I don't see depression as a proper illness that should be treated by the NHS

Watch
BlackLipBastard
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
Just to play devil's advocate because of some discussion earlier, in short, it is pointless going to the doctor if you have 'depression'. No anti depressant is going to heal it, the only way you can get rid of the depression is by coming to terms with the thing that made you depressed. Nowadays if anyone is upset by life e.g. didn't get the grades they needed for their preferred university course, they class themselves as being depressed. I just find this idea stupid. Anyone beg to differ?
4
reply
limetang
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
You are in part correct. There are a good many people who misuse the term to describe feeling sad (essentially). I've met people who've described themselves as being depressed because a family member has died or something bad has happened... that's not depression that's just the normal human response to bad things happening, and generally it is short lived and people move on with their lives from these situations.

Depression is another ball game entirely, and often there isn't a 'thing' that makes you depressed. I've known people suffering with depression who know they don't have a 'reason' to be feeling the way they do, but do regardless.The problem with it is that it is a class of mental illness, and the problem with THAT is that we believe that our minds are things we should have complete control and mastery over as opposed to our bodies where illness can happen so there is often an implicit sense of just thinking yourself out of it because after all it's your mind and THAT is something you ought to be able to do.
23
reply
vickidc18
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
Clinical depression, wanting to commit suicide not being able to function is AN illness, it's being stuck in this dark hole and you can't seem to climb out, I agree with you in the sense it's only you who can bring yourself out of the dark place, by accepting the help, meds and support.
4
reply
Theflyingbarney
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report 7 years ago
#4
I have to agree with Limetang. There is a crucial distinction to make between people who say 'oh xyz did/didn't happen to me, I'm so depressed' and people who are medically diagnosed as having depression. Completely agree that the former should get nowhere near the NHS but the latter is an entirely different matter.

In the case of actual medical depression, there often isn't an outright cause or any particular trauma that needs to be addressed. As far as I can tell, for example, my depression is entirely genetic (which can happen) - both of my parents have suffered from it at times, and my life is otherwise pretty good; I certainly haven't had any big event that could have triggered it or made me particularly upset, and when I'm not in a depressive period I look back at myself and I tend to realise that the things that I get upset and/or worried about when I'm feeling down are actually pretty trivial. But I can't help it myself - it's not a rational or logical thought process and so the suggestion to consider everything in context, which is quite sensible when someone's just upset over something normal, doesn't work.

So yes, there is an issue with the overplaying of depression but that's down to abuse of the term and excessive self-diagnosis, which devalues the label for what can actually be a serious medical condition and contributes to further misunderstanding.
1
reply
getjob5
Badges: 15
#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
I agree, but depends on how severe it is.
0
reply
tengentoppa
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#6
Report 7 years ago
#6
It's like dyslexia. Some people really have it and can do nothing about it, and some people misuse the term.
5
reply
lucaf
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#7
Report 7 years ago
#7
except true depression is actually far more than simply feeling down. It may or may not be triggered by something in your life, but it is a chemical imbalance in the brain that can be medicated for. Simply telling them to cheer up is not going to help.
1
reply
bertstare
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#8
Report 7 years ago
#8
Sometimes life events can trigger genuine depression, usually when there is a genetic predisposition alongside. Other times, depression can occur completely independent of any logical causes, and you can find people with seemingly brilliant lives who are completely unable to feel any positive emotion. And you also get those people (as you mentioned) who just need to grow a pair. So in some cases it may be improperly diagnosed (especially when people try and self diagnose), in other situations it's most definitely a real and awful condition
0
reply
russellsteapot
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#9
Report 7 years ago
#9
I'd question why you feel a brain problem is less deserving of medical attention than, say, a kidney problem?
7
reply
bertstare
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#10
Report 7 years ago
#10
(Original post by russellsteapot)
I'd question why you feel a brain problem is less deserving of medical attention than, say, a kidney problem?
It's because a lot of people like to believe we are in control of our emotions, and with perseverance and the right steps anyone can overcome negative thinking. Which is definitely true in some cases. But no one believes you can think your way out of kidney failure
0
reply
ilem
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#11
Report 7 years ago
#11
Good thing you're not in any position to make decisions on NHS mental health care then.
16
reply
russellsteapot
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#12
Report 7 years ago
#12
(Original post by bertstare)
It's because a lot of people like to believe we are in control of our emotions, and with perseverance and the right steps anyone can overcome negative thinking. Which is definitely true in some cases. But no one believes you can think your way out of kidney failure
Apart from this genius.

