Self studying Latin GCSE - Year 10 in Sept 14

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gosforthtsr
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Hello TSR, I decided to do a Latin GCSE two years ago, however I moved schools and I only finished the first book of the Cambridge Latin Course. I have recently decided to re-pursue the GCSE, but outside of school with no help. I have the series of books, but a few questions.
1) Any studying tips for CLC Latin GCSE?
2) I realise that CLC does not have an exam board, who would I take the GCSE with?
3) If I do a GCSE outside of school, and then when i'm 16, get a good grade in the exam, will it show up and be accepted as an actual GCSE on my results table?
Thanks
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Muffyn
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Hiya,

I'm not sure about other exam boards but I'm doing ocr latin.

How are you finding latin? Breezing through it?

Do some latin vocabulary test. Find some derivatives so that it makes it easier to memorise the words.

With any language, practise is the best way to go. Keep translating into English. Familiarise yourself with the latin grammar.

To be honest, latin language is easy if you are a logical person. The only thing that is hard is the latin literature, and I'm saying using the word 'hard' loosely - if you can memorise the English translation of the literature, then you'll be fine on the day of the exam.

Quizlet helps.


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Jessbear
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Hi,
Cambridge Latin course is ok, however it doesn't hammer in the grammar that is necessary to ensure an A* at GCSE very well. If you buy John Taylor's "essential GCSE Latin" book it makes sure that you can recognise constructions that they use a lot at GCSE. It also provides you with short sentences for quick practise of certain grammar points. Also, Cambridge latin course is great for vocab but I have heard very strange things about some students who have managed to sit GCSE latin without knowing what the nominative and accusative case is!
As far as I know, OCR is the only latin exam board for GCSE.
Good on you for taking it on by yourself, just be very careful about CLC, one of my friends moved into year 11 this year having only ever done CLC and was so far behind that she had to have extra grammar lessons. Hope this helps and best of luck for your GCSE!
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gosforthtsr
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(Original post by Jessbear)
Hi,
Cambridge Latin course is ok, however it doesn't hammer in the grammar that is necessary to ensure an A* at GCSE very well. If you buy John Taylor's "essential GCSE Latin" book it makes sure that you can recognise constructions that they use a lot at GCSE. It also provides you with short sentences for quick practise of certain grammar points. Also, Cambridge latin course is great for vocab but I have heard very strange things about some students who have managed to sit GCSE latin without knowing what the nominative and accusative case is!
As far as I know, OCR is the only latin exam board for GCSE.
Good on you for taking it on by yourself, just be very careful about CLC, one of my friends moved into year 11 this year having only ever done CLC and was so far behind that she had to have extra grammar lessons. Hope this helps and best of luck for your GCSE!
How do I go about taking the actual GCSE, would I have to find a centre somewhere? And thanks, I think I'll buy the book. Will it take two years for me to learn the syllabus or shorter? Thank you
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danconway
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(Original post by gosforthtsr)
How do I go about taking the actual GCSE, would I have to find a centre somewhere? And thanks, I think I'll buy the book. Will it take two years for me to learn the syllabus or shorter? Thank you
There are three exam boards for GCSE Latin: OCR (the main, established, and popular choice), WJEC (the new kid on the block really) and CIE (who offer IGCSE Latin, which seems to be much more difficult, but is at the same official level) – I'd pick OCR.

In terms of getting assessed, you'll have to enter as a private candidate – you need to find a centre – you pay the exam fee plus a little extra and you just turn up for the exams.

Just so you know what the OCR course entails, there are four 1-hour exams:
Unit A401: Language 1: easier with less vocab and easier grammar
Unit A402: Language 2: harder – more to learn!
Unit A403: Latin Prose Literature
Unit A404: Latin Verse Literature

The Lit papers will require a different kind of study and you'll have to study the words and style in depth, as well as being able to translate, identifying alliteration, assonance, sibilance and other stylistic features – this is the difficult part when you're self taught, because you need to identify them, but there are study packs out there for your help.

For GCSE, you should be on Book IV of the CLC and reading John Taylor's Essential GCSE Latin book. The vocab you should know is on the OCR website.

