take the summer to think about it.

And it's cool I'm happy to help.





Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Zottula
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#17
Report 5 years ago
#17
Just thought I'd also chip in.

You don't have to go into oil & gas. People in my department have got jobs in oil & gas, mining, environment and resource management (e.g. water). They've also got jobs at civil engineering/geotechnical firms - for example, if you're going to develop some land, build a tunnel or bridge etc then you'll need geoscientists to carry out site investigations so you know what sort of rocks you're dealing with and potential hazards such as faults). People have also gone into scientific investigations jobs. I think one year someone from the department got a job at the European Space Agency. I also know of people getting jobs in catastrophe management - e.g. working in areas where volcanoes/earthquakes are serious hazard and need monitoring and emergency strategies put in place.

Some people have gone into less directly related careers, such as finance, because of the numerical and analytical skills developed.

Yes you will cover a lot of physics, maths and chemistry in your course, and also biology (especially if you take more paleontology options). For example you'll do a lot of work on radioactive dating of rocks/lavas, also looking at the isotopic signature of rocks/lavas which can be used to trace source reservoirs. When studying minerals, you'll go down to the atomic level to understand their different properties and formation. This is just a brief overview though. You may also learn about how the universe formed, and look at the physics of different reactions that formed the materials that formed rocks/planets. Studying the internal structure of the Earth will also involve quite a bit of physics, and you'll look at heat flow, the magnetic field etc. There will also be all the applied stuff, like looking at different sets of geochemical and geophysical data to identify structures/ore deposits/contamination. This is just a brief overview though of where the chemistry and physics will come into it.

It's an awesome subject and I have really enjoyed my course (except for exams, those have been hideous). Would definitely recommend.
0
reply
Sheepish153
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#18
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#18
(Original post by Zottula)
Just thought I'd also chip in.

You don't have to go into oil & gas. People in my department have got jobs in oil & gas, mining, environment and resource management (e.g. water). They've also got jobs at civil engineering/geotechnical firms - for example, if you're going to develop some land, build a tunnel or bridge etc then you'll need geoscientists to carry out site investigations so you know what sort of rocks you're dealing with and potential hazards such as faults). People have also gone into scientific investigations jobs. I think one year someone from the department got a job at the European Space Agency. I also know of people getting jobs in catastrophe management - e.g. working in areas where volcanoes/earthquakes are serious hazard and need monitoring and emergency strategies put in place.

Some people have gone into less directly related careers, such as finance, because of the numerical and analytical skills developed.

Yes you will cover a lot of physics, maths and chemistry in your course, and also biology (especially if you take more paleontology options). For example you'll do a lot of work on radioactive dating of rocks/lavas, also looking at the isotopic signature of rocks/lavas which can be used to trace source reservoirs. When studying minerals, you'll go down to the atomic level to understand their different properties and formation. This is just a brief overview though. You may also learn about how the universe formed, and look at the physics of different reactions that formed the materials that formed rocks/planets. Studying the internal structure of the Earth will also involve quite a bit of physics, and you'll look at heat flow, the magnetic field etc. There will also be all the applied stuff, like looking at different sets of geochemical and geophysical data to identify structures/ore deposits/contamination. This is just a brief overview though of where the chemistry and physics will come into it.

It's an awesome subject and I have really enjoyed my course (except for exams, those have been hideous). Would definitely recommend.
I think you just sold me your subject at the second paragraph! Resource management, catastrophe management, they seem like the things for me! Can you go into these from any of the Earth Science degrees, or would geology cover these?
0
reply
Zottula
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#19
Report 5 years ago
#19
(Original post by Sheepish153)
I think you just sold me your subject at the second paragraph! Resource management, catastrophe management, they seem like the things for me! Can you go into these from any of the Earth Science degrees, or would geology cover these?
I only know one person who went into some catastrophe management role (they went to a different uni to me though), I'm pretty sure they did a geology degree, and then a masters in natural hazards or something like that. I don't know if it's a very common route though.. I know some people have gone into scientific investigation/advisory jobs with the government though, so perhaps it will involve similar sorts of things.

Most people I know with geology degrees have gone into mining, oil, environmental, geotechnical and finance jobs. Geology would be fine for any of these. If you really enjoy maths then there's Geophysics (although the top geology courses have a fair amount of maths anyway).

If you love learning and research then there's always academia . Oh, and don't forget many graduate jobs are open to people from any discipline.

Some universities have career profiles of previous graduates on their sites. So you could look around for these to get an idea of what people have gone into after graduating from the departments you are interested in.
0
reply
Katie Gurney
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#20
Report 5 years ago
#20
Just to add in again, hazard management in LDCs is what I'm primarily interested in, and I was even before I did geology in sixth form, and I'm doing a geology course at uni. I know there are modules to do with hazards and engineering within my geology degree available in the first, second and third years.


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Stirling
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Thu, 26 Sep '19
  • Heriot-Watt University
    Undergraduate Open Day - Scottish Borders Campus Undergraduate
    Fri, 27 Sep '19
  • Royal Holloway, University of London
    Undergraduate open day Undergraduate
    Sat, 28 Sep '19

Are you attending a Global Climate Strike?

Yes, I'm striking (33)
7.38%
No, but I wanted to/I support the cause (263)
58.84%
No (151)
33.78%

Watched Threads

View All