lilaecru
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#1
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#1
i everyone I've got stupid question. I want to be ob/gyn but I love infectious disease, so I can't make my final decision what should I choos. Do you know if there is an option to connect this two specialities? If I want to be infectious disease specialist on ob/gyn field should I finish 7 year training in OB/Gyn and then 6 years in ID (because as ob gyn I don't have core training passed...) Pliss give me some advice
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nexttime
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The first thing that springs to mind: infection and gynae? You're describing sexual health clinics.

The other obvious connection is that they are the two most in-demand specialities in the third world. Between them you probably have about 85-90% of the stuff coming into the hospital I was in for elective.

Training in two separate specialities would be pretty crazy.
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lilaecru
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#3
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Sure STI are part of OB GYN but I am mostly interested in Viral Hemorrhagic Fever I always want to work in developing counties but first I have to complete my training! Thanks for your answer. Does anyone hear about connected programs like thous infectious disease+tropical medicine??
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Kinkerz
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(Original post by lilaecru)
Sure STI are part of OB GYN but I am mostly interested in Viral Hemorrhagic Fever I always want to work in developing counties but first I have to complete my training! Thanks for your answer. Does anyone hear about connected programs like thous infectious disease+tropical medicine??
So you want to be an obstetrician, gynaecologist and tropical medicine specialist?
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Captain Crash
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(Original post by lilaecru)
Sure STI are part of OB GYN but I am mostly interested in Viral Hemorrhagic Fever I always want to work in developing counties but first I have to complete my training! Thanks for your answer. Does anyone hear about connected programs like thous infectious disease+tropical medicine??
Viral Haemorrhagic Fever is quite niche, even in the realm of Infectious Diseases - look at the current Sierra Leone outbreak where there are ~100 cases in a population of 6 million.

Anyway, in this country at least, there isn't a huge demand for Infectious Diseases, hence it is a very specialised and competitive speciality. Current training programs link it with General Medicine, Microbiology and Virology. You can also sub-specialise in Paediatrics ID. However, Obs/Gyn is a completely different skill set with virtually no overlap with Infectious Diseases, and it seems an odd request to want to joint train, of which there certainly isn't an option.

However, in the developing world, where Infectious Diseases / Tropical Medicine is basically general medicine for the country, doctors do often provide a cross-speciality service, particularly in smaller hospitals, potentially covering both Obs/Gyn and ID. However, this wouldn't be training as we know it in the UK.
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#6
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(Original post by lilaecru)
Sure STI are part of OB GYN but I am mostly interested in Viral Hemorrhagic Fever I always want to work in developing counties but first I have to complete my training! Thanks for your answer. Does anyone hear about connected programs like thous infectious disease+tropical medicine??
So you want to work with pregnant women with viral haemorrhagic fever specifically? Pretty niche there.

If you want to work in developing countries then i'd say the basic decision is surgery or medicine. If medicine, ID is almost definitely the way to go. Could possibly make a case for paediatrics. If surgery, obstetrics would cover the bulk of demand but other surgical specialities also find their place. Bowel perforation due to typhoid is common and necessitates general surgeons. Gynae surgeons to repair complications from prolonged labour like vesicovaginal fistulae. Even what would count as niche sub-speciality in the west can be useful there if you're sufficiently organised - cleft palates, spina bifida etc. The way to make the most difference with your life bar absolutely nothing is probably to become an ophthalmologist and go around Africa taking out cataracts.

You do have a decision to make unfortunately though. If you opt for a surgical route and actually are still thinking of working in rural developing world you could consider doing a diploma in tropical medicine to broaden your skills. Decide on a career first though and don't put everything on working abroad - people get older and priorities change. Do something where you wouldn't mind doing it in the UK if it came to it either.
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