Good luck with your studies!
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gosforthtsr
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(Original post by danconway)
There are three exam boards for GCSE Latin: OCR (the main, established, and popular choice), WJEC (the new kid on the block really) and CIE (who offer IGCSE Latin, which seems to be much more difficult, but is at the same official level) – I'd pick OCR.

In terms of getting assessed, you'll have to enter as a private candidate – you need to find a centre – you pay the exam fee plus a little extra and you just turn up for the exams.

Just so you know what the OCR course entails, there are four 1-hour exams:
Unit A401: Language 1: easier with less vocab and easier grammar
Unit A402: Language 2: harder – more to learn!
Unit A403: Latin Prose Literature
Unit A404: Latin Verse Literature

The Lit papers will require a different kind of study and you'll have to study the words and style in depth, as well as being able to translate, identifying alliteration, assonance, sibilance and other stylistic features – this is the difficult part when you're self taught, because you need to identify them, but there are study packs out there for your help.

For GCSE, you should be on Book IV of the CLC and reading John Taylor's Essential GCSE Latin book. The vocab you should know is on the OCR website.

Good luck with your studies!
Thanks a lot, roughly how long would it take to complete each book assuming I did an about an hour a night, five days a week?
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danconway
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(Original post by gosforthtsr)
Thanks a lot, roughly how long would it take to complete each book assuming I did an about an hour a night, five days a week?
I really don't know. In our school, we were brought up on Caecilius from Year 7, so we did a book a year. You could easily skip through most of it though and focus on the important grammar, and doing a few stories to check your ability. I'd probably say you should aim on doing 3-4 new grammar concepts per week, and interlacing that with translations and loads of practice sentences. You should hopefully be ready by Year 11. But you've got a lot to do in a short amount of time – we were doing practice GCSE papers for most of Year 10.
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longsightdon
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(Original post by gosforthtsr)
Thanks a lot, roughly how long would it take to complete each book assuming I did an about an hour a night, five days a week?
Hi there! I'm currently doing my GCSE latin exams and hence have finished the whole OCR course.

My class did the Cambridge latin course up to book 4 (inc). I think the clc books help with translations skills which for me are most important. After the clc books and after i had learnt my entire vocab list translations were pretty much easy after that. However, you obviously need to know your grammar (basics) to translate well.

For the set texts i feel that this will be pretty difficult for you if ure studying it by urself because the latin can be quite complicated so its useful to go through it with the teachers but if youre ok with the text then all u need to do is learn the text and know how to BS about anything.

Anyways, good luck, any questions feel free to ask
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Lindissa
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(Original post by Jessbear)
Hi,
As far as I know, OCR is the only latin exam board for GCSE.
Actually, WJEC does Level 2 Certificates (GCSE equivalents) which are specifically designed to work with the CLC books. You take separate certificates in Literature and Language (with optional Roman Civ component), which may be easier to work towards if you are teaching yourself - you could do just the Language and then come back to the Lit later as this will be particularly difficult by yourself, since at GCSE you simply don't have sufficient language skills to be able to translate 'real' Latin with ease.

I'm taking my GCSE Latin with WJEC and I recommend it wholeheartedly - I think the lit is more interesting as it isn't prose and verse but 'narratives' (selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses or Messalina) and 'themes' (Books & Writers or Growing up in Rome). The CLC website has notes, translations and clickable-vocab versions of the texts, which may make it easier to learn by yourself.

Having said that, I do OCR for Greek and there's nothing wrong with it either. It is the older and more popular board for Latin, certainly. You may just find that WJEC is more flexible for your situation as Lang and Lit are distinct qualifications, although it might be more difficult to find a centre to sit the exams with.
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Jessbear
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For literature, you can buy workbooks for the set texts at www.classicalworkbooks.com. These are quite good and helpful to get you through the text. They don't help at all with the lit crit part of the paper. My suggestion is to choose the set text for your exam year that are a year old i.e. the ones that are being examined for the first time this year because then you might be able to get hold of one past paper for each text. As far as how long it will take you to get through the John Taylor book,it depends how easy you find latin and how fast you get as you go along- you will get faster with time. Just try and get through a lot of grammar before you start the set texts if you want to go with OCR- but don't forget about the literature as it makes up 50% of your final grade!
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