easyastau
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Are you allowed graphing calculators for A-level maths, further maths and physics?

If you are what models would you recommend?
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xiaomaoaini
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(Original post by easyastau)
Are you allowed graphing calculators for A-level maths, further maths and physics?

If you are what models would you recommend?
I can't say for Physics but I'm pretty sure there's a really strict ban on the use of graphing calculators in Maths exams! Can't say for definite that it applies to all exam boards (though it should do) but it definitely does for Edexcel. After all, since you'd be asked about things like the transformation of graphs, intersecting points of curves and the drawing of graphs that you may not necessarily know about (lnx, ex etc), then having a calculator that does all that for you kind of defeats the purpose of you learning them in the first place. If you're looking for a new scientific calculator though, Casio tend to make pretty good ones!

Hope that helps!
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easyastau
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(Original post by xiaomaoaini)
I can't say for Physics but I'm pretty sure there's a really strict ban on the use of graphing calculators in Maths exams! Can't say for definite that it applies to all exam boards (though it should do) but it definitely does for Edexcel. After all, since you'd be asked about things like the transformation of graphs, intersecting points of curves and the drawing of graphs that you may not necessarily know about (lnx, ex etc), then having a calculator that does all that for you kind of defeats the purpose of you learning them in the first place. If you're looking for a new scientific calculator though, Casio tend to make pretty good ones!

Hope that helps!

Okay, thanks for the advice
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JackB784
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I got a HP Prime but we have to put it in exam mode in the maths and physics exams. I wouldn't say it's worth it unless you get it for free on a bursary like me and a few friends did.
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JackB784
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You have to disable CAS if the calculator has it which is the feature that does algebra and stuff for you
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rickfloss
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waste of money, get a tablet with wolfram instead
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Physika
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Your allowed them in MEI further maths but there a waste of time they can only tell you what you need to figure out anyway


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Bloxorus
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I have one and use it for OCR maths and further maths. I would definitely recommend one especially for stats as it can do basically the whole paper for you (for S1 and 2 anyway).
As for its use in pure maths, it's useful for drawing graphs, especially in fp2 where quite a lot of the time you'll have graph drawing questions. Also it can save a bit of time solving all types of equations including simultaneous ones (useful for fp1 and the likes when you have 3 unknowns).


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Bloxorus
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(Original post by rickfloss)
waste of money, get a tablet with wolfram instead
You can't bring a tablet into exams but you can with a graphing calculator...


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rickfloss
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(Original post by Bloxorus)
You can't bring a tablet into exams but you can with a graphing calculator...


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really, at uni they only allow you certain calcs

most definitley not graphic ones

Ie your plain old cas fx 85es
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Bounce00100
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You are allowed graphic calculators in all maths other than C1 (I believe that's the only non calculator one), there are usually some restrictions on the type of graphical calculator you are allowed, but this will be explained by the exam board.
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Bloxorus
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(Original post by rickfloss)
really, at uni they only allow you certain calcs

most definitley not graphic ones

Ie your plain old cas fx 85es
Well this guy is asking about A level...
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BlackLipBastard
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Someone explain to me how a Graphic Calculator works & how would it benefit me for A2 maths
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easyastau
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(Original post by Bloxorus)
Well this guy is asking about A level...
I'm a girl
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Bounce00100
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(Original post by BlackLip*******)
Someone explain to me how a Graphic Calculator works & how would it benefit me for A2 maths
There is a massive range things it can do, most people just use the graph mode for simply drawing graphs and calculus. However they are a lot more powerful than most people think and are very very useful in A levels The polynomial equation solver will find the roots of an equation up to 6th order (power of 6), the simultaneous equation solver finds the values of up to 6 unknowns in simultaneous equations. On the graph mode you can visually find the roots/intersections of curves. You can also do integration graphically so you can see the enclosed region and can find the max/min points and the gradient at any point on the curve. It can also plot radial graphs and parametric graphs. On the normal maths mode, it can again do calculus, which is pretty useful for checking any integration/differentiation you've done. It can evaluate summations between specified n values (I've used it to find a trapezium rule approximation with 65000 strips). It has a unit converter. It's also able to give you the equation of a curve that passes through certain points. It can plot a line of best fit through data. For stats it can do calculations using the normal distribution, the chi distribution and testing, the binomial distribution, f distribution, t distribution, poisson distribution... erm it can calculate mean, standard deviation, and a bunch of other deviation values. It can also give you a table of iterations containing up to 2 preceding terms. Is that enough...?

Btw I use a Casio 9860gii
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BlackLipBastard
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(Original post by Bounce00100)
There is a massive range things it can do, most people just use the graph mode for simply drawing graphs and calculus. However they are a lot more powerful than most people think and are very very useful in A levels The polynomial equation solver will find the roots of an equation up to 6th order (power of 6), the simultaneous equation solver finds the values of up to 6 unknowns in simultaneous equations. On the graph mode you can visually find the roots/intersections of curves. You can also do integration graphically so you can see the enclosed region and can find the max/min points and the gradient at any point on the curve. It can also plot radial graphs and parametric graphs. On the normal maths mode, it can again do calculus, which is pretty useful for checking any integration/differentiation you've done. It can evaluate summations between specified n values (I've used it to find a trapezium rule approximation with 65000 strips). It has a unit converter. It's also able to give you the equation of a curve that passes through certain points. It can plot a line of best fit through data. For stats it can do calculations using the normal distribution, the chi distribution and testing, the binomial distribution, f distribution, t distribution, poisson distribution... erm it can calculate mean, standard deviation, and a bunch of other deviation values. It can also give you a table of iterations containing up to 2 preceding terms. Is that enough...?

Btw I use a Casio 9860gii
Oh wow
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missm95
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Hi, ive just recently started using the fx-9860GII graphical calculator, and I was wondering how I can get it to label points on trigonometric graphs in terms of pi, instead of numbers when I have it in radians mode? For example when I graph the sin function is shows me the graph intersects the x axis at 3.14159.... which is pi, but how do I actually make it show me the number as pi?
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