But yes, the idea of emotional control is probably true, mixed in with some misunderstanding of what the illnesses involve (or just simply not knowing, as is the case with many brain-related issues).
0
reply
yo radical one
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#13
Report 7 years ago
#13
I disagree

Having a chemical or structural difference in your brain which causes you to feel sad or be hypersensitive in a chronic way, is not the same as simply being sad because you have had bad experiences. The latter is solved by either resolving the situation or having people help you resolving...
0
reply
Copycats&Acrobats
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#14
Report 7 years ago
#14
(Original post by BlackLip*******)
Just to play devil's advocate because of some discussion earlier, in short, it is pointless going to the doctor if you have 'depression'. No anti depressant is going to heal it, the only way you can get rid of the depression is by coming to terms with the thing that made you depressed. Nowadays if anyone is upset by life e.g. didn't get the grades they needed for their preferred university course, they class themselves as being depressed. I just find this idea stupid. Anyone beg to differ?
I beg to differ. I'm clinically depressed, and on anti-depressants. I'm not depressed because I didnt get the right grades, actually, I'm predicted to graduate with a high 2.1 or a 1st.
Depression is different things to different people, some people misuse the phrase depression, and others try and compare different people's reasons for being depressed. At the end of the day, it isnt the situations that should be compared, its how the people feel. Being truly depressed is like drowning and knowing that you're doing it to yourself but being unable to prevent it. Its feeling so low for so long that you dont remember what its actually like to be happy anymore. I agree that you need to tackle the source of the depression to deal with it properly, but sometimes depression is caused by a chemical imbalance in your brain, where medication is necessary to remedy this, or where depression has so altered your perception that you cant see any way out of the drowning feeling. sometimes medication helps you to see that this feeling isnt infinite. Its just the change in your perception.
Saying you're depressed and actually being clinically diagnosed are two different things, and there are different levels of depression.
1
reply
SerLorasTyrell
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#15
Report 7 years ago
#15
I heard there's little proof to back up the chemical imbalance argument


Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
carlisomes
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#16
Report 7 years ago
#16
Don't agree.

Seems you don't get how people use the English language. Being depressed over a relationship break up is just something said, not literally......If somebody says "I'd kill for a shag" you expect them to murder somebody and then have sex with somebody afterwards?

Anybody who says depression isn't an illness is a ****ing dope....so a person is so sad they can't work, wash, cook, clean, etc. and this lasts for weeks/months, yeah..not an illness...
0
reply
MrSupernova
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#17
Report 7 years ago
#17
(Original post by Theflyingbarney)
I have to agree with Limetang. There is a crucial distinction to make between people who say 'oh xyz did/didn't happen to me, I'm so depressed' and people who are medically diagnosed as having depression. Completely agree that the former should get nowhere near the NHS but the latter is an entirely different matter.
...
As far as I can tell, for example, my depression is entirely genetic
Seems like there's almost an element of "my depression is better than yours" here... Why is someone whose life has been turned completely upside down by the premature death of a relative, for example, less deserving of NHS treatment? As another poster said, depression can be triggered by traumatic events.
0
reply
Sabertooth
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#18
Report 7 years ago
#18
I was depressed for many years and tried various therapies and positive thinking strategies to get out of it. I was the lowest of the low, I wouldn't eat or shower for long stretches, I couldn't focus on my university work and even attempted suicide. What's worked though is antidepressants. I would go as far as saying I'm no longer depressed because of the drugs. Depression is as "real" as diabetes. There's no reason why the brain can't malfunction like the body does.
0
reply
TheBigJosh
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#19
Report 7 years ago
#19
Everyone has depression nowadays. That word is just thrown around for people that are just having a bad day.
0
reply
Olie
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#20
Report 7 years ago
#20
(Original post by TheBigJosh)
Everyone has depression nowadays. That word is just thrown around for people that are just having a bad day.
Well yes, like already addressed, the words depression and depressed are thrown around far too lightly these days and many people will just casually say 'I'm depressed' after a bad day at work, but that's not a reason to dismiss those suffering from genuine depression, i.e. those who suffer so much they can barely leave the house, or function properly in their daily lives. So while it is a term used too lightly these days, to say it isn't a 'proper illness' is just quite frankly ignorant and anyone who had suffered from real depression would certainly not agree.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you think receiving Teacher Assessed Grades will impact your future?

I'm worried it will negatively impact me getting into university/college (184)
43.6%
I'm worried that I’m not academically prepared for the next stage in my educational journey (49)
11.61%
I'm worried it will impact my future career (33)
7.82%
I'm worried that my grades will be seen as ‘lesser’ because I didn’t take exams (89)
21.09%
I don’t think that receiving these grades will impact my future (42)
9.95%
I think that receiving these grades will affect me in another way (let us know in the discussion!) (25)
5.92%

Watched Threads

View All